Cases reported "Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/18. Primary placement of a voice prosthesis on transposed colon after total pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy.

    BACKGROUND: Primary placement of a voice prosthesis may aid rehabilitation after total laryngectomy. methods: We present a rare clinical situation of a T4 NO MO squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx and esophagus in a patient who had previously undergone a transmesocolic Billroth II gastrectomy. RESULTS: The patient benefited from a total pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy, with reconstruction using a transverse-descending colon transposition, and primary placement of a low-pressure voice prosthesis. CONCLUSION: Primary placement of a voice prosthesis may be successful even in a patient who requires extensive pharyngoesophageal reconstruction using transposed colon. To our knowledge, there has been no previous report of primary placement of a voice prosthesis on a colon autograft.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/18. Free colon transfer for pharyngo-oesophageal reconstruction.

    This report describes free transfer of transverse colon for reconstruction of the hypopharynx and cervical oesophagus. The transverse colon based on the middle colic vessels was used in three patients following laryngo-pharyngo-oesophagectomy for hypopharyngeal squamous carcinoma. There were no flap failures or intra-abdominal complications. Solid diet was well tolerated. Transverse colon is easy to harvest, has a long vascular pedicle, wide diameter and good ischaemic tolerance. Contrast studies showed it to be a wide bore passive conduit. Compared with currently available options these features may allow better outcome in pharyngo-oesophageal reconstruction and warrant further evaluation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/18. Esophageal reconstruction using a stomach roll following endoscopic mucosal resection.

    A 73-year-old male patient presenting with synchronous triple cancer of the hypopharynx, esophagus and stomach is herein reported. To pursue safety by reducing surgical stress and better postoperative quality of life, we preserved the stomach by treating the gastric cancer by endoscopic mucosal resection and subsequently used the stomach for making an elongated stomach roll during the esophageal reconstruction. Postoperatively, no complications occurred and the patient has been on oral feeding for 23 months with no recurrence of primary cancer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/18. Does laryngectomy improve swallowing after chemoradiotherapy? A case study.

    organ preservation protocols of high-dose chemoradiotherapy have become fairly common to treat head and neck cancers. However, significant swallowing problems can occur. This study examines swallowing, oral tongue pressures, and tongue base-to-pharyngeal wall pressures in a patient who underwent total laryngectomy for improvement of swallowing after chemoradiotherapy for treatment of a hypopharyngeal tumor. The patient underwent concurrent videofluorographic and manometric examination of swallowing and examination of oral tongue pressures after the laryngectomy. One healthy subject was used as a control. After the laryngectomy, the patient no longer aspirated; however, he could swallow only liquids and pureed foods. He demonstrated difficulty with bolus clearance through the oral cavity and pharyngocervical esophagus. Pharyngeal pressures were reduced compared with those of the control subject. While total laryngectomy will stop unremitting aspiration, swallowing after chemoradiation may be severely compromised. This may not be overcome by total laryngectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/18. Endoscopic stapling technique for redundant free jejunal interposition graft.

    Dysphagia may occur after reconstruction of the cervical esophagus by jejunal interposition. It may be caused by redundancy and subsequent development of a diverticulum. The present report relates to the case of a patient who developed complete aphagia 2 months after surgery and was treated transorally by division of a common wall between diverticulum and descending jejunal limb with the use of an endoscopic stapling device. The patient started swallowing the first postoperative day and remained able to take oral food at follow-up.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/18. Lateral upper arm free flap for primary reconstruction of pharyngeal defects in ablative oncological surgery. Report of six consecutive cases.

