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1/56. Cockroach allergy and asthma in a 30-year-old man.

    A growing body of evidence has implicated allergens derived from cockroaches as an important environmental factor that may aggravate asthma in sensitized persons. We present the case of a 30-year-old man with asthma and a cockroach allergy. Allergy skin testing confirmed hypersensitivity to cockroach extract, and a home visit revealed visual evidence of infestation and the presence of Bla g 1 German cockroach allergen in vacuumed dust. As is typical of patients with a cockroach allergy and asthma, multiple factors in addition to cockroach allergen appeared to aggravate the patient's asthma. A multimodality therapeutic regimen, which included medications as well as cleaning of the home, integrated pest management, and professional application of chemical controls, resulted in substantial clinical improvement. The pathophysiology, epidemiology, and clinical features of cockroach-allergic asthma are reviewed, and an approach to diagnosis and management is suggested.
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2/56. Occupational asthma and IgE sensitization to cellulase in a textile industry worker.

    BACKGROUND: Although there have been a few reports of occupational asthma due to cellulase in several occupational settings, this is the first case of cellulase-induced occupational asthma in an employee working in the textile industry. Its pathogenetic mechanism remains to be further clarified. OBJECTIVE: It is important to alert physicians to the possibility of occupational asthma caused by cellulase in workers of the textile industry. methods AND RESULTS: The patient had atopy and strong positive responses to cellulase extract on skin prick tests. Bronchoprovocation test showed an early asthmatic response to cellulase extract. serum specific IgE and specific IgG4 antibodies to cellulase were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In order to further characterize the allergenic component of the extract, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and electroblotting studies were performed. Eight IgE binding components ranging from 6 to 97.5 kD were detected within the cellulase extract. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that inhalation of cellulase can induce IgE-mediated bronchoconstrictions in employees working in the textile industry.
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3/56. urticaria from beer: an immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to a 10-kDa protein derived from barley.

    BACKGROUND: urticaria from beer has been reported in atopic patients. In these subjects, the skin-prick test positivity to and presence of specific serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E for barley malt, the basic ingredient used in brewing, suggested a type I hypersensitivity to barley component(s). OBJECTIVE: To identify the beer allergen(s) and to investigate the presence of related proteins in barley. methods: Three patients with urticaria from beer and other atopic people, some of them suffering from baker's asthma, were examined for both prick test sensitivity to and the occurrence of serum-specific IgE for partially purified proteins from beer. Allergen identification in beer, malt and barley was performed by immunoblotting. RESULTS: skin-prick tests and detection of specific IgE by both solid-phase (RAST) and liquid-phase (AlaSTAT) assays demonstrated that the 5-20-kDa beer protein fraction contained the allergen. Immunoblot analysis with sera of patients with urticaria from beer showed that IgE bound only the 10-kDa protein band in beer and malt, whereas a main 16-kDa protein was revealed in barley in addition to a very faint 10-kDa band. With the serum of a patient suffering from baker's asthma no IgE binding bands were observed in beer, whereas specific IgE binding to several proteins, including a major 16-kDa component, were detected for both malt and barley. CONCLUSIONS: urticaria from beer is an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction induced by a protein component of approximately 10 kDa deriving from barley. This allergen does not seem to be related to the major barley 16-kDa allergen responsible for baker's asthma. Because of the severity of the allergic manifestations to beer we recommend testing atopic patients positive to malt/barley and/or who exhibit urticarial reactions after drinking beer for their sensitivity to this beverage.
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4/56. Respiratory allergy to mushroom spores: not well recognized, but relevant.

    BACKGROUND: Although basidiospores are a major component of the air spora in many parts of the world, their clinical significance as triggers of respiratory allergy has rarely been demonstrated. Therefore, the class of basidiomycetes as an aeroallergen is not well known. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a cause and effect relationship between respiratory allergy and basidiospores, we illustrate this case report of a 38-year-old housewife. methods: skin prick test, immunoblot, and active anterior rhinomanometry were used as diagnostic tools to verify specific reactivity of a pleurotus pulmonalis spore extract. Two atopic subjects served as controls. RESULTS: The skin prick test positive study subject reacted with subjective and objective signs including a significant drop of the FEV1 by nasal challenge at a concentration of 0.1 mg/mL of the pleurotus spore extract while both controls were negative even at a higher test concentration. IgE-immunoblot revealed several distinct bands in the serum of the pleurotus-sensitized subject. CONCLUSION: spores of pleurotus pulmonalis, a common mushroom of the fungal class of basidiomycetes, can cause specific, IgE-mediated acute rhinoconjuncivitis and asthma in sensitized individuals.
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5/56. Rush immunotherapy in a dog with severe ragweed and grass pollen allergy.

    BACKGROUND: Forty years of study of naturally occurring IgE-mediated allergy in animals is briefly reviewed. These studies provided models for study of bioactive mediators and innovative pharmacologic therapies for IgE-mediated asthma. Objective: Based on our experience with canine allergy we evaluated and treated a dog with severe grass and ragweed allergy whose allergic dermatitis was uncontrolled by H1 blockers and topical corticosteroids. The dog was miserable during the chicago grass and ragweed pollen seasons. methods: Rush immunotherapy was initiated during the ragweed season of 1997. RESULTS: Dramatic improvement was seen which persisted through the grass and ragweed seasons of 1998 after maintenance immunotherapy. CONCLUSION: The case is presented not as a model for canine immunotherapy but as an example of how animal research can be of value to both animals and humans.
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6/56. fever, rash and worsening of asthma in response to intravenous hydrocortisone.

