Cases reported "Iatrogenic Disease"

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1/74. Hyperactive rhizopathy of the vagus nerve and microvascular decompression. Case report.

    A 37-year-old woman underwent microvascular decompression of the superior vestibular nerve for disabling positional vertigo. Immediately following the operation, she noted severe and spontaneous gagging and dysphagia. Multiple magnetic resonance images were obtained but failed to demonstrate a brainstem lesion and attempts at medical management failed. Two years later she underwent exploration of the posterior fossa. At the second operation, the vertebral artery as well as the posterior inferior cerebellar artery were noted to be compressing the vagus nerve. The vessels were mobilized and held away from the nerve with Teflon felt. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately after the second operation and she has remained symptom free. The authors hypothesize that at least one artery was shifted at the time of her first operation, or immediately thereafter, which resulted in vascular compression of the vagus nerve. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hyperactive gagging response treated with microvascular decompression. The case also illustrates the occurrence of a possibly iatrogenic neurovascular compression syndrome.
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keywords = nerve
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2/74. median nerve damage from brachial artery puncture: a case report.

    This report describes a case in which puncture of the brachial artery to obtain a sample for blood-gas analysis resulted in damage to the median nerve with a persisting neuropathy and apparent loss of function. Errors in judgment and contributions to possible negligence included (1) inappropriate choice of sampling site; (2) lack of knowledge of precautions and possible complications; (3) incomplete/inadequate description of optimal procedure in departmental procedure manual; (4) arbitrary selection of the dominant hand.
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ranking = 0.625
keywords = nerve
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3/74. Complete avulsion of the distal posterior interosseous nerve during wrist arthroscopy: a possible cause of persistent pain after arthroscopy.

    A case of avulsion of the distal posterior interosseous nerve during wrist arthroscopy is presented. Surgeons unaware of this entity may attribute persistent middorsal wrist pain to the underlying disease rather than to iatrogenic damage to the distal posterior interosseous nerve.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = nerve
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4/74. Complete transection of the median and radial nerves during arthroscopic release of post-traumatic elbow contracture.

    Arthroscopic debridement and capsular release was performed in a 57-year-old woman because of post-traumatic stiffness in the dominant right elbow joint. During this procedure, the median and radial nerves were completely transected. A few recent reports of small series have described encouraging results after arthroscopic capsular release of post-traumatic elbow contracture, but the present case demonstrates the inherent risk of damage to neurovascular structures.
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ranking = 0.625
keywords = nerve
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5/74. Debilitating chronic pain syndromes after presumed intraneural injections.

    This report presents seven patients with severe disability established at the time of a peripheral nerve block. In most of the cases, the injection was administered as a routine procedure by an experienced anesthesiologist. The patient histories suggest that the condition, which can be resistant to all treatment, in most cases could have been avoided if careful attention had been given to the occurrence of pain during the nerve block. It is likely that the risk of devastating iatrogenic disability can be minimized if a few basic principles are respected during the administration of peripheral nerve blocks.
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ranking = 0.4677059809443
keywords = nerve, block
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6/74. Iatrogenic ulnar nerve injury after percutaneous cross-pinning of supracondylar fracture in a child.

    Supracondylar fracture of the humerus is the most common fracture of the elbow in children and has been treated by a variety of methods. Recently, stabilization of reduced fractures with percutaneous pin fixation has become the accepted method of treatment. ulnar nerve injury is a complication of percutaneous pinning of supracondylar fractures, although many authors have reported that it resolves spontaneously after removal of the pin.
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ranking = 0.625
keywords = nerve
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7/74. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of median nerve lesion after endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    Deterioration of pre-existing signs or appearance of a nerve deficit raise difficult problems during the complicated course following endoscopic carpal tunnel release. One possible explanation is transient aggravation of nerve compression by passage of the endoscopy material, but these signs may also be due to incomplete section of the flexor retinaculum or an iatrogenic nerve lesion. Each case raises the problem of surgical revision. The authors report three cases of open revision in which MRI allowed a very precise preoperative diagnosis of the lesions and all of the MR findings were confirmed during surgical revision. In the first case, MRI showed section of the most radial branches of the median nerve (collateral nerves of the thumb, index finger and radial collateral nerve of the middle finger). The proximal origin of the nerve of the 3rd web space, above the retinaculum, an anatomical variant, was also identified. Section of 2/3 of the nerve of the 3rd web space, proximal to the superficial palmar arch, was observed in the second case. Simple thickening of the nerve of the 3rd web space, without disruption after opening of the perineurium, was observed in the third case. MRI therefore appears to be an examination allowing early and precise definition of indications for surgical revision in this new iatrogenic disease.
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ranking = 1.625
keywords = nerve
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8/74. Permanent iatrogenic vocal cord paralysis after I-131 therapy: a case report and literature review.

    A patient who underwent I-131 therapy for a solitary toxic thyroid nodule subsequently experienced vocal cord paralysis, a rare complication. The patient was examined because of hoarseness 1 week after treatment. Indirect laryngoscopy at the time confirmed right vocal cord paralysis. When the examination was repeated in 6 months, no improvement was noted; vocal cord paralysis was then declared permanent. Surprisingly, 11 months after the onset of symptoms, the patient observed improvement in her voice. At 14 months, she experienced complete vocal recovery. However, a computed tomography performed after this showed that her right vocal cord paralysis was unresolved. The apparent complete recovery of her voice is believed to be a result of adaptive compensatory mechanisms. patients who recover from hoarseness after injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve should have cord function documented by indirect laryngoscopy or other means before the physician performs a procedure that could harm the contralateral nerve, because damage to this nerve could result in devastating consequences.
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ranking = 0.375
keywords = nerve
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9/74. Facilitation of atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia by iatrogenic right bundle branch block.

    The present case report describes the diagnosis of a concealed bypass tract in the right lateral wall revealed by electrophysiologic evaluation performed in a patient with rare palpitations. A iatrogenic right bundle branch block (RBBB) caused the occurrence of an incessant atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia. The disappearance of the RBBB determined a very difficult induction of the tachycardia that, when induced, showed a shorter cycle length and ventriculoatrial interval than those observed during RBBB tachycardia. The presence of a RBBB ipsilateral to the right free wall accessory pathway provided a critical delay within the circuit thus allowing the bypass tract to recover excitability. This relevant delay also allows the sinus beat to initiate and stabilize the tachycardia thus rendering it incessant.
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ranking = 0.1545099682405
keywords = block
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10/74. Latropathic injuries of peripheral nerves.

    This is a retrospective study of 612 cases of iatropathic injury to peripheral nerves seen in one tertiary referral unit between 1991 and 1998. A total of 291 patients was subsequently operated on to explore the nerve lesion. The most common presenting symptom was pain, which often masked underlying loss of function. The delay in diagnosis was up to 40 months. The findings at operation were analysed according to the type of nerve damaged, the nature of the injury and the referring specialty. Some of the more common causal operations and procedures are discussed. Preventive measures are listed, and early diagnosis and treatment are recommended.
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ranking = 0.875
keywords = nerve
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