Cases reported "Hypopharyngeal Neoplasms"

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1/54. Sternothoracotomy for combined coronary artery bypass grafting and left upper lobectomy in a patient with low-lying tracheostoma.

    A 64-year-old man had a low-lying tracheostoma and presented with unstable angina and a mass in the pulmonary left upper lobe. Simultaneous coronary revascularization and resection of the lung neoplasm were completed through a sternothoracotomy (clam-shell) incision. The advantages of this approach include excellent exposure to the mediastinum and the lung fields, and the option of using both internal thoracic arteries for bypass grafting.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neoplasm
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2/54. Extraosseous metastases of hepatocellular carcinoma detection and therapeutic assessment with Tc-99m PMT SPECT.

    Owing to recent advances in imaging technology and radiologic intervention, survival rates in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma have improved markedly. However, such prolonged survival has resulted in an increase in extrahepatic metastases. Tc-99m (Sn)-N-pyridoxyl-5-methyltryptophan (Tc-99m PMT), developed for hepatobiliary scintigraphy, has been used to visualize extrahepatic metastases, with most related reports limited to osseous metastases. The authors report two cases of hepatocellular cancer presenting as a hypopharyngeal metastasis and intraperitoneal dissemination along the tract of a fine-needle biopsy. Lesions undetectable on planar imaging could be visualized by Tc-99m PMT SPECT.
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ranking = 4.2425430986745
keywords = cancer
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3/54. Clinical delivery of intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy for relapsed or second-primary head and neck cancer using a multileaf collimator with dynamic control.

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Concave dose distributions generated by intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were applied to re-irradiate three patients with pharyngeal cancer. patients, MATERIALS AND methods: Conventional radiotherapy for oropharyngeal (patients 1 and 3) or nasopharyngeal (patient 2) cancers was followed by relapsing or new tumors in the nasopharynx (patients 1 and 2) and hypopharynx (patient 3). Six non-opposed coplanar intensity modulated beams were generated by combining non-modulated beamparts with intensities (weights) obtained by minimizing a biophysical objective function. Beamparts were delivered by a dynamic MLC (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) forced in step and shoot mode. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Median PTV-doses (and ranges) for the three patients were 73 (65-78), 67 (59-72) and 63 (48-68) Gy. Maximum point doses to brain stem and spinal cord were, respectively, 67 Gy (60% of volume below 30 Gy) and 32 Gy (97% below 10 Gy) for patient 1; 60 Gy (69% below 30 Gy) and 34 Gy (92% below 10 Gy) for patient 2 and 21 Gy (96% below 10 Gy) at spinal cord for patient 3. Maximum point doses to the mandible were 69 Gy for patient 1 and 64 Gy for patient 2 with, respectively, 66 and 92% of the volume below 20 Gy. A treatment session, using the dynamic MLC, was finished within a 15-min time slot.
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ranking = 25.455258592047
keywords = cancer
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4/54. Choroidal metastasis from carcinoma of the hypopharynx: a case report.

    Choroidal metastasis from primaries other than breast or lung cancer is a rare event. There is no documented case in the literature of choroidal metastases in patients with hypopharynx carcinoma. Early treatment with radiation therapy provides effective palliation by preserving visual function and preventing the need for enucleation. Chemotherapy alone does not seem to be as effective as radiation therapy for patients with choroidal metastases. In this paper a case of choroidal metastasis arising from a primary hypopharynx carcinoma is presented.
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ranking = 4.2425430986745
keywords = cancer
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5/54. cytomegalovirus colitis after administration of docetaxel-5-fluorouracil-cisplatin chemotherapy for locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer.

    We present the case of a patient with a locally advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma who developed a severe cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis after his first chemotherapy course with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), docetaxel and cisplatin. The most probable cause of his CMV colitis is the impaired immunity during a phase of neutropenia after the chemotherapy. Although there was amelioration of the colitis and clinical status after treatment with ganciclovir, the patient later deteriorated and died due to recurrent bacterial infections. This is the third reported case of CMV colitis treated with ganciclovir in a patient with a solid tumour. It is the first report of CMV colitis after docetaxel containing chemotherapy. Although CMV colitis is most frequently observed in immunosuppressed patients such as those with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), transplants and corticosteroid treatment, it has also been reported in less immunosuppressed (elderly, malnourished,...) and even non-immunosuppressed patients. CMV infection should therefore be included in the differential diagnosis of GI disease in all patients, and when suspected, the clinician should pursue appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.
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ranking = 16.970172394698
keywords = cancer
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6/54. Surgical treatment of recalcitrant radiation-induced gastric erosions.

    BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled bleeding as a result of radiation gastritis in patients who have pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy and gastric pull-up is seldom reported. Surgical resection in the management of this condition has rarely been described. METHOD: A 66-year-old man with hypopharyngeal cancer was treated by pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy and gastric transposition. He received postoperative radiotherapy and had recurrent hemorrhagic gastritis, necessitating surgical resection. The manubrium was resected to access the mediastinal part of the gastric conduit. The diseased part of the gastric conduit was removed and a free jejunal graft was interposed to replace the resected stomach. RESULTS: Manubrial resection offered adequate access to the stomach transposed in the mediastinum, and the life-threatening bleeding gastritis was successfully controlled by surgical resection. CONCLUSION: Surgical resection of the radiation-damaged transposed stomach through a manubrial resection approach can safely be performed. Free jejunal graft is the choice of reconstruction of the circumferential defect.
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ranking = 153.39912665638
keywords = radiation-induced, cancer
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7/54. Rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and carcinoma of the hypopharynx.

    We report on a 50-year-old man with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and carcinoma of the hypopharynx. Because cancer treatment was followed by remission of proteinuria and complete restoration of renal function, a causal relationship between tumor and glomerular injury seems possible.
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ranking = 4.2425430986745
keywords = cancer
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8/54. Esophageal reconstruction using a stomach roll following endoscopic mucosal resection.

    A 73-year-old male patient presenting with synchronous triple cancer of the hypopharynx, esophagus and stomach is herein reported. To pursue safety by reducing surgical stress and better postoperative quality of life, we preserved the stomach by treating the gastric cancer by endoscopic mucosal resection and subsequently used the stomach for making an elongated stomach roll during the esophageal reconstruction. Postoperatively, no complications occurred and the patient has been on oral feeding for 23 months with no recurrence of primary cancer.
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ranking = 12.727629296023
keywords = cancer
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9/54. Does laryngectomy improve swallowing after chemoradiotherapy? A case study.

    organ preservation protocols of high-dose chemoradiotherapy have become fairly common to treat head and neck cancers. However, significant swallowing problems can occur. This study examines swallowing, oral tongue pressures, and tongue base-to-pharyngeal wall pressures in a patient who underwent total laryngectomy for improvement of swallowing after chemoradiotherapy for treatment of a hypopharyngeal tumor. The patient underwent concurrent videofluorographic and manometric examination of swallowing and examination of oral tongue pressures after the laryngectomy. One healthy subject was used as a control. After the laryngectomy, the patient no longer aspirated; however, he could swallow only liquids and pureed foods. He demonstrated difficulty with bolus clearance through the oral cavity and pharyngocervical esophagus. Pharyngeal pressures were reduced compared with those of the control subject. While total laryngectomy will stop unremitting aspiration, swallowing after chemoradiation may be severely compromised. This may not be overcome by total laryngectomy.
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ranking = 4.2425430986745
keywords = cancer
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10/54. Renal metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx.

    We present a rare case of metastatic renal tumor originating from squamous cell carcinoma of the hypopharynx. A 67-year-old man treated with irradiation for hypopharyngeal carcinoma was referred to our hospital with gross hematuria and a left renal mass, which was delineated as a heterogeneously enhanced mass by CT scan. Left nephrectomy was performed, and the non-encapsulated mass was gray in color macroscopically. Histological examination of the specimen revealed alveolar proliferation of small cancer cells, which was consistent with the original tumor of the hypopharynx. The left renal tumor was diagnosed as poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma metastasized from the hypopharynx. The patient remains alive, with no evidence of disease, 8 months following left nephrectomy. This case was thought to be the first report of a renal metastasis from a hypopharyngeal carcinoma that was diagnosed clinically and treated with nephrectomy.
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ranking = 4.2425430986745
keywords = cancer
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