Cases reported "Hypothermia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/24. Gabapentin's effects on hot flashes and hypothermia.

    The author describes six cases in which gabapentin treatment reduced the frequency of hot flashes. In addition, gabapentin treatment enhanced the frequency of hypothermic episodes in a separate patient with known hypothalamic dysfunction. Gabapentin may act directly upon temperature regulatory centers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/24. Electrocardiographic issues related to action potential phases 1 and 2 on the occasion of a case of accidental mild hypothermia.

    A 29-year-old man was accidentally exposed to cold and his mild hypothermia uniquely resulted in the transient exaggeration of his normothermic electrocardiographic findings, which were consistent with early repolarization. A unifying concept of clinical entities with similar J wave and ST segment elevation (J-ST syndrome) is proposed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 173.46568650719
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/24. Dysfunction of phrenic pacemakers induced by metallic rescue blankets.

    Phrenic pacing can restore diaphragmatic contractions in patients with central respiratory paralysis. It relies on radiofrequency transmission of energy from an external unit to implanted receivers through circular coil antennas. The case of a patient is reported in whom severe hypoventilation occurred following the use of a metallic rescue blanket. The phenomenon was confirmed in two subsequent patients and during benchmark tests. Possible mechanisms include reflection and diffusion of high frequency waves by a Faraday-like effect. patients with implanted devices relying on telemetric control or powering, and their care givers, should be warned against the use of metallic rescue sheets.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 174.46568650719
keywords = wave, frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/24. Circulatory arrest to protect transplant kidney in a patient with chronic type III dissection.

    With broader indications for renal transplantation and improved allograft survival, it is anticipated that the problem of aortic disease in the post-transplant patient will be encountered with increasing frequency. We report a technique of protecting the transplant kidney from ischemic damage during distal aortic surgery. A 30-year-old renal transplant patient who had undergone an operation for ruptured chronic type III dissection 3 years previously underwent abdominal aortic aneurysm repair under hypothermic circulatory arrest. The patient recovered uneventfully and is presently doing well 1 year after the operation. Hypothermic circulatory arrest could be used in selected cases as a useful alternative for transplant kidney protection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/24. Electrocardiographic manifestations of hypothermia.

    hypothermia is generally defined as a core body temperature less than 35 degrees C (95 degrees F). hypothermia is one of the most common environmental emergencies encountered by emergency physicians. Although the diagnosis will usually be evident after an initial check of vital signs, the diagnosis can sometimes be missed because of overreliance on normal or near-normal oral or tympanic thermometer readings. The classic and well-known electrocardiographic (ECG) manifestations of hypothermia include the presence of J (Osborn) waves, interval (PR, QRS, QT) prolongation, and atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias. There are also some less known (ECG) findings associated with hypothermia. For example, hypothermia can produce ECG signs that simulate those of acute myocardial ischemia or myocardial infarction. hypothermia can also blunt the expected ECG findings associated with hyperkalemia. A thorough knowledge of these findings is important for prompt diagnosis and treatment of hypothermia. Six cases are presented that show these important ECG manifestations of hypothermia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 173.46568650719
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/24. Giant J wave on 12-lead electrocardiogram in hypothermia.

    Findings on standard 12-lead electrocardiogram in patients with hypothermia include sinus bradycardia, prolonged QT and PR interval, wide QRS complex, supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmia, and the most striking electrocardiographic abnormality, the J wave. Although characteristic of hypothermia, J wave also occurs in other conditions. The electro-physiologic basis of J wave in hypothermia has been recently elucidated. We present a case of giant J wave due to accidental hypothermia and in addition discuss the features, mechanism, and significance of J wave in hypothermia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1561.1911785647
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/24. Osborn waves in the electrocardiogram, hypothermia not due to exposure, and death due to diabetic ketoacidosis.

    hypothermia usually occurs because a patient has been exposed to a cold environment; however, a number of nonenvironmental conditions may produce hypothermia. This report relates the clinical course of a patient whose hypothermia was due to severe diabetic ketoacidosis. In addition, we review the causes of hypothermia and Osborn waves beyond exposure to cold temperature. hypothermia due to diabetic ketoacidosis is an uncommon complication of a common disease that carries with it clinically significant consequences. Accordingly, we believe that all clinicians should be aware of this potential complication of diabetic ketoacidosis and should be able to recognize the importance of the electrocardiogram in such patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 867.32843253595
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/24. atrial fibrillation and prominent J (Osborn) waves in critical hypothermia.

    The J wave is a deflection that appears on the surface ECG as a late delta wave following the QRS complex. Also known as an Osborn wave, the J wave has been observed in various conditions and diseases. Our case highlights the typical electrocardiographic manifestations of hypothermia including the J deflection and ST segment elevation during atrial fibrillation. Thorough knowledge of these findings is important for prompt diagnosis and treatment of hypothermic states.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1387.7254920575
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/24. Spectrum of injuries from glacial sports.

    OBJECTIVE: Glacial sports continue to be a popular form of wilderness activity, but no published studies have commented on this type of sport or focused on the injury patterns of glacial accidents. The objectives of this study were to investigate the types and frequency of injuries associated with a glacial-crevasse or ice-field fall. methods: The trauma registry data and radiology record system of a pediatric and adult level 1 trauma center were evaluated from January 1997 through August 2003. All admissions with injuries caused by a glacial-crevasse or ice-field fall were reviewed. RESULTS: During the 5 1/2-year period we identified 12 patients, of whom 9 (75%) were male. The average age was 30.2 years with an age range of 9 to 57 years. Six patients fell into glacial crevasses, and the other 6 slid down an ice field of a glacier. Leading diagnoses were head injury (44.6%), thorax injury (20.1%), and lower extremity injury (18.4%). Serious injuries were observed in 66.6% of the patients with a glasgow coma scale of 3 to 8. CONCLUSIONS: A wide spectrum of injuries is associated with glacial accidents. They range from common extremity injuries with fracture or joint instability and peripheral frostbite to potentially life-threatening nonorthopedic trauma, which requires intensive clinical and radiological work-up. Injury prevention strategies should focus on wearing helmets to reduce head injuries and adequate clothing to forestall or prevent hypothermia, for these are the most severe and life-threatening injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = frequency
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/24. J wave and hypothermia.

    hypothermia can result from exposure to a cold environment (e.g., accidental drowning) or it can be induced and used as a brain protection strategy (e.g., therapeutic hypothermia). One common ECG presentation with hypothermia is the J wave, which is related to the altered cellular activities during hypothermia. A case study is used in this article to illustrate the presentation of a J wave with a patient experiencing hypothermia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1040.7941190431
keywords = wave
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Hypothermia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.