Cases reported "Hypertrophy"

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1/93. Functional intestinal obstruction due to deficiency of argyrophil neurones in the myenteric plexus. Familial syndrome presenting with short small bowel, malrotation, and pyloric hypertrophy.

    In 3 infants functional intestinal obstruction, associated with a short small intestine, malrotation, and pyloric hypertrophy, was shown to be due to failure of development of the argyrophil myenteric plexus, with the absence of ongoing peristalsis. 4 infants with similar clinical features have been described previously, and there is evidence for an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of this syndrome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
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2/93. Moebius syndrome: the new finding of hypertrophy of the coronoid process.

    The first detailed description of congenital facial paralysis was reported by Moebius in 1888. It is characterized by either unilateral or bilateral paralysis of the facial muscles and an associated abducens palsy. The present report is of two patients with Moebius syndrome, who were also diagnosed with trismus at birth. Each patient also demonstrated bilateral hypertrophy of the coronoid process of the mandible. In effect, the zygoma obstructed the excursion of the mandible because of a "coronoid block." A three-dimensional computed tomography scan demonstrated normal temporomandibular joints but bilateral hypertrophy of the coronoid processes and micrognathia. Both patients demonstrated less than 10 mm of oral excursion. Bilateral coronoidectomies were performed through an intraoral approach. The oral excursions after surgery increased to at least 20 mm. In each of these patients, the coronoid process was enlarged relative to the zygoma, which was of normal size and configuration. The trismus was associated with blocking of the coronoid by the anterior zygoma, preventing open or full excursion of the hypoplastic mandibles. Moebius syndrome can have a variable presentation at birth. In two patients, the authors describe a new finding of hypertrophy of the coronoid process and trismus secondary to obstruction of the coronoid by the hypertrophic zygomas during oral excursions. Each patient is described, and a review of the literature is discussed.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = obstruction
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3/93. The development of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a patient with prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia.

    BACKGROUND: Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS) has been described in association with several obstructive antropyloric lesions including idiopathic foveolar hyperplasia (gastric mucosal hypertrophy), feeding tubes, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and hypertrophic antral polyps. Non obstructive antral webs have also been described with HPS. PATIENT AND methods: We present a case of gastric-outlet obstruction in association with HPS, namely, prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia. This entity has been previously described, but rarely in association with HPS. We report a female infant requiring prostaglandin therapy for pulmonary atresia who developed dose-related prostaglandin-induced foveolar hyperplasia and symptoms of progressive non-bilious vomiting. RESULTS: Initially, ultrasonography demonstrated evidence of antral mucosal hypertrophy as the cause for gastric-outlet obstruction. The patient subsequently developed progressive thickening of the antropyloric muscle, resulting in sonographic appearances of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Pyloromyotomy was eventually required for treatment of HPS. CONCLUSION: A common denominator of most of the above-described entities is thickening and/or hypertrophy of the antral mucosa. We suggest that the antropyloric musculature may hypertrophy in an effort to overcome the gastric-outlet obstruction caused by the adjacent thickened antral mucosa. In other words, these entities may represent examples of "secondary" hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.
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ranking = 0.6
keywords = obstruction
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4/93. Primary hypertrophic colonopathy.

    We report a 45-year-old man and a 60-year-old woman who presented with features of intermittent intestinal obstruction. barium enema revealed narrowing at the pelvic-rectal junction in the man, and from the pelvic colon to the anal verge in the woman. histology of the resected sections showed marked hypertrophy of the muscularis propria in both cases, with normal mucosa, submucosa and myenteric plexus. Both patients are asymptomatic at 4 years' and 2 years' follow up. This entity of primary hypertrophic colonopathy may be a variant of primary visceral myopathy.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = obstruction
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5/93. Reversible cardio-pulmonary changes due to adeno-tonsilar hypertrophy.

    Adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy, with signs of upper airway obstruction is a common presentation in ENT clinics. Recently it is identified as a major cause of sleep apnea syndrome. Several isolated case reports of pulmonary hypertension and corpulmonale appeared in the literature. The authors report two such children aged less than 2 years with cardio-pulmonary changes occurring secondary to chronic adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy that were successfully treated with the surgical removal.
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ranking = 2.4516260539113
keywords = airway obstruction, obstruction, airway
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6/93. Pneumatization of the concha inferior as a cause of nasal obstruction.

    Chronic nasal obstruction is a common disorder. hypertrophy of the inferior turbinates is responsible for nasal obstruction more frequently than it is commonly thought. A pneumatized inferior turbinate has recently been described as a cause for nasal obstruction and only two cases have been reported until now. Inferior nasal turbinate develops by endochondral ossification of components of the mesethmoid and ectethmoid. The chondral framework of the inferior turbinate consists of a double lamella and two separate ossification centers that develop between the fifth and seventh month of fetal life. The separate ossification centers meet by the eighth fetal month. During ossification, the inferior turbinate detaches from the ectethmoid and becomes an independent bony structure. During that time the epithelium may misinvaginate into double lamellas and such double lamellas formed by the inferior turbinate may become persistent. A patient was referred to our clinic with headaches and nasal obstruction. A CT scan was performed which showed that the right lower concha was pneumatized. The headache of the patient disappeared after partial resection of the lower and middle turbinate.
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ranking = 1.6
keywords = obstruction
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7/93. Hepatic vein obstruction due to hypertrophy of right split-liver adult allograft.

    The increasing shortage of liver allografts has led to the development of split liver transplantation. More frequent applications have permitted the resolution of most of its technical complications. A hitherto unreported complication of split liver transplantation, hepatic vein obstruction caused by hypertrophy of a right split-liver adult allograft, is discussed. As surgical correction was impossible, the outflow obstruction was treated successfully with interventional radiology.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = obstruction
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8/93. cystic fibrosis and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis: is there an association?

    cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal genetic disease among Caucasian populations. The generally accepted incidence of CF in the united states is 1 in 3,200 in the Caucasian population. Intestinal obstructions and atresias have been described among patients with CF. An association of CF with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) has not been previously documented. A review in our clinic of 72 patients with CF revealed IHPS in two. The incidence of 2.7% is greater than the 0.3% incidence expected in the general population. This ninefold increase in IHPS in patients with CF suggests an association between the two and warrants further investigation.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = obstruction
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9/93. infectious mononucleosis presenting as upper airway obstruction.

    Upper airway obstruction though a common complication of infectious mononucleosis is rarely considered in differential diagnosis of stridor. We report a three-year-old child who had upper airway obstruction due to infectious mononucleosis, managed conservatively with oxygen, intravenous fluids and steroids.
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ranking = 14.709756323468
keywords = airway obstruction, obstruction, airway
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10/93. Marble impaction in the nasopharynx following oral ingestion.

    Foreign body ingestion is an important emergency occurring in childhood. In this article, we report the case of a 5-year-old girl with marble impaction in the nasopharynx, which had not been discovered by routine x-rays of the chest and abdomen at the time of ingestion. The patient presented 4 months after the event with typical symptoms of adenoid hypertrophy and sinusitis, and the diagnosis was established on the basis of a plain film of the nasopharynx. This rare situation is potentially dangerous, since the foreign body may descend and cause sudden airway obstruction. Therefore, in all cases with vanishing foreign bodies in the aerodigestive system, nasopharyngeal impaction and its fatal consequences should be kept in mind and endoscopic examination of the region should be considered.
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ranking = 2.4516260539113
keywords = airway obstruction, obstruction, airway
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