Cases reported "Horner Syndrome"

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1/23. Congenital Horner's syndrome resulting from agenesis of the internal carotid artery.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a patient with agenesis of the right internal carotid artery associated with ipsilateral, congenital Homer's syndrome. DESIGN: Case report. methods: A 30-year-old woman, with a past history of migraine headaches, underwent neuro-ophthalmologic and neuroradiologic evaluation for transient visual obscurations and congenital Horner's syndrome. RESULTS: A right, third-order neuron Horner's syndrome was confirmed with 1% hydroxyamphetamine topical drops. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed an absent right internal carotid artery flow void, computed tomography demonstrated absence of the right carotid canal, and cerebral angiography confirmed absence of the right internal carotid artery. No atheromatous lesions were found and the results of coagulation studies were normal. CONCLUSIONS: Agenesis of the internal carotid artery is a rare cause of congenital Horner's syndrome. The cause of transient visual blurring in the current patient remains unproven.
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ranking = 1
keywords = headache, migraine
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2/23. stroke in a healthy 46-year-old man.

    This article presents the case of a healthy 46-year-old man who experienced a dissection of the internal carotid artery. The diagnosis of this condition is not usually clear-cut, especially in a young patient with unremarkable medical history, and because of the similarity of symptoms with migraine. Often there is no obvious cause of a cerebral artery dissection, although subtle abnormalities of connective tissue may be present. Anticoagulation is generally used for therapy, but clinical trials are lacking. Carotid artery dissection should be considered as a cause of stroke in young healthy adults.
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ranking = 0.12316775965144
keywords = migraine
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3/23. Spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection with lower cranial nerve palsy.

    BACKGROUND: Typical presentation of spontaneous internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection is an ipsilateral pain in neck and face with Horner's syndrome and contralateral deficits. Although rare, lower cranial nerve palsy have been reported in association with an ipsilateral spontaneous ICA dissection. CASE STUDIES: We report three new cases of ICA dissection with lower cranial nerve palsies. RESULTS: The first symtom to appear was headache in all three patients. Examination disclosed a Horner's syndrome in two cases (1 and 2), an isolated XIIth nerve palsy in two patients (case 1 and 3) and IX, X, and XIIth nerve palsies (case 2) revealing an ipsilateral carotid dissection, confirmed by MRI and angiography. In all cases, prognosis was good after a few weeks. CONCLUSIONS: These cases, analysed with those in the literature, led us to discuss two possible mechanisms: direct compression of cranial nerves by a subadventitial haematoma in the parapharyngeal space or ischemic palsy by compression of the ascending pharyngeal artery.
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ranking = 0.87683224034856
keywords = headache
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4/23. Ophthalmic presentations of cluster headache.

    cluster headache is frequently characterized by pain localized to the orbital area. There is often associated ipsilateral oculosympathetic paresis with varying degrees of blepharoptosis and miosis. The ophthalmologist is often confronted with such cases; however, the atypical presentations and the subtle clinical findings may obscure the diagnosis. As cluster headache is a benign condition, accurate recognition is essential to spare the patient potentially harmful diagnostic studies.
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ranking = 122.2152990378
keywords = cluster headache, headache, cluster
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5/23. Migraine and arterial dissection in a young woman.

    Ischemic stroke in young adults is rare (5%-10% of all ischemic strokes) and, in absence of other risk factors, may be associated with migraine. We describe the case of a 34-year-old woman, with a history of migraine without aura, who presented a sudden onset of headache with Horner's syndrome, and in whom neuroimaging showed evidence compatible with fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) and arterial dissection of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) and the carotid siphon. In our opinion, in young women with a long history of migraine, a careful study of the extracranial and intracranial arteries would be useful, although the cost/benefit ratio does not at present justify such a procedure. Our aim in the future is, therefore, to study a larger sample of migraine patients in order to find those patients who are most at risk of arterial dissection and who should, consequently, be carefully studied.
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ranking = 1.3695032789543
keywords = headache, migraine
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6/23. Raeder's syndrome.

    Raeder's paratrigeminal syndrome is a disorder manifested by unilateral ptosis, miosis, intact facial sweating, and severe pain in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the fifth nerve. It is a clinical pattern where, usually, a middle-aged male gets a severe throbbing supraorbital headache accompanied by ptosis and miosis. The headache is intermittently present for several weeks or months. Facial sweating may or may not be affected. This report describes a female with Raeder's syndrome who had unilateral facial anhibrosis.
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ranking = 1.7536644806971
keywords = headache
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7/23. Horner's syndrome and headache due to carotid artery disease.

    Horner's syndrome was accompanied by ipsilateral pain in the head, face, or neck in eight patients. In all cases angiography showed narrowing of the internal carotid artery in a pattern compatible with dissection within the arterial wall. In one patient in whom this diagnosis was substantiated by surgical exploration biopsy of the arterial wall showed changes typical of cystic medial necrosis. It is suggested that this clinical presentation constitutes a distinct syndrome.
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ranking = 3.5073289613942
keywords = headache
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8/23. pituitary apoplexy causing optic neuropathy and horner syndrome without ophthalmoplegia.

    A 47-year-old woman presented with headache, acute monocular vision loss, and ipsilateral horner syndrome. Apart from the optic neuropathy, all cranial nerve function was intact. magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enlarged pituitary gland with compression of the orbital apex. The surgical specimen was consistent with pituitary apoplexy. The combination of headache, acute visual loss, and ipsilateral horner syndrome without ophthalmoplegia, which may suggest carotid artery dissection, is evidently an unusual manifestation of pituitary apoplexy.
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ranking = 1.7536644806971
keywords = headache
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9/23. Painful isolated Horner's syndrome caused by pontine ischaemia.

    PURPOSE: To alert ophthalmologists to the possibility of brainstem ischaemia in patients with isolated Horner's syndrome. DESIGN: Observational case report. methods: Neuro-ophthalmological and neuroimaging assessment of a 59-year-old woman presenting with an isolated Horner's syndrome after an episode of headache. RESULTS: Horner's syndrome was pharmacologically localised to a first- or second-order sympathetic neuron on the right. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a small ischaemic lesion at the transition between pons and midbrain, lateral to the anterolateral system involving the sympathetic tract on the right side. CONCLUSION: An isolated Horner's syndrome may be the presenting sign of a brainstem infarction. This case report stresses the importance of a rational approach to Horner's syndrome and the need to order accurate MRI.
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ranking = 0.87683224034856
keywords = headache
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10/23. sunct syndrome in association with persistent horner syndrome in a Chinese patient.

    This is the first case report of a chinese patient with SUNCT (shortlasting, unilateral, neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing) presenting with persistent Horner's syndrome. She had episodic, brief, right periorbital pain in association with ipsilateral eye injection, lacrimation and rhinorrhea as well as persistent ipsilateral miosis and ptosis. She had partial response to a combination of indomethacin and carbamazepine therapy.
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ranking = 0.87683224034856
keywords = headache
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