Cases reported "Hypertension, Renal"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/54. Renal cell carcinoma presenting as a pseudo-carcinoid tumour.

    A 38-year-old woman presented with hypertension and a renal cell carcinoma. Raised urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid values >300 micromol/l, predictive of carcinoid tumour, were found during the perioperative period. The values returned towards normal 2 weeks post-surgery. Immunohistochemical examination of the renal cell carcinoma with neuroendocrine markers was negative. Despite a diligent search, no carcinoid tumour could be identified and the patient was well 4 years later. There was no dietary or drug explanation for this pseudocarcinoid.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/54. Traumatic arteriovenous fistula of the kidney; an unusual cause of hypertensive encephalopathy.

    A patient with a traumatic arteriovenous fistula of the kidney developed encephalopathy with seizures and was unconscious for 48 hours before undergoing a left nephrectomy, excision of a false aneurysm of the left renal artery, and colostomy closure. He has remained in good health for two years following the final operative intervention.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/54. Successful ex vivo renal artery reconstruction and renal autotransplantation.

    BACKGROUND: The increasing experience with renal allotransplantation has led to continuing development in vascular surgical techniques. These improvements have enabled complex ex vivo renal artery surgery and renal autotransplantation to be performed. The aims of the present study were to describe the results achieved with renal autotransplantation and ex vivo renal artery reconstruction (RAR) at the Newcastle Transplant Unit, John Hunter Hospital, and to review the current indications for such surgery. methods: A retrospective review was performed of patients who required renal autotransplantation with or without RAR at John Hunter Hospital, between 1991 and 1999. Data were obtained from the Newcastle Transplant Unit and the Medical Record Department of John Hunter Hospital. RESULTS: Two patients required ex vivo RAR and renal autotransplantation for severe fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) complicated by stenoses and renal artery branch aneurysms. The third patient required autotransplantation for bilateral retroperitoneal fibrosis. There was one postoperative complication of pelviureteric junction obstruction that was treated successfully with a temporary ureteric stent. All patients demonstrated normal graft function and were normotensive on follow up, which ranged from 2.5 to 5 years. CONCLUSION: The present review confirms the long-term benefits of ex vivo RAR and renal autotransplantation that have been demonstrated by previous studies. In transplant units experienced with this surgery it has been shown to be a successful and durable technique for the treatment of a variety of vascular, urologic and other diseases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/54. Congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm causing renovascular hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and death in a 19-day-old neonate.

    A full-term baby girl who was sent home day of life 2 was admitted to the hospital on day of life 7 for respiratory distress and poor feeding. The child was found to be hypertensive and in heart failure. Further workup led to the diagnosis of a suprarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, but the infant had deteriorated clinically with heart failure, modest renal failure, renovascular hypertension, and no operative cure. The child died on day of life 20. early diagnosis and prompt surgical resection are essential to managing this rare and lethal condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/54. renal artery stenosis: a complication of needle puncture for manometry. Case of subintimal dissection with spontaneous resolution.

    After aortorenal bypass for renovascular hypertension secondary to atherosclerosis of the renal artery of a solitary left kidney a high-grade stenosing lesion developed distal to the site of insertion of a Dacron graft. In the immediate postoperative period the blood pressure was restored to normal, but one week later hypertension recurred. An arteriogram disclosed an area of stenosis 1 cm distal to the site of insertion of the graft in the renal artery. During the next year, serial arteriograms were made, renal function remained normal, and hypertension gradually abated. One year after the discovery of the postbypass stenosis, an arteriogram showed disappearance of the constricting lesion. The postoperative stenosis was, in all probability, caused by subintimal dissection secondary to needle puncture for strain gauge manometry.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/54. Renal arteriovenous fistula treated by endofistulorrhaphy.

    A renal arteriovenous fistula responsible for diastolic hypertension was repaired without sacrificing renal parenchyma by endofistulorrhaphy, a unique surgical technique. The fistula site was localized preoperatively by selective renal arteriography. The renal artery was incised and the ostium of the efferent venous channel suture-ligated from within the depths of the artery. The fistula was successfully interrupted, and the patient has remained normotensive. Postoperative arteriography confirmed the absence of the fistula. vascular surgical procedures sparing renal parenchyma are relatively new, as the most common treatment for this condition had been nephrectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/54. Operative and nonoperative hypertension. Recent advances in treatment.

    In the past five years there have been significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of operative and nonoperative forms of hypertension. Several areas of specific interest to urologists will be discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/54. Hepatorenal artery bypass in the management of renovascular hypertension.

    Infrequently, when the aorta cannot be used for a standard renal bypass operation because of a previous aortic operation, severe degenerative atherosclerosis or complete aortic thrombosis, a unilateral (hepatic) or bilateral (hepatic and splenic) visceral bypass should be contemplated. patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms extending above the renal arteries might benefit from concomitant bilateral visceral bypass procedures followed by aortic replacement during the same operative session. The hepatic circulation with its common anatomic variations, indications, surgical technique and effects of hepatorenal artery bypass on the renal and hepatic circulation are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/54. renal artery stenosis and nephrotic syndrome: a rare combination in an infant.

    We describe an uncommon pediatric finding of unilateral renal artery stenosis, which presented as nephrotic syndrome, hypertension, failure to thrive, and hyponatremia. The child was a previously well 8-month-old male who looked well but had mild periorbital edema with severe hypertension. After 3 days of captopril therapy, the nephrotic-range proteinuria significantly improved. However, the hypertension persisted. Renal imaging revealed a small left kidney with reduced parenchymal uptake and no significant excretion. A renal angiogram demonstrated left renal artery stenosis with increased left renal vein renin activity. The hypertension resolved within 24 h of a left nephrectomy, but non-nephrotic-range proteinuria persisted for 8 months post operatively. pathology of the left kidney was consistent with fibromuscular dysplasia. Although a few glomeruli (1%) had changes consistent with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, such a few abnormal glomeruli were unlikely to account for the nephrotic syndrome. hypertension-induced changes in the unaffected right kidney probably caused the nephrotic-range proteinuria.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/54. High renin hypertension associated with renal cortical cyst.

    A fifty-seven-year-old patient with a five to one elevation of right renal vein plasma renin activity associated with a large, simple cortical cyst of the right lower pole is presented. Marsupialization of the cyst was associated with improvement in the patient's hypertension and the finding of bilaterally equal renal vein renin activity three months postoperatively. Possible mechanisms for hypertension are discussed in context of the experimental models of Goldblatt and Page in such lesions as cortical cysts of large size causing hydronephrosis, vascular stretching, or renal parenchymal compression.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hypertension, Renal'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.