Cases reported "Infection"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. infection-related atlantoaxial subluxation in two adults: Grisel syndrome or not?

    Grisel's syndrome involves the subluxation of the atlanto-axial joint from inflammatory ligamantous laxity following an infectious process in the head or neck. It is a rare disease usually affecting children, but infrequent adult cases do occur. Today, due to the widened use of antibiotics and availability of MR imaging, some cases presenting with neck pain, resulting from the infectious inflammation of C1 and C2 but without pronounced subluxation, can be a challenging problem for most neurosurgeons. Several theories have been proposed to explain the pathogenesis of inflammatory subluxation. The primary treatment of Grisel's syndrome is medical. The underlying infectious organism must be isolated and appropriate antibiotics must be prescribed. The subluxation is reduced in holter or skeletal traction. This paper reports two cases of infection-related atlanto-axial subluxation in two adults. The literature on this subject is briefly reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. Intravenous neck injections in a drug abuser resulting in infection of a laryngocele.

    A pyolaryngocele is an uncommon complication of a laryngocele that has become infected. We present a case of a pyolaryngocele that was probably due to repeated injections in the neck veins. The pathogenesis, clinical features and management are discussed in detail.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. Tuberculous deep neck infection in a soldier, preceding miliary tuberculosis: a diagnostic dilemma.

    tuberculosis can affect every organ, most importantly the lungs, and worldwide it is the leading cause of death attributable to a single infectious agent. Tuberculous involvement of the neck is also possible. patients mostly present with masses or draining fistulas in the neck, which are mostly located in the posterior cervical, submandibular, and supraclavicular regions. We report on a soldier who presented with a tuberculous deep neck infection, followed by miliary tuberculosis. The clinical presentation and diagnostic dilemmas are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. Deep neck infection as the main initial presentation of primary head and neck cancer.

    OBJECTIVES: Primary head and neck cancer and deep neck infection are not uncommon, but deep neck infection as the initial presentation of primary head and neck cancer is rare and these patients risk potential misdiagnosis. MATERIALS AND methods: The records of 301 patients with deep neck infection and 3,337 patients with primary head and neck cancers from 1990 to 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. patients with primary head and neck cancers who had deep neck infection as their initial presentation were enrolled. RESULTS: Seven patients were identified (six men and one woman). The median age was 64 years. All patients presented with painful, erythematous neck swelling and all image studies showed abscess formation. Four abscesses received needle aspiration and three received surgical drainage, which yielded malignant cells in four specimens. The primary origins of malignancies were the nasopharynx (two patients), oropharynx (two patients), hypopharynx (one patient), parotid gland (one patient) and maxillary sinus (one patient). All patients had stage IV disease. Only three patients could receive curative therapy and only one patient was disease-free after three years. CONCLUSION: We suggest that detailed history-taking, complete examination of the ENT field and pathological study of the infected tissue must be performed for patients with deep neck infection to enable early detection and prompt treatment of any underlying malignancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 9
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. Significance of abnormal indium In 111-labeled leukocyte accumulation in the head and neck region.

    The localization of occult infection is often a difficult clinical problem. In 1975, labeling of leukocytes with indium In 111 became technically feasible, and subsequent clinical experience with 111In-labeled leukocyte scanning demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity for acute infection. To our knowledge, experience with white blood cell scanning in the head and neck has not been previously reported. The University of california, san francisco, experience with 111In-labeled white blood cell scanning was reviewed. Between 1982 and 1987, 520 whole-body 111In-labeled leukocyte studies were performed, of which 60% were interpreted as abnormal. Eighteen studies were abnormal in the head and neck region, and the medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal findings correlated with other evidence of disease that involved mucosal surfaces, the neck, and the mediastinum. Sites in the nasopharynx with nasogastric tubes and tracheotomy sites were abnormal without associated clinical evidence of infection. Further clinical experience is needed to correlate white blood cell scan findings with disease in the head and neck and to define the role of the scan in diagnosis and management of otolaryngological disorders.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Grisel's syndrome. Cervical spine clinical, pathologic, and neurologic manifestations.

