Cases reported "Hypertension, Portal"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. splenectomy in a case of splenic vein thrombosis unmasks essential thrombocythemia.

    We report a patient with splenic vein thrombosis (SVT) in whom splenectomy resulted in the unmasking of essential thrombocythemia (ET). He had portal hypertension with haematemesis, resulting in anaemia requiring repeated blood transfusions. Investigations revealed SVT. Following splenectomy, he suffered a transient ischaemic attack episode, associated with persistent thrombocytosis (> 2000 x 10(9)/l). Other myeloproliferative disorders were excluded and a diagnosis of ET was established. He responded to hydroxyurea but, due to financial constraints, he discontinued treatment and subsequently relapsed. The association of ET with SVT is rare and the diagnosis of ET was missed initially as the platelet count was normal prior to splenectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. Splenic arteriovenous fistula and sudden onset of portal hypertension as complications of a ruptured splenic artery aneurysm: Successful treatment with transcatheter arterial embolization. A case study and review of the literature.

    Splenic arteriovenous fistula (SAVF) accounts for an unusual but well-documented treatable cause of portal hypertension([1-4]). A case of a 50-year-old multiparous female who developed suddenly portal hypertension due to SAVF formation is presented. The patient suffered from repeated episodes of haematemesis and melaena during the past twelve days and thus was emergently admitted to hospital for management. Clinical and laboratory investigations established the diagnosis of portal hypertension in the absence of liver parenchymal disease. endoscopy revealed multiple esophageal bleeding varices. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and transfemoral celiac arteriography documented the presence of a tortuous and aneurysmatic splenic artery and premature filling of an enlarged splenic vein, findings highly suggestive of an SAVF. The aforementioned vascular abnormality was successfully treated with percutaneous transcatheter embolization. Neither recurrence nor other complications were observed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. Post traumatic intra thoracic spleen presenting with upper GI bleed!--a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Isolated splenic vein thrombosis with left sided portal hypertension is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed. diagnosis is difficult and requires a high index of suspicion, especially in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleed in the presence of splenomegaly and normal liver function tests. CASE PRESENTATION: A 64 year old male presented with haematemesis and melaena. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the presence of antral erosions in the stomach and fundal varices. A computerised tomography scan of abdomen confirmed the presence of a diaphragmatic tear and the spleen to be lying in the left hemi thorax. The appearances of the splenic vein on the scan were consistent with thrombosis. CONCLUSION: Left sided portal hypertension as a result of isolated splenic vein thrombosis secondary to trauma is rare. The unusual presentation of our case, splenic herniation into the left hemithorax, causing fundal varices leading to upper gastrointestinal bleed 28 years after the penetrating injury, makes this case most interesting. We believe that this has not been reported in literature before.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. Portal hypertension complicating abdominal tuberculosis. Case report.

    Two cases of abdominal tuberculosis complicated by portal hypertension are reported. Both presented with haematemesis, melaena, night sweats, anorexia and weight loss. Tuberculous lymph nodes at the porta hepatis compressed the portal vein in one case, and the other had disseminated tuberculosis involving the liver and spleen. The mechanism of such portal hypertension is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. Development of the Cruveilhier-Baumgarten syndrome after endoscopic obliteration of oesophageal varices. Report of a case.

    A patient with post-necrotic liver cirrhosis, presenting with recurrent haematemesis and melena due to oesophageal varices, received repeated endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. The Cruveilhier-Baumgarten syndrome developed 11 months after variceal obliteration. Neither rebleeding nor recurrence of varices was observed during a follow up period of 12 months after obliteration of varices.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. Variceal bleeding caused by segmental portal hypertension in association with situs inversus and malrotation.

    An 18-year-old, previously healthy, woman was admitted to hospital because of haematemesis. endoscopy showed large varices in the fundus of the stomach. Further investigations revealed segmental portal hypertension caused by situs inversus of the spleen. The case illustrates the importance of considering causes other than liver diseases in variceal bleeding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. Myelofibrosis, splenomegaly, and portal hypertension.

    A patient with chronic myelofibrosis and massive splenomegaly developed portal hypertension with haematemesis occurring from radiologically proven oesophageal varices. Transjugular liver biopsy showed only myeloid metaplasia, and radiological evaluation of the portal vascular system was undertaken to establish a diagnosis of hyperkinetic portal hypertension as a basis for therapeutic splenectomy. The alternative and rare situation of splenic and portal vein occlusion was demonstrated and therefore removal of the spleen was not an appropriate procedure for relief of portal hypertension. The variceal bleeding was successfully controlled with injection sclerotherapy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = haematemesis
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Hypertension, Portal'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.