Cases reported "Hypothermia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. hypothermia-related deaths--alaska, October 1998-April 1999, and trends in the united states, 1979-1996.

    hypothermia is defined as an unintentional lowering of the core body temperature to < or = 95 F (< or = 35 C) (1). It is a medical emergency with a high fatality rate (2). In the united states, hypothermia-related deaths can occur anywhere, including in states with milder climates (e.g., georgia and north carolina) where weather systems can cause rapid changes in temperature. However, the highest hypothermia-related death rates in the united states occur in northern states, where winter is characterized by moderate to severe cold temperatures (e.g., alaska and montana), and western states, where profound declines in nighttime temperatures may occur at high elevations (e.g., new mexico). From October 1998 through April 1999, 16 deaths attributed to hypothermia (international classification of diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9], codes E901.0, E901.8, and E901.9; excludes man-made cold [E901.1]) were reported to the alaska State Medical Examiner. This report describes selected cases of hypothermia-related deaths in alaska during October 1998-April 1999; compares age-, sex-, and race-specific rates in alaska and the rest of the united states during 1979-1996; and summarizes trends for hypothermia-related deaths in the united states during 1979-1996.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = weather
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. hypothermia-related deaths--philadelphia, 2001, and united states, 1999.

    hypothermia is defined as the unintentional lowering of the deep body (core) temperature below 95.0 degrees F (35.0 degrees C). hypothermia can be mild (90.0 degrees F-<95.0 degrees F [32.2 degrees C-<35.0 degrees C]), moderate (82.5 degrees F-<90.0 degrees F [28.0 degrees C-<32.2 degrees C]), or severe (<82.5 degrees F [<28.0 degrees C]). Common risk factors for hypothermia include exposure to cold while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, altered mental status, and immersion in cold water. During 1979-1998, approximately 700 persons (range: 420-1,024) died annually in the united states from hypothermia; approximately half of these deaths were attributed to extremely cold weather. This report presents three cases of hypothermia-related deaths in philadelphia during 2001 as examples of risk factors for hypothermia and summarizes information about hypothermia-related deaths in the united states during 1999. hypothermia deaths are preventable; by avoiding hypothermia, persons also can prevent other adverse health effects of cold weather.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = weather
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. A case report of warm weather accidental hypothermia.

    A case of hypothermia is presented as a reminder to "Deep South" physicians that our warm weather is not prophylaxis against this syndrome; and many common situations, diseases and medications contribute to and worsen the condition. diagnosis is made by obtaining a true core body temperature and effective treatment modalities can be easily applied. With appropriate rewarming, a search for complications and monitoring of patient progress a gratifying outcome should result for both patient and physician.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = weather
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. An unusual case of accidental hypothermia due to cold water immersion.

    Accidental deaths due to hypothermia most commonly result from exposure to low environmental temperature. Generally, a cold climatic condition is present in a severe environmental setting. A case report is presented of a 58-year-old man who died from accidental hypothermia associated with immersion in cold water while on a farm during warm weather. The importance of an adequate death scene investigation is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = weather
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. hypothermia-related deaths--new mexico, October 1993-March 1994.

    hypothermia is an unintentional lowering of the body temperature to < or = 95 F (< or = 35 C) (1). From 1979 through 1992, 10,550 persons in the united states died from hypothermia, an average of 754 deaths per year (range: 557-1021). Most of these deaths occurred during winter months in three distinct climatic areas: northern states characterized by moderate to severe cold temperatures during winter (e.g., illinois and new york); southern states where rapid changes in temperature occur because of the effects of weather systems (e.g., north carolina, south carolina, and virginia); and western states in areas of high elevations and profound declines in temperatures at night (e.g., new mexico and arizona). From October 1993 through March 1994, a total of 23 deaths attributed to hypothermia were reported to the new mexico Office of the Medical Investigator. This report summarizes the investigations of four of these deaths and the epidemiology for all 23 cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = weather
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. Accidental hypothermia: peritoneal dialysis.

    Accidental hypothermia may develop within a few minutes by immersion in cold water, in a matter of hours by exposure to cold weather, and in a matter of days in debilitatted victims by continuous exposure to milder cold stress. The prognosis in accidental hypothermia depends on the patient's premorbid condition, the depth and duration of the hypothermia and the degree of exhaustion and metabolic acidosis that result from physiologic attempts to compensate for the heat loss. For deep hypothermia (deep body temperature below 20 C [82.4F]), internal rewarming is strongly recommended as a means of supporting function in body core organs and minimizing the risk of "rewarming shock". For lesser degrees of hypothermia, recoverability depends more on the adequacy of supportive care than on the method of rewarming. The rapid and complete recovery experienced in the case presented is not surprising since the patient's premorbid condition was good, chilling had been rapid, metabolic exhaustion was mild, and internal rewarming was accomplished without delay, using heated peritoneal dialysis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = weather
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. hypothermia-related deaths--georgia, January 1996-December 1997, and united states, 1979-1995.

    Although hypothermia-related deaths are prevalent during the winter in states that have moderately cold (e.g., illinois, new york, and pennsylvania) to severely cold (e.g., alaska and north dakota) winters and in states with mountainous or desert terrain (e.g., arizona, montana, and new mexico), hypothermia-related deaths also occur in states with milder climates (e.g., georgia, mississippi, and south carolina), where weather systems can cause rapid changes in temperature. This report summarizes three hypothermia-related deaths in Fulton County, georgia, representing persons in the highest risk groups for hypothermia; and summarizes hypothermia-related deaths in georgia during January 1996-December 1997 and in the united states during 1979-1995.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = weather
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Hypothermia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.