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11/26. Buckwheat anaphylaxis: an unusual allergen in taiwan.

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to buckwheat is common in korea, japan, and some other Asian countries. However, buckwheat is not a common allergen in taiwan. We report a woman with asthma who had anaphylactic shock, generalized urticaria, and an acute exacerbation of asthma five minutes after ingesting buckwheat. The patient underwent skin prick and Pharmacia CAP testing (Uppsala, sweden) for specific IgE to buckwheat, white sesame and soybean as well as other common allergens in taiwan including dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), D. farinae (Df), cat and dog dander, cockroach, egg white, cow milk and codfish. The patient had a strongly positive skin prick test response to buckwheat and positive reactions to Dp and latex. Specific IgE results were class 6 for buckwheat, class 4 for Dp and Df, and class 2 for dog dander, wheat, sesame and soybean. Results of an open food challenge with white sesame and soybean were negative. Although buckwheat is a rare allergen in taiwan, it can cause extremely serious reactions and should be considered in patients presenting with anaphylaxis after exposure to buckwheat.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bean
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12/26. Occupational asthma caused by brazil ginseng dust.

    The inhalation of different substances of plant origin can cause immediate and late onset asthma. The list of these agents responsible for such reactions is continuously increasing. We discuss a patient who developed symptoms of asthma after exposure to Pfaffia paniculata root powder used in the manufacturing of brazil ginseng capsules. Airway hyperreactivity was confirmed by a positive bronchial challenge to methacholine. Sensitivity to this dust was confirmed by immediate skin test reactivity, a positive bronchial challenge (immediate response), and the presence of specific IgE detected by ELISA technique to an aqueous extract. The bronchial response was inhibited by sodium cromoglycate. Unexposed subjects did not exhibit reactivity to this ginseng extract with any of the tests referred to above. The same study performed with Korean ginseng (panax ginseng) elicited negative results. This study is the first, to our knowledge, that links ginseng-root dust to occupational asthma.
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ranking = 0.0082433734969665
keywords = plant
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13/26. Long-lasting contact urticaria. Type I and type IV allergy from castor bean and a hypothesis of systemic IgE-mediated allergic dermatitis.

    A unique urticarial type I patch-test reaction to castor bean that persisted for more than 48 hours and was followed by a delayed type IV reaction is described. Immunohistochemical and electron microscopic observations indicated involvement of eosinophils and IgE receptors on Langerhans' cells. The authors present a scheme for the role of Langerhans' cells in skin allergy.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = bean
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14/26. Occupational asthma caused by guar gum.

    Some vegetable gums have been reported to cause asthma. We describe three subjects who were exposed at work to guar gum, which is derived from the outer part of Cyanopsis tetragonolobus, a vegetable that grows in india. The first subject worked for a pharmaceutical company; the second and third subjects worked at a carpet-manufacturing plant. All three subjects developed symptoms of rhinitis and asthma after the onset of exposure to guar gum. All subjects were atopic and demonstrated mild bronchial hyperresponsiveness to inhaled histamine at the time they were observed. skin prick tests demonstrated an immediate skin reaction to guar gum. All three subjects had high levels of serum IgE antibodies to guar gum. Specific inhalation challenges in which the three subjects were exposed for short intervals (less than or equal to 4 minutes) to powder of guar gum elicited isolated immediate bronchospastic reactions in two subjects and a dual reaction in the other subject.
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ranking = 0.0082433734969665
keywords = plant
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15/26. Immediate and late onset asthma from occupational exposure to soybean dust.

    Most patients sensitive to soybean experience gastrointentinal symptoms, urticaria, angioedema, and asthma after ingestion. However, we report here a previously non-allergic patient who developed immediate and late onset asthma after breathing soybean flour used in the manufacture of food supplements. She exhibited positive immediate and late skin test sensitivity as well as a positive bronchial challenge to a soybean flour extract. In contrast to another patient with an anaphylactic response after soybean ingestion, the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) to soybean antigen was negative in our patient.
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ranking = 3
keywords = bean
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16/26. Occupational allergy in horticulture: demonstration of immediate-type allergic reactivity to freesia and paprika plants.

    patients A and M developed allergic symptoms when working in a greenhouse with paprika plants and freesia plants, respectively. The possible involvement of an IgE-mediated mechanism was investigated with the skin prick test, radioallergosorbent test (RAST) and the histamine release test (HRT). Paprika flower, leaf and stem extract released 58, 47 and 43% of the total amount of histamine from washed leukocytes of patient A. In serum A IgE antibodies against paprika leaves and flowers could be demonstrated by RAST (11% binding of 125I-anti-IgE added). Freesia flower and stem extract released 46 and 43% histamine, respectively, from washed leukocytes of patient M. In the RAST, specific IgE antibodies against freesia flowers and stems were found in serum M (37% binding of 125I-anti-IgE added).
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ranking = 0.049460240981799
keywords = plant
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17/26. Transfer of latent atopy by bone marrow transplantation? A case report.