    We describe a case of a hypersensitivity reaction to intravenous hydrocortisone in a 64-year-old female with asthma, and briefly review other cases.
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7/56. Two year follow-up of a garbage collector with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA).

    BACKGROUND: Separate collection of biodegradable garbage and recyclable waste is expected to become mandatory in some western countries. A growing number of persons engaged in garbage collection and separation might become endangered by high loads of bacteria and fungi. Case history and examination A 29 year old garbage collector involved in emptying so-called biological garbage complained of dyspnea, fever, and flu-like symptoms during work beginning in the summer of 1992. Chest x-ray showed streaky shadows near both hili reaching into the upper regions. IgE- and IgG-antibodies (CAP, Pharmacia, sweden) were strongly positive for aspergillus fumigatus with 90.5 kU/L and 186%, respectively. Total-IgE was also strongly elevated with 5430 kU/L. Bronchial challenge testing with commercially available aspergillus fumigatus extract resulted in an immediate-type asthmatic reaction. Two years later he was still symptomatic and antibodies persisted at lower levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our diagnosis was allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) including asthmatic responses as well as hypersensitivity pneumonitis (extrinsic allergic alveolitis) due to exposure to moldy household waste. A growing number of persons engaged in garbage collection and handling are exposed and at risk to develop sensitization to fungi due to exposure to dust of biodegradable waste. Further studies are necessary to show if separate collection of biodegradable waste increases the health risks due to exposure to bacteria and fungi in comparison to waste collection without separation.
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8/56. Occupational IgE-mediated allergy to tribolium confusum (confused flour beetle).

    BACKGROUND: We report on IgE-mediated allergy in a worker caused by tribolium confusum (confused flour beetle). These beetles lived in the "old" flour to which he was exposed in his work. CASE REPORT: A 35-year-old, nonatopic mechanic in a rye crispbread factory developed rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthmatic symptoms, as well as urticaria on his wrists, lower arms, hands, neck, and face, during the maintenance and repair of machines contaminated by flour. This flour had been in and on the machines for a long time, and it contained small beetles. The patient did not suffer any symptoms when handling fresh, clean flour. RESULTS: skin prick tests with standard environmental allergens, storage mites, enzymes, flours, and molds were negative. A prick test with flour from the machines gave a 10-mm reaction. An open application of the same flour caused urticarial whealing on the exposed skin. Prick tests with fresh flour from the factory were negative. A prick test with minced T. confusum from the flour in the machines gave a 7-mm reaction. histamine hydrochloride 10 mg/ml gave a 7-mm reaction. Specific serum IgE antibodies to T. confusum were elevated at 17.2 kU/l. Prick tests with the flour from the machines were negative in five control patients. CONCLUSIONS: The patient had occupational contact urticaria, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthmatic symptoms from exposure to flour. His symptoms were caused by immediate allergy to the beetle T. confusum. Immediate allergy to this beetle has rarely been reported in connection with respiratory symptoms, but it may be more common. Contact urticaria from this source has not been reported before.
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9/56. asthma and rhinitis induced by exposure to raw green beans and chards.

    BACKGROUND: Although the vast majority of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods occurs through ingestion, a few cases of unexpected allergic reactions to foods may occur through the exposure to airborne food allergen particles. methods: case reports. skin prick tests and serum-specific IgE (CAP-FEIA) were used to identify specific IgE antibodies. bronchial provocation tests were performed to determine the clinical relevance of inhaled exposure to raw and cooked green beans and raw chards. After demonstrating specific reactivity to them, SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting of raw and cooked green beans were carried out to identify relevant antigens. RESULTS: Three women developed bronchial asthma and rhinitis after exposure to raw green beans, and one of them also when exposed to raw chards. All women tolerated ingestion of green beans. patients reported multiple episodes while handling these vegetables for cooking activities. Allergy to green beans and chards was demonstrated by skin testing and serum-specific IgE. Bronchial challenge test with these allergens showed positive responses to raw, but not cooked, green beans and chards. Oral food challenges with green beans (raw and cooked) and chards were negative in all patients. In order to further characterize the allergenic components of these extracts, SDS-PAGE and electroblotting studies were also performed. Immunoblots of raw and cooked green beans extract showed two IgE-binding bands with apparent molecular weights of 41.1 and 70.6 kD. Interestingly, a 47-kD IgE-binding protein was detected only in raw green bean extracts. CONCLUSIONS: We report three patients who developed asthma and rhinitis caused by exposure to raw, but not to cooked, green beans and chards in a non-occupational environment. Only minor differences of IgE reactivity between nitrocellulose-blotted raw and boiled green bean extract were found.
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10/56. IgE-mediated occupational asthma induced by herbal medicine, Banha (pinellia ternata).

    There have been few reported cases of occupational asthma induced by pinellia ternata (Banha), and the mechanism responsible for this type of asthma is still undetermined. We report a case of Banha-induced occupational asthma with IgE-mediated mechanism. The patient had positive skin responses to Banha extract and Banha-specific bronchial challenge elicited an early asthmatic response. The serum-specific IgE binding to Banha extract was detectable and completely inhibited with the additions of 0.1 microg/mL of Banha extract on ELISA inhibition. Seven IgE binding components to Banha extract (6.5, 22, 24, 32, 34, and 48 kDa) were detected using SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analysis. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that P. ternata (Banha)-derived allergens are able to cause IgE-mediated bronchoconstriction in exposed workers.
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