Cases reported "Infant, Newborn, Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Probable intrafamilial transmission of coxsackievirus b3 with vertical transmission, severe early-onset neonatal hepatitis, and prolonged viral rna shedding.

    Here we report a familial cluster of 3 cases of coxsackievirus B3 infection: a recent history of illness in a woman's 3-year-old son with a coxsackievirus B3-positive stool culture indicated that he probably infected his mother at home during her last week of pregnancy. Consequently, she delivered an infected neonate who developed severe hepatitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and bilateral intracranial hemorrhage. The neonate remained well for the first 2 days of life. On the third day, he developed fever (39 degrees C) and poor peripheral circulation. On the fourth day, he developed petechiae and bruises over his chest wall and extremities, and prolonged bleeding was observed over venipuncture sites. Investigations revealed severe thrombocytopenia (platelets: 41 x 10(9)/L) and a markedly deranged coagulation profile (prothrombin time: 19 seconds [reference: < 10 seconds]; activated partial thromboplastin time: > 120 seconds [reference: 24.2-37.0 seconds], serum D-dimers: 6722 ng/mL [reference: < 500 ng/mL]), suggestive of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Clinical examination revealed yellow sclera, hepatomegaly (5 cm), and splenomegaly (2 cm), consistent with hepatitis. Serial chest radiographs showed bilateral pleural effusions, and an ultrasound of the abdomen demonstrated ascites. An echocardiogram showed normal cardiac structure and good contractility of both ventricles. However, a cranial ultrasound revealed bilateral grade 2 intraventricular hemorrhages. serum c-reactive protein increased to 33.9 mg/L. liver-function tests were also markedly deranged at this time, with maximum values for serum alanine transferase, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, and ammonia concentration of 1354 IU/L, 258 micromol/L, 189 IU/L, and 147 micromol/L, respectively. serum glucose levels were normal. Over the next 3 days, his fever subsided, and his liver function and clotting profile normalized by day 13 after onset of illness. A stool sample from the older brother, collected 14 days after his onset of illness at home, was positive for coxsackievirus B3 by both virus culture and enterovirus reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. He had neutralizing coxsackievirus B3 antibody titers of 1:2560 and 1:1280 on days 14 and 28 after his onset of illness, respectively. No virus was cultured from the mother's stool sample, collected 5 days after her onset of illness, but the enterovirus polymerase chain reaction was positive and maternal sera neutralized the coxsackievirus B3 isolated from the neonate. The maternal sera also showed a more than fourfold rise in antibody titer from 1:80 to 1:640 on days 5 and 16 after her onset of illness, respectively. Neonatal antibody titers also showed a more than fourfold rise from < 1:80 to 1:2560 on days 1 and 21 after his onset of illness, respectively. This demonstrates that both the mother and the neonate had had recent coxsackievirus B3 infections. Serially collected neonatal throat swab and stool samples were culture negative for enterovirus by 4 and 8 days after his onset of illness, respectively. However, enterovirus rna remained detectable by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in these samples for considerably longer, only becoming undetectable by 16, 23, and 41 days after his onset of illness. We show that even mild household infections may have potentially serious consequences for pregnant women and their infants.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Renal cyst puncture: a non-diagnostic procedure in the infant.

    A case of metastatic wilms tumor in a newborn is presented. Cyst puncture was included in the preoperative evaluation and the merits of this procedure in infants are questioned. The differential diagnosis of intrarenal masses in the neonate is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Pyocephalus of the newborn child.

    3 cases of pyocephalus (ventricular empyema) in newborn children are described and 16 cases from the literature are analyzed. Half of the previously published cases of pyocephalus are secondary to cerebral abscesses. Neuroradiological findings and especially the necroscopic study of a case demonstrated the existence of membranous blockages inside the ventricles which may make the circulation of CSF impossible. Our treatment of choice consists of repeated punctures and evacuations of purulent content and topic as well as parenteral administration of antibiotics. Further CSF derivative measures are almost always necessary. By these means, we believe the high mortality of these cases could be lowered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. factor vii deficiency.

    This report describes three patients with factor (F) VII deficiency: two adult siblings and an unrelated 5 1/2-month-old child who succumbed after several central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhages. This event prompted a review of the literature concerning the incidence and characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage in congenital F VII deficiency. Of 138 patients reported to have F VII deficiency, only 75 were considered to have a true deficiency. There was a 1:1 sex distribution with a 19% incidence of consanguinity in the 63 families which these 75 patients represented. CNS hemorrhage occurred in 12 of the 75 proven factor-deficient patients -- an incidence of 16.0%. There was a 1.4:1 female predominance in this group with a 44.4% incidence of consanguinity in their nine families. Except for one patient with hypertension, there was no history of preceding trauma or previous underlying CNS abnormality, though head trauma with a difficult vaginal delivery may have occurred in five infants. Diagnostic lumbar puncture or ventricular tap revealed bloody, xanthochromic cerebrospinal fluid in five. Five patients with F VII deficiency developed a CNS hemorrhage prior to 1 week of age, and none survived. Seven patients older than 1 week of age suffered such an event, and four of these survived. It is concluded that the greatest risk factor for development of CNS hemorrhage is trauma related to the birth process.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. Neonatal osteomyelitis of the calcaneus following a heel pad puncture: a case report.

    osteomyelitis of the calcaneus developed in a 6-day-old girl subsequent to heel pad puncture for taking blood samples. A review of the literature indicates that as a complication, osteomyelitis is very rare, considering the thousands of punctures performed. There is no mention in the orthopedic literature of such cases being treated in neonatal units. The present case, like others reported thus far, is characterized by the benign course of the disease. Theoretically, it is possible that infectious process could spread from the heel primary site to other bones or joints. Some difficulty in early diagnosis may be encountered in the incipient stages of the disease because of the benign course and lack of radiologic findings. In such cases, when local findings and the history of heel pad punctures suggest an infectious process involving the bone, a bone scan is helpful inasmuch as it is positive before the radiologic signs become manifest. An adequate course of antibiotic therapy, immediately administered, is usually successful, with normal X-ray of the healed os calcis being evident after two to three months. Nevertheless, prophylactic therapy is strongly recommended.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7
keywords = puncture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Infant, Newborn, Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.