    Free microvascular flaps are an established method for soft tissue reconstruction following ablative oncological surgery in the head and neck. Functional reconstructions of the hypopharynx and the pharyngoesophageal segment (PES) are of particular relevance, as they are highly demanding surgical procedures. So far, the radial forearm free flap (RFFF) and the free jejunal transfer have been the transplants predominantly used for this purpose. The lateral upper arm free flap (LUFF) presents an alternative method for the fasciocutaneous tissue transfer. We report on our experience with the LUFF in a 56-year-old male patient with a pT3pN0M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx. A pharyngocutaneous fistula developed 5 days after pharyngolaryngectomy with bilateral neck dissection. The fistula was localized between the pharyngeal constrictor muscle and the esophagus and was closed with an LUFF from the left arm. Excellent flap adaptation to the remaining pharyngeal mucosa was observed. Although the length of the vascular pedicle and the diameter of the vessels in the LUFF are smaller than those in the RFFF, neither pedicle length nor vessel diameter proved to be a problem. The LUFF can be recommended as a well-vascularized, relatively safe and reliable flap for reconstruction of tubular structures such as the hypopharynx and the PES after tumor ablation and as an alternative to the RFFF. The flexibility of the LUFF allows surgeons to reconstruct the anatomy of the lost soft tissues as adequately as possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/18. Panendoscopy and synchronous second primary tumors in head and neck cancer patients.

    endoscopy techniques are used to diagnose and to determine the extent and exact location of malignancies in the head and neck region, bronchial tree and esophagus. Panendoscopy is used to find the primary tumor in the case of metastatic disease from unknown primaries or to detect a simultaneous second primary tumor at the time of diagnosis of a malignancy in the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT). The value of panendoscopy has been debated lately because of the relatively small proportion of malignant findings and because of the lack of convincing data concerning its effect on survival rates. However, despite the relatively low proportion of positive findings, their significance is often crucial for the individual patient. The significant number of late metachronous, second primaries, especially in the lungs, also emphasizes the importance of follow-up endoscopies. This study consists of 203 consecutive patients with squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the upper aerodigestive tract who underwent panendoscopy in Turku University Central Hospital as part of the initial diagnostic workup from 1992-1999. Eight patients with synchronous second primaries were found to represent a prevalence of 3.9%, and in addition, 19 patients with metachronous tumors were diagnosed. In the case reports we illustrate the importance of some of these findings.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/18. Four cases of simultaneous triple primary cancers of the hypopharynx, esophagus, and stomach.

    OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy of intensive chemotherapy for simultaneous triple primary cancers of the hypopharynx, esophagus, and stomach. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case study. methods: From April 2000 to March 2002, we treated 4 patients who had simultaneous triple primary cancers, including hypopharyngeal, esophageal, and gastric carcinomas. These 4 patients were designated as the objects for analysis, and the treatment modality for simultaneous multiple primary cancer cases was examined. RESULTS: In 3 of 4 patients, all 3 primary cancers could be controlled by intensive induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer and by endoscopic mucosal resection or argon plasma coagulation for esophageal and gastric carcinomas. CONCLUSIONS: In the treatment modality for simultaneous multiple primary cancers, including head and neck cancer, it is important to select intensive systemic chemotherapy and decide the order for treating each primary lesion in consideration of each patient's curability and prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/18. Treatment of a radiation-induced esophageal web with retrograde esophagoscopy and puncture.

    OBJECTIVE: To present a technique for the treatment of complete esophageal stenosis in the post-radiation patient that may be applied to selected patients with obstructing stenoses. STUDY DESIGN: A case report of the treatment of a post-radiation esophageal web. methods: A review of the patient's history of treatment and a discussion of reported treatment options. RESULTS: A complete obstruction of the cervical esophagus was diagnosed in a patient after chemoradiation for a hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Retrograde esophagoscopy through the patient's percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube site aided visualization and perforation of the obstructing tissue. Subsequent dilation has allowed the patient to resume oral intake of a regular diet without restrictions. CONCLUSION: Combined direct laryngoscopy with retrograde esophagoscopy represents a viable alternative to more extensive approaches for recannulization of selected obstructing esophageal stenoses.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/18. Reconstruction of long cervical esophageal defects with the radial forearm flap.

    The radial forearm flap has been used for reconstruction of the cervical esophagus most often as a patch or for circumferential repair of short defects (less than 5 cm). In the following three cases, the radial forearm flap was used to reconstruct circumferential cervical esophageal defects ranging from 5 to 12 mm in length. These procedures were successfully carried out in three patients in whom the intraoperative defect was unexpectedly large or the intra-abdominal viscera harvest would have been difficult. These patients had reliable esophageal function 8 to 24 months after surgery. We conclude that the radial forearm flap can be used for reconstruction of large circumferential defects of the cervical esophagus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = esophagus
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.