Cases reported "Humeral Fractures"

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1/152. The spiral compression plate for proximal humeral shaft nonunion: a case report and description of a new technique.

    We present a case of humeral nonunion managed with a dynamic compression plate (DCP) contoured in a spiral fashion to preserve the deltoid muscle insertion. A forty-one-year-old woman sustained a closed proximal third humeral shaft fracture with an associated supraclavicular brachial plexus injury. She presented five months later with an atrophic nonunion of the proximal humeral shaft, inferior subluxation of the humeral head, and a resolving brachial plexopathy. Autogenous cancellous bone grafting and open reduction and internal fixation with a narrow DCP was performed. The deltoid muscle insertion was preserved by contouring the plate to fix the proximal humerus laterally over the greater tuberosity and anteriorly over the mid-humeral shaft. During the postoperative period, the humeral head reduced spontaneously. Five months after surgery, the fracture healed, and an excellent clinical result was achieved. We recommend the use of the spiral DCP for proximal shaft fractures and nonunions when preservation of the deltoid insertion is desirable.
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ranking = 1
keywords = injury
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2/152. Severance of the radial nerve complicating transverse fracture of the mid-shaft of the humerus.

    A case of radial nerve injury associated with a transverse fracture of the middle third of the humerus is reported. The radial nerve was found to be completely severed at the fracture site. Early exploration of the nerve and internal fixation of the fracture gave a satisfactory result.
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ranking = 11.777588562959
keywords = nerve injury, injury, nerve
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3/152. Sideswipe elbow fractures.

    A retrospective review of all cases of sideswipe elbow fractures (SSEFs) treated at two community hospitals from 1982 to 1992 was conducted to determine the functional outcome of the operative treatment of SSEFs. All five injuries involved the left elbow, and they included open fractures of the olecranon, the radius and ulna, the ulna and humerus, the humerus, and traumatic amputation of the arm. Concomitant injuries included three radial nerve palsies and two injuries each to the median nerve, ulnar nerve, and brachial artery. Treatment included irrigation, debridement (repeated if necessary), open reduction and internal fixation, external fixation (one case), and delayed amputation (one case). An average of 130/-10 degrees elbow flexion/extension, and 60/60 degrees supination/pronation was obtained for the three of four patients with reconstructions who returned for follow-up.
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ranking = 1.4516451688655
keywords = nerve
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4/152. Interruption of the radial nerve at proximal level: reconstruction following anterior transposition.

    The authors describe two cases of radial paralysis due to interruption in the proximal level, treated by autologous nerve grafting, following anterior transposition. At long-term follow-up, in one case after 12 years, there was good functional recovery, while in the second case there was still no recovery after 2 years. The surgical technique involving anterior transposition of the nerve is described, which in this type of lesion facilitates neurorrhaphy.
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ranking = 2.903290337731
keywords = nerve
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5/152. Nonunion of a pediatric lateral condyle fracture without ulnar nerve palsy: sixty-year follow-up.

    Displaced lateral condyle fractures in the pediatric population are usually treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Significant complications associated with the nonoperative management include nonunion, malunion, deformity, and tardy ulnar nerve palsy. However, few cases of nonunion of the lateral condyle and tardy ulnar nerve palsy with long-term follow-up have been reported. We present a radiographically documented case of a pediatric lateral condyle fracture and subsequent nonunion with significant cubitus valgus deformity without ulnar nerve palsy sixty years following injury.
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ranking = 4.3871720606862
keywords = injury, nerve
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6/152. Pediatric elbow dislocation associated with a milch type I lateral condyle fracture of the humerus.

    A Milch Type I lateral condyle fracture associated with a posterior elbow dislocation is described in a pediatric patient. Previously, Milch Type I fractures were thought to be stable injuries due to maintenance of the lateral trochlear rim. Prompt recognition and treatment are essential to avoid complications of this injury and to ensure a good functional result.
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keywords = injury
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7/152. Sonographic detection of radial nerve entrapment within a humerus fracture.

    radial neuropathy is frequently associated with fracture of the middle third of the humerus owing to the course of the nerve adjacent to the humeral shaft. The prevalence varies from 2 to 18% of humeral fractures. The therapeutic management is still controversial. Some authors recommend initial surgical exploration, whereas others prefer observation and intervention only if the injured nerve failed to recover after a period of more than 4 months. According to the literature, verification of an entrapped radial nerve in a fracture gap requires surgical exploration, but diagnostic tools to verify the existence of a pathologic condition are limited. We describe the sonographic findings of an entrapped radial nerve and review the literature regarding diagnosis and treatment of entrapped radial nerve in cases of humeral fracture.
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ranking = 4.3549355065965
keywords = nerve
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8/152. Spinal muscular atrophy variant with congenital fractures.

    A single report of brothers born to first-cousin parents with a form of acute spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and congenital fractures suggested that this combination represented a distinct form of autosomal recessive SMA. We describe a boy with hypotonia and congenital fractures whose sural nerve and muscle biopsies were consistent with a form of spinal muscular atrophy. Molecular studies identified no abnormality of the SMN(T) gene on chromosome 5. This case serves to validate the suggestion of a distinct and rare form of spinal muscular atrophy while not excluding possible X-linked inheritance.
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ranking = 0.48388172295516
keywords = nerve
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9/152. Recurrent fracture of the humerus in a softball player.

    Fracture of a normal humerus can occur during the act of throwing an object. We present the case of a young woman who sustained a spiral fracture of the distal humeral shaft with concomitant radial nerve palsy while throwing a softball and who, after clinical and radiographic evidence of bony healing, suffered a repeat humerus fracture, also while throwing a softball.
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ranking = 0.48388172295516
keywords = nerve
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10/152. radial nerve entrapment by the lateral intermuscular septum after trauma.

    radial nerve palsy is associated with humeral shaft fractures, usually occurring at the time of injury but sometimes occurring later. We report on a case in which a progressive radial nerve palsy occurred three months after a fracture; on exploration, the nerve was found to be trapped by the lateral intermuscular septum. It is important to recognize progressive radial nerve palsies or late presentations, because they often represent chronic compression and a delay in exploration may be detrimental to the return of nerve function.
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ranking = 5.3549355065965
keywords = injury, nerve
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