    Grisel's syndrome involves the subluxation of the atlantoaxial joint from inflammatory ligamentous laxity following an infectious process. Even though it was first described in 1830, it is a rare disease usually affecting children, but infrequent adult cases do occur. patients generally seek treatment for progressive unrelenting throat and neck pain followed by torticollis and subluxation. Neurologic complications occur in approximately 15% of cases and can range from radiculopathy to myelopathy and even death. Principles of management include bacteriologic cure and correction of bony deformity and neurologic protection. The authors present two adult patients with Grisel's syndrome. The first illustrates the permanent spinal deformity that can occur if the disease remains unrecognized for a prolonged period of time. The second case demonstrates a delayed neurologic complication in an adult who had Grisel's syndrome in childhood. It is hoped that these two examples, together with a detailed discussion of the literature, will inform physicians of an unusual but important condition to be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient complaining of neck pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. life-threatening deep fascial space infections of the head and neck.

    In the preantibiotic era, deep fascial space infections were common, and physicians were well acquainted with their complex and sometimes subtle manifestations. Widespread use of antibiotics, however, not only has significantly decreased the incidence of deep neck infections but also has altered their clinical manifestations. This article is designed to emphasize the key clinical manifestations of the several life-threatening deep neck infections and relate them to critically important anatomic structures in the neck.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. Dermatologic manifestations of infections in immunocompromised patients.

    Thirty-one immunocompromised patients (22 renal allograft recipients, 5 patients receiving chronic corticosteroid therapy, and 4 patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia) with significant dermatologic infection, excluding typical cellulitis and herpesvirus infections, were retrospectively identified over a 12-year period. Of these 31 patients, 15 (48%) had infection restricted to their skin, 6 (19%) appeared to have primary cutaneous infection that spread hematogenously to other parts of the body, 2 (6%) had infections of adjoining nasal tissue that spread to contiguous skin, and 8 (26%) appeared to have disseminated systemic infection that spread to the skin. In six of the eight patients with apparent secondary skin involvement, the development of the cutaneous lesion was the first clinical indication of disseminated infection. Eleven immunocompromised patients (35%) with bacterial infection of the skin or subcutaneous tissue were identified. These patients could be divided into three categories: leukemic patients with bacteremic gram-negative infection metastasizing to the skin (3 cases), renal transplant recipients with recurrent staphylococcal infection on and around the elbow ("transplant elbow") or streptococcal sepsis from a site of cellulitis (5 cases), and immunocompromised patients with opportunistic bacterial infection due to nocardia asteroides or atypical mycobacteria (3 cases). Seventeen immunocompromised patients (55%) with fungal infection of the skin or subcutaneous tissue were identified. These included 12 patients with opportunistic fungal infection (cryptococcus neoformans, 4 cases; aspergillus species, 3 cases; paecilomyces, 2 cases; rhizopus species, 2 cases; and candida tropicalis, 1 case) and 5 patients with extensive, confluent cutaneous dermatophyte infections. One patient with protothecosis and two patients with extensive papillomavirus infection were identified. Of these latter two cases, one had his immunosuppression discontinued, with clearing of his extensive warts; the other had confluent warts of the face and neck that subsequently underwent malignant degeneration to squamous cell carcinoma while chronic immunosuppressive therapy was continued.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. head and neck manifestations of uncommon infectious diseases.

    Certain uncommon systemic infections may be present with head and neck manifestations either initially or during the course of the disease. A high index of suspicion is required on the part of the otolaryngologist with the subsequent procedures leading to the appropriate diagnosis. The manifestations of infectious diseases such as erysipelas, histoplasmosis, rabies, tetanus, botulism, and cysticercosis must be understood by the head and neck specialist. For successful management, many of the infections require prompt identification and initiation of therapy. Airway maintenance, ventilatory support, and medical chemotherapy may be required.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. diagnosis and management of complications of self-injection injuries of the neck.

    When IVDUs who lose peripheral access turn to their necks, they invite a spectrum of unique complications that require particular management and treatment. While many of these complications are infectious, other possibilities include vocal cord paralysis and needle fragment foreign bodies. work-up of these patients must include a very thorough history and physical exam, particularly of the head and neck, complete with a laryngeal exam. All patients should undergo imaging studies, including plain films, CT or MRI of the neck, and other studies as appropriate. Laboratory studies should include hiv and hepatitis serologies. Because of the risks to the surgical team, neck explorations, when indicated, should be performed under general anesthesia with strict adherence to universal precautions. Further management includes early referrals to methadone clinics, although unfortunately poor patient compliance is usual. Public campaigns aimed at prevention are useful, although limited, and should be encouraged.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Infection'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.