Cases reported "Hypertrophy"

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1/13. Novel gastrointestinal tract manifestations in juvenile dermatomyositis.

    We report a case of juvenile dermatomyositis in which a dilated atonic esophagus was associated with delayed gastric emptying and intestinal mucosal thickening, resulting in a radiographic "stacked coin" appearance. These findings, which can also occur in infectious, neoplastic, or other immune-mediated diseases, broaden the spectrum of gastrointestinal tract manifestations in juvenile dermatomyositis. physicians should be alert for these treatable manifestations in children with myositis who present with unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms, which are reversible with immunosuppressive therapy.
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keywords = esophagus
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2/13. An uncommon association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    Although infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following esophageal atresia repair is known, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis following H-type tracheoesophageal fistula has not been encountered previously. A case of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula and infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is presented. The patient, operated on for H-type fistula, a rare congenital anomaly of the esophagus, on the tenth day of life was readmitted 19 days later because of continuous vomiting after every feeding. The clinical findings and physical and radiological examinations revealed infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis which required surgical treatment. It is suggested that the association of H-type tracheoesophageal fistula with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is coincidental, given the estimated incidence of one in every 84,375,000 males and 337,500,000 females.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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3/13. Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis: another cause of pseudoachalasia.

    The patient was a 22-year-old woman who had presented in early childhood with gastroesophageal reflux and who subsequently underwent surgery. It was commented upon by the surgeons at that time that the esophagus was abnormally thickened. The patient subsequently presented during her first pregnancy with a vulval tumor, which proved histologically to be a leiomyoma. She was also found to have a grossly dilated esophagus and was thought to have achalasia. However, endoscopic ultrasound imaging showed gross hypertrophy of the mid- and distal esophageal wall, with only mild symptoms of dysphagia, which had been long-standing. The appearance of the esophagus was consistent with diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis. In view of the associated vulval leiomyoma, the patient demonstrated esophagovulvar syndrome.
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ranking = 3
keywords = esophagus
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4/13. A case of superficial esophageal cancer complicated with idiopathic muscular hypertrophy of the esophagus.

    We hereby reported a case of 60-year old man with superficial esophageal cancer complicated with idiopathic muscular hypertrophy of the esophagus. Endoscopic ultrasonography and CT showed the thickness of esophageal muscular layer, but the accurate diagnosis could not be entertained before operation. Idiopathic muscular hypertrophy of the esophagus is an entity rarely encountered, and most cases are diagnosed at postmortem examination. Only a few cases have been reported regarding its clinical symptoms and images. The etiology remains to be elucidated, and the pathologic features are characterized by significant thickness of inner circular muscular layer of esophagus without degeneration of plexus and ganglionic cells. This case report deals with superficial esophageal cancer complicated with idiopathic muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. literature review is also included.
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ranking = 8
keywords = esophagus
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5/13. Congenital segmental fibromuscular hypertrophy of the esophagus and esophageal atresia: an uncommon case.

    Although a rare entity, congenital esophageal stenosis due to segmental hypertrophy of the muscularis and submucosal layers with diffuse fibrosis should be considered a possibility in patients with esophageal stricture associated to congenital esophageal atresia. The efficacy of dilatation seems to be limited, and may even result in severe complications such as an esophageal rupture. Surgical repair for congenital esophageal stenosis is the authors' preferred treatment, although initial dilatation may be effective for some patients.
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ranking = 4
keywords = esophagus
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6/13. Muscular hypertrophy of the oesophagus and "Alport-like" glomerular lesions in a boy.

    A patient with idiopathic muscular hypertrophy of the oesophagus, bilateral cataracts and an Alport-like nephropathy is described. Only 15 patients with a similar association have been described so far and autosomal dominant inheritance is most likely.
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ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
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7/13. Respiratory muscle weakness and ventilatory failure in AL amyloidosis with muscular pseudohypertrophy.

    Generalized muscle weakness culminating in ventilatory failure developed in a 59-year-old man with kappa light chain multiple myeloma. physical examination demonstrated skeletal muscle enlargement, severe proximal muscle weakness, and macroglossia, consistent with amyloid-associated muscle pseudohypertrophy. Pulmonary function studies revealed a severe restrictive abnormality with a low maximal inspiratory pressure and maximal voluntary ventilation. Arterial blood gas values and chest radiographic results were normal. There was no clinical evidence of cardiac or central nervous system disease. At autopsy, skeletal muscles and diaphragm were diffusely infiltrated by amyloid. There was also multifocal deposition of amyloid in alveolar septae, esophagus, and subendocardium. This report suggests that ventilatory failure may occur as a complication of myeloma-associated (AL) amyloidosis involving the respiratory muscles.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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8/13. Membranous atresia of esophagus associated with pyloric stenosis.

    Membranous atresia of the esophagus without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is very rare, only four cases have been reported since 1928. We present a case in whom a thick membrane was present 2 cm proximal to the diaphragm. The membrane was resected and the longitudinal esophagotomy wound was closed transversely. The postoperative course was complicated with hyperbilirubinemia and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS). The problems of the feeding tube used for diagnostic evaluation of this rare esophageal anomaly are discussed. In spite of its low incidence, the potentiality of HPS as a cause of postoperative vomiting in esophageal atresia should be borne in mind in order to avoid delay in diagnosis.
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ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
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9/13. Development of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in patients treated for oesophageal atresia. A case report.

    Two cases of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) developed in 74 patients treated for oesophageal atresia. Treatment of oesophageal atresia is frequently followed by vomiting and failure to thrive due to gastrooesophageal reflux or anastomotic stricture. The diagnose of IHPS must be considered in such patients under the age of 8 weeks as symptoms of IHPS are similar to those of gastrooesophageal reflux. The diagnose of IHPS is strongly supported by the presence of a non-carbonic alkalosis. Contrast studies including oesophagus, stomach and duodenum are to be made early in the course, as clinical signs of IHPS are often masked.
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ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
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10/13. Idiopathic muscular hypertrophy of the esophagus. Postmortem incidental finding in six cases and review of the literature.

    Six cases of idiopathic muscular hypertrophy of the esophagus were found at autopsy in a relatively short period of time. As has been the experience in previously reported cases, our finding was incidental at the autopsy in all of the cases. In only one of our patients were there relevant symptoms and radiographic changes that could be attributed to the disease. How often patients with muscular hypertrophy of the esophagus have the clinical syndrome of diffuse esophageal spasm remains unclear. It is therefore evident that only by awareness of this entity can studies of esophageal funtion, x-ray films, and appropriate treatment prevent serious morbidity and occasional mortality from the disease.
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ranking = 6
keywords = esophagus
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