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1/12. Streptococcal meningitis resulting from contact with an infected horse.

    We report a case of group C streptococcal meningitis in a woman with a history of close animal contact as well as head trauma as a result of a kick by a horse. blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures grew streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, as did a throat culture taken from the colt that had kicked her 2 weeks prior to admission.
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keywords = animal
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2/12. Isolation and characterization of two European strains of ehrlichia phagocytophila of equine origin.

    We report the isolation and partial genetic characterization of two equine strains of granulocytic ehrlichia of the genogroup ehrlichia phagocytophila. Frozen whole-blood samples from two Swedish horses with laboratory-verified granulocytic ehrlichiosis were inoculated into HL-60 cell cultures. Granulocytic ehrlichia was isolated and propagated from both horses. dna extracts from the respective strains were amplified by PCR using primers directed towards the 16S rRNA gene, the groESL heat shock operon gene, and the ank gene. The amplified gene fragments were sequenced and compared to known sequences in the GenBank database. With respect to the 16S rRNA gene, the groESL gene, and the ank gene, the dna sequences of the two equine ehrlichia isolates were identical to sequences found in isolates from clinical cases of granulocytic ehrlichiosis in humans and domestic animals in sweden. However, compared to amplified dna from an American ehrlichia strain of the E. phagocytophila genogroup, differences were found in the groESL gene and ank gene sequences.
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keywords = animal
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3/12. Acupuncture for gastrointestinal disorders.

    Acupuncture is best known for its application to various musculoskeletal pain-producing diseases. Acupuncture is, however, used for a large variety of internal medical diseases in humans and other animals. This chapter reviews some of the published literature on the use of acupuncture in gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, describes acupuncture points useful for a variety of GI diseases, briefly reviews how traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treats GI disease, and gives some case examples of how acupuncture can be used in GI diseases.
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keywords = animal
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4/12. Intraepidermal animal-type melanoma.

    Animal-type melanoma is a rare variant of melanoma in humans.1 Its name is derived from its histological appearance, which is similar to that described in melanomas occurring in white or gray horses.2 All tumors are dermally located, and characterized by a proliferation of deeply pigmented elongated or rounded cells, showing moderate atypia and a low mitotic rate. In some tumors, secondary infiltration of the epidermis has been noted. More than half of the patients are younger than 30 years, and prognosis seems to be much better than that expected for a superficial spreading or nodular melanoma of the same size. We report the first case of animal-type melanoma in situ.
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keywords = animal
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5/12. Immunoglobulin lambda-light-chain-derived amyloidosis (A lambda) in two horses.

    Tumorous amyloid deposits in the nasal mucosa of two horses differed from generalized AA-amyloidosis with respect to clinical features, organ distribution, and resistance to KMnO4 treatment. Using a panel of antibodies directed against different human amyloid fibril proteins and employing the peroxidase-anti-peroxidase (PAP) technique, we showed the described equine amyloid to be A lambda-type, as demonstrated by immunohistochemical cross-reactivity. Consequently, we identified a second amyloid class in horses and showed that immunoglobulin light-chain-derived amyloid may also be present in animals.
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keywords = animal
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6/12. Group C streptococcal arthritis. A case report of equine transmission.

    Presented is the third known case of a group C streptococcal arthritis, this case documented in a healthy 42-year-old horse trainer, apparently transmitted by a mare. After a delayed diagnosis, the patient responded favorably to surgical drainage and parenteral penicillin g, but required a manipulation of his knee under general anesthesia. Although rare, group C streptococcal arthritis can occur in hosts with no apparent predisposing factors. Frequent exposure to farm animals may increase the risk.
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keywords = animal
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7/12. Echocardiographic detection of ventricular septal defects in large animals.

    Ventricular septal defects in a foal, a 2-year-old filly, and 2 calves were demonstrated with M-mode and two-dimensional real-time echocardiography. The studies were performed with the animals unsedated, either standing or in lateral recumbency. Cardiac windows were located between the 4th and 7th intercostal spaces, approximately at the level of the olecranon. In each case, the septal defect was visualized high in the membranous portion of the interventricular septum. Defects were visualized by use of sector scanning or linear-array ultrasonic equipment, with transducer frequencies of 2.25 to 3.5 MHz.
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ranking = 5
keywords = animal
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8/12. Complications of cleft palate repair in large animals.

    Seven foals, 2 horses, and 2 calves were presented to the George D. Widener Hospital for Large animals at New Bolton Center and the Large Animal Clinic at Auburn University for surgical repair of cleft palate. All animals had preexisting pneumonia. Initial repair of cleft palate in 6 foals, 2 horses, and 2 calves was performed via mandibular symphysiotomy. Primary repair of cleft soft palate in a foal was attempted through a pharyngotomy incision after fracture of the basal hyoid bone; however, exposure was inadequate and mandibular symphysiotomy had to be done. Dehiscence of a portion of the cleft palate occurred in all cases (10 of 11) that survived the immediate postoperative period. A 2nd repair was attempted in 3 foals; however, dehiscence of the palate recurred. osteomyelitis of the mandibular symphysis developed in 6 animals; dehiscence of the lower lip occurred in 3 animals. Serious complications after surgery led to euthanasia or death of 5 animals. Of the 6 surviving animals, 4 did not grow normally. All survivors experienced chronic nasal discharge often contaminated with food material. Although mandibular symphysiotomy provided adequate exposure for surgical repair of cleft palate, serious complications have not been overcome.
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ranking = 9
keywords = animal
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9/12. On the natural history and comparative pathology of the blue naevus.

    In man the epidermis is the final destination for most of the melanocytes which are of neural crest origin, and they migrate to a variety of sites. Dermal melanocytic distribution, conspicuous in some lower animals, has a very restricted normal distribution in man, and of the variety of anomalies which exist the blue naevus is the most frequently encountered. It is comparable to the common melanocytoma of dog and hamster. More widespread dermal melanocytoses are rare, and a unique case in which death from melanoma supervened, recently recorded by the author, is an example of a syndrome the only parallel to which appears to be equine melanotic disease, a disorder of aging, greying horses. It is argued on comparative grounds that the newly described syndrome and equine melanotic disease are examples of a neurochristic disorder involving the cephalad segments and dermal melanocytes.
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keywords = animal
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10/12. First incidence of multilocular echinococcosis in a race horse in japan.

    Nodular hepatic lesions caused by larval echinococcus multilocularis were found in a four-year-old female thoroughbred race horse born and raised in Hokkaido. Before detection of the infection, the infected animal was transported around Honshu for racing. The present disclosure of hydatidosis in a race horse raises concern over the potential danger of spreading the infection throughout japan by horses possibly infected in Hokkaido.
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keywords = animal
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