Cases reported "Hyperparathyroidism"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/179. hyperparathyroidism-an unusual case.

    A case of primary hyperparathyroidism is described that presented unusual features. The patient had been treated previously for squamous cell carcinoma of the lung and therefore it was necessary to exclude ectopic hyperparathyroidism. The results of the tests generally used to distinguish primary from ectopic hyperparathyroidism-the serum chloride level, the serum calcium response to cortisone suppression and the absence of residual or recurrent tumour-suggested that the patient did have the primary form of the disorder. Exploration of the neck revealed no parathyroid tumour or hyperplasia, and the mediastinal parathyroid adenoma was localized only by determination of parathyroid hormone in the venous drainage from the neck and mediastinum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/179. Acute extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage: case report and review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a patient with extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage and review the signs and symptoms of this condition. methods: We report a case of extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and present an overview of previously reported cases. RESULTS: A 48-year-old woman with documented primary hyperparathyroidism, who was awaiting surgical intervention, had acute onset of a neck mass, neck pain, and dysphagia. She was found to have sustained a spontaneous extracapsular hemorrhage of a parathyroid adenoma. hypercalcemia persisted, and she subsequently underwent curative parathyroidectomy for the primary hyperparathyroidism. We also identified 15 previously reported cases of extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage and summarized the most common manifestations-most notably, a neck mass or swelling, ecchymoses of the neck and chest, dysphagia, neck pain, hoarseness, and dyspnea. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should be aware of the potential for occurrence of extracapsular parathyroid hemorrhage in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. When this condition occurs, severe hypercalcemia or acute hypocalcemia may be present. hypercalcemia is often persistent; however, autoinfarction of the parathyroid adenoma is possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/179. Genetic analysis of a papillary thyroid carcinoma in a patient with MEN1.

    BACKGROUND: MENI is an inherited tumor syndrome characterized by the development of tumors of the parathyroid, the anterior pituitary and the pancreatic islets. Tumors of these endocrine glands in MEN1 patients demonstrate loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the locus of the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene. Menin, the protein encoded by the MEN1 gene, is ubiquitously expressed in endocrine tissue, and less commonly these patients can present with tumors of other endocrine tissues, including thyroid and adrenal. We hypothesize that MEN1 gene mutation may be involved in the oncogenesis of other less common tumors. methods: We report a MEN1 patient who was found to have metastatic papillary thyroid cancer at the time of neck exploration for hyperparathyroidism. Genetic analysis of tumor tissue was performed using one intragenic (D11S4946) and two flanking (D11S4945 and D11S4940) polymorphic markers. RESULTS: Two of the markers were informative. Consistent with previous studies, there was LOH in the parathyroid adenoma identified with the intragenic marker D11S4946. However, the papillary cancer was found to be heterozygous at two informative markers. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of obvious LOH of the MEN1 locus in the papillary cancer suggests that, in contrast to parathyroid adenoma, deletion of the MEN1 tumor suppressor gene is not etiologically related to the oncogenesis of the papillary cancer in this patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/179. Video-assisted parathyroidectomy by a skin-lifting method for primary hyperparathyroidism.

    OBJECTIVE: The use of endoscopic surgical procedures has rapidly spread to abdominal and thoracic surgeries and subsequently to surgeries of the neck region. Several surgeons initiated endoscopic parathyroidectomy using CO2 insufflation to create the working space; however, they reported various complications. We describe here a skin-lifting method that may have few complications. methods: A 65-year-old man was diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism due to a solitary adenoma of the left inferior parathyroid gland. A 3-cm oblique incision was made below the left clavicle, and a 5-mm incision was made on the lateral neck. After the skin was lifted up, we performed video-assisted parathyroidectomy. RESULTS: Parathyroid extirpation took 2 hours and blood loss was minimal. The patient had minimal pain and no complications postoperatively. serum concentrations of calcium and intact parathyroid hormone were normalized on the next day. CONCLUSION: Using the skin-lifting method, we obtained a sufficient operative view and encountered no complications. This procedure is cosmetically desirable, and we consider it a feasible alternative for the treatment of parathyroid adenoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/179. Familial isolated parathyroid adenoma in a consanguineous family.

    The 23-year-old Caucasian male propositus presented with symptomatic hypercalcemia, hypophosphatemia and normocalciuria for 2 months. His 29-year-old brother had undergone an operation for recurrent parathyroid adenoma at age 26 and 28. No other member of the family was affected. His father and mother were second-degree relatives. Laboratory studies showed primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT), while the remaining endocrine studies and genetic testing for multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 and 2A were normal. technetium-cardiolite scintigraphy and ultrasound scans revealed a parathyroid mass at the left lower neck. Apart from bilateral hearing loss due to gentamicin treatment as a pre-term child, the patient was in of good health. Signs or symptoms of other endocrinopathies were absent. The patient was referred for parathyroidectomy with subsequent autotransplantation of the remaining glands into his sternocleidomastoid muscle. Histological examination revealed an adenoma with oncocytic differentiation, similar to that seen in his brother. The disease may follow a recessive mode of inheritance or may be due to a dominant germ-cell mutation in one of the parents. The presented case may ultimately help in elucidating the molecular genetic basis of this rare form of pHPT.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/179. Parathyroid carcinoma: problems in diagnosis and the need for radical surgery even in recurrent disease.

