Cases reported "Hyperhidrosis"

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1/21. Alternating monomeric paresis with decreased skin temperature and hyperhidrosis in a case of thoracolumbar myelopathy.

    The patient, a Japanese girl with a history suggestive of diffuse encephalitis or acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, developed weakness of the right lower limb accompanied by excessive sweating and decreased skin temperature. magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar cord showed abnormal signal intensity with syrinx formation mainly at T12 to L1 vertebral level. paresis and excessive sweating subsided within 3 to 4 months, but recovery of vasomotor function was delayed. Several weeks later, weakness and skin temperature reduction reappeared on the left side without hyperhidrosis, but responded well to oral prednisolone. The patient showed no recurrence during the subsequent 7 years, and the intramedullary lesion could not be seen with repeated spinal magnetic resonance imaging.
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ranking = 1
keywords = spinal
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2/21. spinal dysraphism presenting as acro-osteolysis: report of four cases.

    The acro-osteolyses are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by bone resorption. The disorder may occur as familial, idiopathic, or secondary to vascular, inflammatory, or neurologic conditions. acro-osteolysis is rare in association with spinal dysraphism. It is even rarer for it to be the presenting symptom in spinal dysraphism. We report here four patients in whom the diagnosis of spinal dysraphism was established while investigating for the various causes of acro-osteolysis. All four patients presented with trophic changes and acro-osteolysis. hyperhidrosis in the affected limb was seen in three patients. One patient had leg pain, the others had no sensory or motor deficits. magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal dysraphism in all four patients.
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ranking = 4
keywords = spinal
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3/21. hyperhidrosis in pediatric spinal cord injury: a case report and gabapentin therapy.

    hyperhidrosis is a relatively common condition with a multitude of causes. spinal cord injury may be complicated by hyperhidrosis. Many forms of therapy have been reported for this phenomenon but few have been demonstrated to be efficacious. We describe a case of a child with hyperhidrosis from a spinal cord injury and report the first therapeutic use, to our knowledge, of gabapentin for hyperhidrosis.
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ranking = 5
keywords = spinal
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4/21. Intramedullary spinal cord gangliocytoma: case report and a review of the literature.

    We present a case of intramedullary spinal gangliocytoma in a 19-year-old woman who presented with a long history of hyperhidrosis of the face and neck areas and intermittent pain of the hands. The tumor involved the cervico-thoracic region of the spinal cord from C7-T3. The patient underwent debulking of the lesion and remains neurologically stable at two years follow-up. A discussion of this case is followed by a review of the literature surrounding this rare clinicopathological entity.
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ranking = 6
keywords = spinal
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5/21. Charcot arthropathy in relation to autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injury: case report and review of the literature.

    Charcot spinal arthropathy has been described as a late complication of spinal cord injury. In patients with these injuries in whom the spine below the level of injury is insensate, joint trauma can progress until spinal instability ensues. The authors describe the case of a 50-year-old man with complete C-8 tetraplegia who experienced a 4-month history of episodic severe headaches, profuse sweating over his face and arms, and episodic severe hypertension in addition to a "grinding" sensation in the lower back. Charcot arthropathy at the T11-12 levels with pathological mobility was demonstrated on neuroimaging. Intraoperatively, a complete spinal cord transection was identified. Anterior and posterior thoracolumbar fusion across the mobile segment resulted in complete amelioration of signs and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia. This entity, a common condition in the setting of spinal cord injury, has many triggers. Definitive treatment is targeted at the removal of the underlying cause. As demonstrated here, Charcot spinal arthropathy can act as a powerful trigger for induction of autonomic dysreflexia. Treatment of the associated spinal instability resulted in eradication of all signs and symptoms of the dysreflexia.
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ranking = 67145.358193699
keywords = autonomic dysreflexia, dysreflexia, spinal
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6/21. Renal calculi presenting as hyperhidrosis in patient with spinal cord injury.

    Renal calculi in the spinal cord injury population present a diagnostic dilemma for urologists. However, 7% of all patients with spinal cord injury will develop renal calculi. Undiagnosed stone disease can lead to significant morbidity and mortality in this population. This case demonstrates the subtlety of the presenting symptoms of renal calculi in the patient with spinal cord injury.
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ranking = 7
keywords = spinal
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7/21. myasthenia gravis, muscle twitch, hyperhidrosis and limb pain associated with thymoma: proposal of possible new myasthenic syndrome.

    We describe a 54-year-old man with myasthenia gravis, thymoma, systemic muscle twitch particularly of both lower limbs, hyperhidrosis and lower limb pain. The muscle twitch resembled to fasciculation rather than to myokymia and was persistent after discontinuation of anti-acetylcholinesterase drug. No attenuation nor disappearance of the muscle twitch was educed by spinal anesthesia. However, it disappeared when a nondepolarizing type muscle relaxant (pancuronium bromide) was used. The muscle twitch was thus considered to originate from peripheral axons. thymoma was considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of these unusual clinical manifestations which may constitute a new myasthenic syndrome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = spinal
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8/21. Management of reflex sweating in spinal cord injured patients.

    Reflex sweating can be a problem for cervical spinal cord injured patients. Patient comfort and skin breakdown have been the major concerns. Five patients were studied prospectively, using a patch containing 1.5mg of scopolamine. Patches were changed every third day. Each patient was carefully monitored before and after application of the patch for signs and symptoms of anticholinergic side effects such as dizziness, blurred vision and dry mouth. patients were also monitored for changes in patch signs before and after use, including residual urine volumes, blood pressure, heart rate, and mental status. Our study indicates that topical scopolamine successfully controlled reflex sweating in 5 patients without anticholinergic side effects.
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ranking = 5
keywords = spinal
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9/21. Orthostatic hypotension-induced autonomic dysreflexia.

    Three patients with chronic traumatic cervical myelopathy had severe orthostatic hyperhidrosis. Orthostatic challenge revealed that hypotension preceded hyperhidrosis, hypertension, and chills, all manifestations of autonomic dysreflexia. Treatment of orthostatic hypotension with fludrocortisone acetate relieved these symptoms. Therefore, orthostatic hypotension may trigger autonomic dysreflexia and the usual way of managing such patients, propping them upright, may be counterproductive.
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ranking = 63204.698104571
keywords = autonomic dysreflexia, dysreflexia
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10/21. hypertension after brain injury: case report.

    hypertension after brain injury requires comprehensive evaluation and management. Focal brain injury to centers of blood pressure regulation, high levels of circulating catecholamines from generalized trauma or intracranial lesions, increased intracranial pressure, pheochromocytomas unmasked after trauma, and occult spinal cord injury with hyperreflexia represent possible causes of hypertension after brain injury. This case of a brain-injured patient who had episodes of hypertension and diaphoresis with catecholamine elevations in plasma and urine, and evidence of hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, demonstrates the importance of a thorough neuroendocrine evaluation in brain-injured patients with hypertension. When high levels of catecholamines are found, without further evidence of a pheochromocytoma, treatment with a beta blocker is appropriate.
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ranking = 1
keywords = spinal
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