    A previously healthy 8-year old girl was diagnosed with acute myelogenous leukemia, and, while she was in first remission, she received a bone marrow transplant from her atopic brother. Studies 1 to 2 years after transplantation revealed that the marrow recipient had a specific-IgE production of donor-type pattern, indicated by the similar skin prick test results and RAST scores in the donor and recipient demonstrating allergy to animal dander and house dust. The recipient's own immunity had been destroyed by the preparative regimen for marrow transplantation, and no lymphoid cells of host origin could be found after transplantation in the chromosome analysis. A sensitization of the recipient to animal dander after transplantation was very unlikely because no animal contacts were present, and the chronic liver graft-versus-host disease of the patient additionally suggested a delayed immunologic recovery. The case history suggests that atopy can be transferred by bone marrow transplantation from donor to recipient. A possible mechanism appears to be a passive transfer not only of lymphoid precursors but also of mature memory cells within the bone marrow inoculum. The donor memory B cells are presumably capable of starting specific-IgE production when the cells are stimulated in the host environment by factors still unknown.
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ranking = 0.082433734969665
keywords = plant
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18/26. Allergic reactions to enzymes used in plant cloning experiments.

    We report a case of rhinitis and asthma resulting from exposure to enzymes used in an experimental plant pathology laboratory. Immediate skin-test responses were elicited to both "cellulase" and "Macerozyme" products, and a large late onset skin reaction occurred at the cellulase site beginning in 6 hr. Special radioallergosorbent test (RAST) substrates were prepared that showed a strong positive response to cellulase. By the RAST method other laboratory workers were screened and another symptomatic individual was found who also showed evidence of type I hypersensitivity to both enzymes. skin biopsy and immunodiffusion data are presented. We conclude that enzymes used to digest cell wall structures of plants are capable of eliciting both immediate and late onset skin-test reactions and positive RAST responses in susceptible persons. These reactions are thought to be mediated by IgE antibodies and can be associated with symptoms of rhinitis and asthma.
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ranking = 0.049460240981799
keywords = plant
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19/26. Occupational sensitization to Plasmopara viticola.

    Molds of the class of oomycetes are of allergologic importance in special cases. However, probes are not commercially available for diagnostic purposes. Our case report is based on the medical history of a greenhouse worker who had atopic syndrome. He handled pure cultures of defined fungi and plants. A sensitization to pseudo mildew growing on grapevine (Plasmopara viticola) was found. skin prick test and histamine release test results were positive when extract of P. viticola was used. Detection of IgE reactivities against pseudo mildew via binding tests, Western blot analysis, and isoelectric focusing immunoblot confirmed the diagnosis. To our knowledge these results demonstrate for the second time a sensitization to oomycetes.
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ranking = 0.0082433734969665
keywords = plant
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20/26. Occupational allergy caused by spathe flower (Spathiphyllum wallisii).

    Occupational allergy caused by plants is seldom reported although it is probably relatively common. We report on a 22-year-old male atopic caretaker of plants who developed IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis, laryngitis, pharyngitis, and contact and generalized urticaria caused by exposure to spathe flower (Spathiphyllum wallisii) while he was working for a firm that supplied plants to offices. He also had an asthmatic attack at work, but in bronchial provocation tests conducted 8 months after he had stopped doing the work in question, he developed rhinoconjunctivitis, pharyngitis, and laryngitis, but exhibited neither bronchial reaction nor fall in PEF values. Prick tests with spathe flower gave 3 reactions for exudates from the flower, pollen, stem, and leaves. He also had several positive reactions to fruits, vegetables, and spices, but not to natural rubber latex. The radioallergosorbent test with spathe flower was positive (3.4 PRU/ml, close to class 3). In protein staining with SDS-PAGE, one heavy band was detected at about 14 kDa, and other faint bands were visible on both sides. Six faint bands were detected at the mol. mass range of 30-67 kDa. In IgE immunoblotting, one heavy band was detected at about 14 kDa. The patient became symptomless after he had ceased working with plants.
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ranking = 0.032973493987866
keywords = plant
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