    INTRODUCTION: From 1986 to 1999 we operated on 963 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). methods AND RESULTS: Parathyroid carcinoma was diagnosed clinically and histologically in four patients (0.4%). In two of these patients diagnosis of parathyroid cancer was delayed by misinterpretation of the histopathology leading to an autotransplantation of malignant parathyroid tissue in one case. In two patients multivisceral surgery was performed: beside thyroidectomy, neck dissection, tracheal wall resection and resection of the muscular layer of the oesophagus one patient received oesophagectomy and gastric transposition and one patient a lung wedge resection. Both patients had a temporary palliation of tumour-associated symptoms after multivisceral surgery. The first patient died 2 years after oesophagectomy and 12 years after primary diagnosis from local tumour recurrence and cachexia. The second patient is living with tumour recurrence presenting a serum calcium level of 4.2 mmol/l (normal range 2.0 to 2.5 mol/l) and multiple brown tumours 2 years after lung resection and 6 years after the primary diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that parathyroid carcinomas, being difficult to diagnose, warrant radical surgery, including multivisceral resection to prolong survival and reduce tumour and hypercalcaemia associated symptoms. copyright Harcourt Publishers Limited.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/179. Parathyromatosis: a cause for recurrent hyperparathyroidism.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of parathyromatosis as a cause for recurrent hyperparathyroidism. methods: We present the case history, laboratory results, operative interventions, and pathologic findings in a 36-year-old woman. Relevant reports from the literature are reviewed. RESULTS: Our patient, who had been undergoing long-term hemodialysis because of renal failure, presented with secondary hyperparathyroidism and progressive bone pain. After an uneventful subtotal parathyroidectomy (removal of 3-1/2 glands), her symptoms resolved in conjunction with normalization of parathyroid hormone levels. Subsequently, however, recurrent hyperparathyroidism and severe bone pain necessitated second and third neck explorations, during which parathyromatosis was discovered. A total thyroidectomy was performed because of the bilateral nature of the disease. Postoperatively, the patient's bone pain resolved substantially, although her parathyroid hormone levels remained high. CONCLUSION: Parathyromatosis is a rare cause of recurrent hyperparathyroidism after parathyroidectomy. It consists of hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissues scattered throughout the neck, due either to intraoperative tissue spillage and subsequent implantation or to hyperplasia of parathyroid rests from embryologic development. This is one of the few case reports of parathyromatosis and the first case report of a mixed form of the disease, consisting of features of both subcapsular parathyroid rests and extracapsular implantation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/179. Biomarkers and imaging in non-malignant and malignant osteomalacia.

    Deoxypyridinium (DPD) cross-links are a specific parameter for collagen type i degradation. We report the longitudinal tracking of DPD in relation to other bone markers and imaging techniques in a patient with osteomalacia and secondary hyperparathyroidism from reduced light exposure due to attire. This patient was first admitted for diffuse skeletal pain. x-rays showed general demineralization and Looser's transformation zones in the neck of the left femur. MRI examinations of the pelvis and the proximal femora demonstrated bilateral signs of acute sacroiliitis, as well as edema-like lesions in the femoral heads and necks bilaterally. The baseline parathyroid hormone level was 8 times higher than the normal upper limit, whereas 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels were significantly reduced. A 7-fold increase in free urinary DPD and a 17-fold increase in bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bone-AP) were also measured. Percutaneous transiliac bone biopsy revealed markedly increased osteoidosis. osteomalacia was diagnosed due to chronically reduced sun exposure caused by restrictive attire, and cholecalciferol substitution therapy was begun. After a follow-up of 28 weeks, non-specific parameters of bone turnover (parathyroid hormone, total alkaline phosphatase, serum calcium and serum phosphate) had normalized, while DPD, as a specific bone degradation marker, and bone-AP, as a bone formation parameter, both remained elevated. This example underlines the validity of DPD and bone-AP as indicators of increased bone metabolism: not only were they the parameters with the highest baseline deviation, but they were also the last to normalize.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/179. Ectopic primary hyperparathyroidism.

    OBJECTIVE: To review an unusual case of ectopic primary hyperparathyroidism. methods: We present a case report, including longitudinal results of laboratory studies, and comment on the difficulties with standard imaging techniques, interpretation of parathyroid pathologic findings, and use of invasive localization techniques. RESULTS: A 74-year-old woman underwent repeated assessments because of hypercalcemia. When standard parathyroid 99mTc sestamibi imaging was negative for adenoma and initial surgical exploration of the neck and removal of 3' parathyroid glands were unsuccessful in correcting the hyperparathyroidism, the ectopic adenoma was ultimately localized on an extended-field 99mTc sestamibi scan in the region of the right dome of the diaphragm. The localization was confirmed by selective venous sampling and angiography. The ectopic parathyroid adenoma was embolized, and 1 month later, the serum calcium level was normal. CONCLUSION: Ectopic lesions should be considered when standard imaging techniques are nonrevealing and standard neck exploration fails to disclose a parathyroid adenoma in a patient with persistent hypercalcemia. Selective venous sampling and angiography can assist in localization of ectopic parathyroid adenomas.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/179. Brown tumor of the maxilla associated with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    Brown tumors represent the terminal stage of the remodeling processes during primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism. During the last three decades primary hyperparathyroidism has been recognized much more commonly and the increase has generally been attributed to the routine determination of calcium by new automated methods and the advent of new and more objective parathyroid hormone radioimmunoassay techniques. early diagnosis and successful treatment of the disease have made clinical evidence of bone disease uncommon. While, the mandible is the most frequently involved bone in the head and neck region, maxillary involvement is extremely rare. A case of brown tumor on the maxilla associated with primary hyperparathyroidism is reported. This patient presented multiple skeletal lesions, which are uncommonly seen nowadays. The diagnosis was suggested by the clinical history and confirmed by biochemical, radiological and histopathological determinations. Excision of a parathyroid adenoma normalized the metabolic status. Excision of the maxillary mass led both histopathological confirmation of the disease and early masticator rehabilitation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hyperparathyroidism'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.