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11/55. Hyperostosis corticalis generalisata: surgical management and long-term follow-up of one patient.

    A 24-year-old woman presented for treatment of her distorted facial appearance. She showed marked widening of the face and skull, which had first become noticeable in childhood. Significant thickening of the cortical bone was seen radiographically throughout the skeleton. Routine laboratory and endocrinological tests showed normal results. These findings, together with a family history of bone disorder, led to the diagnosis of hyperostosis corticalis generalisata. The lower border of the mandible was resected, resulting in improved facial appearance. During the 8-year follow-up, no changes were seen with regard to the mandible.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyperostosis
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12/55. Cranial CT findings in sclerosteosis.

    Sclerosteosis or Van Buchem's disease is a rare genetic craniotubular hyperostosis that becomes evident in early childhood and is associated with progressive involvement of the skull. The pathologic changes in the cranium noted on CT are described in three cases. Although the disease is incurable, CT is useful to display the morbid anatomy of the cranium before palliative surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyperostosis
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13/55. Infantile cortical hyperostosis associated with the wiskott-aldrich syndrome.

    A case report of an infant with the wiskott-aldrich syndrome and clinical and radiological features of infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease) is presented. This is the third case described of the association of these two rare disorders and gives further support to the role of an immunologic defect in the pathogenesis of infantile cortical hyperostosis.
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ranking = 6
keywords = hyperostosis
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14/55. Caffey's disease: nuclear medicine and radiologic correlation: a case of mistaken identity.

    Infantile cortical hyperostosis is declining in incidence. The classical radiograph and bone scan findings have been well described. A case first mistaken for child abuse is presented. The use of bone scanning in the work-up of non-accidental trauma is addressed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyperostosis
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15/55. Schizophrenic psychosis with a tendency of systemic ossification.

    We report here a case of schizophrenic psychosis with a tendency of systemic ossification. Upon further examinations, she exhibited ossification of the spinal ligament (diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, DISH) resulting from a coappearance of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL), ossification of the yellow ligament (OYL) and ankylosing spinal hyperostosis (ASH). There have been a very few reports where a tendency of hyperostosis was observed for ossification of the spinal ligaments such as OPLL, OYL and ASH. In addition, she exhibited hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI). It appears in this case that both DISH and HFI resulted from similar ossification and exhibited respective clinical symptoms. Although it is thought that these diseases resulted from some metabolic abnormality, no abnormality was detected.
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ranking = 4
keywords = hyperostosis
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16/55. facial paralysis at the age of 2 months as a first clinical sign of van Buchem disease (endosteal hyperostosis).

    In this paper we report a 7.5-year-old physically normal boy with van Buchem disease (endosteal hyperostosis). Vague complaints of headache were the indication for X-ray examination. At the age of 2 months a left-side peripheral facial nerve palsy suddenly occurred in this boy. skull x-rays gave normal results at that age, suggesting that encroachment of the cranial nerves in van Buchem disease may occur as early as in the postnatal period, even before sclerosis of the skull has become radiologically visible.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hyperostosis
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17/55. Hyperostosis with hyperphosphatemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    This is a report of a 6-year-old girl with the rare syndrome of hyperostosis with hyperphosphatemia. Only eight cases have been previously reported. The main features of this syndrome are repeated attacks of bone pain and swelling, the radiologic finding of periosteal reaction with cortical hyperostosis, and the laboratory finding of increased serum phosphorus level with normal serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical picture, laboratory and radiological findings, and the differential diagnosis.
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ranking = 2
keywords = hyperostosis
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18/55. Dysphagia in infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey's disease): a case study.

    A four-month-old infant was treated for dysphagia associated with infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey's disease). Prolonged nutritional support was by nasal or gastrostoma intubation; therapeutic oral feeding was continued. This approach encouraged the development of oral feeding skills, infant-parent bonding and experience of oral satisfactions. The facial skeleton is the most frequent site of involvement in hyperostosis, and dysphagia is a typical component, usually signaled by refusal of food and failure to thrive.
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ranking = 6
keywords = hyperostosis
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19/55. Predominant of exclusive orbital and facial involvement in infantile cortical hyperostosis (de Toni-Caffey's disease). Report of four cases and a review of the literature.

    Four patients who presented with predominant or exclusive face and orbital involvement by de Toni-Caffey's disease are reported. Facial manifestations of infantile cortical hyperostosis may be the first and sometimes the only manifestion of the disease. A mandibular involvement is almost always present and its characteristic appearance leads to the diagnosis of de Toni-Caffey's disease.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hyperostosis
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20/55. Infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey's disease): a case report.

    An infant in hospital unexpectedly developed infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey's disease) while under-going treatment for an unrelated illness. The presentation of the disease was classic and there was marked thrombocytosis. The aetiological possibilities are discussed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hyperostosis
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