Cases reported "Hyperpigmentation"

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21/24. Histochemical and ultrastructural study of diffuse melanoderma after bone marrow transplantation.

    hyperpigmentation is a well-recognized feature of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and is usually restricted to sites where lichenoid or sclerodermiform lesions have occurred. Since 1975, two of 745 patients treated by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in our institution have developed diffuse melanoderma which differed considerably from the classic presentations. They both developed acute GVHD, then lichen planus-like chronic lesions and diffuse melanoderma. histology of biopsies of the pigmented skin showed intense pigment deposition in the basal and suprabasal layers, and in dermal macrophages. On split-dopa, melanocyte counts were 98 and 93 per field, respectively. Electron microscopy showed melanocytes protruding into the dermis, and dark melanosomes in all epidermal layers and in macrophages. These findings were suggestive of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. In bone marrow recipients, de novo melanoderma is a rare event which could represent a feature of cutaneous GVHD in pigmented subjects.
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ranking = 1
keywords = macrophage, bone
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22/24. Bony anomalies in a patient with reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura.

    Reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura [RAPK] is a rare pigmentary genodermatosis. This is a case report of a 23-year-old Saudi female who started manifesting the disorder in the 2nd decade. The patient had bony abnormalities in the form of absence of terminal phalanges of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th toes. These bone anomalies are extremely rare, and the association has never been described before in the literature.
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ranking = 0.002010191748646
keywords = bone
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23/24. Fatal interstitial pulmonary disease in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Chronic restrictive lung disease in a 9-year-old boy with dyskeratosis congenita (DC) 7 years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is described. When he was 1 year and 10 months old, severe aplastic anemia developed. He received a marrow transplant from his HLA serologically identical, but HLA-DP mismatched brother. He developed grade II acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and thereafter chronic GVHD of progressive type, and was treated with both prednisolone and azathioprine resulting in clinical improvement. Thereafter he complained of dyspnea, and bilateral noncircumscribed interstitial shadows on chest CT scan were present. His pulmonary function showed restrictive changes. prednisolone was not effective and he died of respiratory failure. Post-mortem examination confirmed interstitial fibrosis, lymphocytic infiltration of the bronchioles and alveoli with luminal fibrosis. There was no evidence of chronic GVHD in the skin and the liver. These findings raise the possibility that this pulmonary complication was associated with DC itself.
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ranking = 0.01005095874323
keywords = bone
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24/24. Reticulate postinflammatory hyperpigmentation with band-like mucin deposition.

    BACKGROUND: mucinoses of the skin are a group of disorders sharing accumulation of mucin in the skin or hair follicles. Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, with pigmentary incontinence, is due to loss of melanin from epidermal basal cells and its accumulation in dermal macrophages. methods: We describe clinicopathologic features of two patients presenting with the association of pigmentary incontinence with an unusual diffuse, band-like dermal deposition of mucin, clinically presenting with reticular pigmented macular lesions. RESULTS: Two patients were observed with asymptomatic, persistent, reticular, pigmented patches located in the flexures, thighs, neck and back. histology showed melanophages with a diffuse, band-like dermal deposition of mucin, an increased number of fibroblasts, a slight T-cell infiltrate and scattered mast cells. blood markers of lupus erythematosus were negative. CONCLUSIONS: These findings may draw attention to pigmentary disorders such as lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans, pigmentatio maculos eruptiva idiopathica, dermatopathia pigmentosa reticularis, prurigo pigmentosa and frictional melanosis. None of these entities, however, includes mucin deposition among its microscopic features. Macules were not preceded by erythema or any other lesions. We suggest that our cases could belong to group II of Rongioletti and Rebora's classification, i.e. they could be cases of secondary mucin deposition in postinflammatory hyperpigmentation, possibly in an unusual form of lichen planus pigmentosus or, less likely, frictional melanosis.
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ranking = 0.49396942475406
keywords = macrophage
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