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1/117. A case of urachal remnant presenting as acute abdominal pain.

    A 30-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department, over sequential visits, with abdominal complaints. The patient's presenting history and physical examination were mistakenly diagnosed variously as gastroenteritis, omphalitis, and appendicitis. Ultimately, the diagnosis of urachal fistula was made at surgery. This case is discussed in light of prior published experiences with this disease entity.
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2/117. Disseminated cystic lymphangiomatosis presenting with acute abdomen: report of a case and review of the literature.

    lymphangioma is an uncommon tumor. Lymphangiomatosis, a benign tumor consisting of a cluster of dilated lymphatic channels, is very unusual. Most lymphangiomatoses are found in the neck and head area. Less than 5% are diagnosed intraabdominally and they are very infrequently encountered in the retroperitoneal area. Herein, we report a rare case of a 32 year-old woman who had disseminated intra-abdominal and retroperitoneal cystic lymphangiomatosis, which presented as acute abdomen. She received exploratory laparotomy due to the suspicion of malignancy, which was finally confirmed as cystic lymphangiomatosis. The clinical manifestations, imaging features, and management of this patient are discussed and compared with previous literature.
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3/117. Acute abdominal pain and eosinophilia, two cases of eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

    Two patients are presented who were admitted with acute abdominal pain for which they underwent laparotomy. No clear-cut diagnosis could be established during operation. Eventually, eosinophilic gastroenteritis was diagnosed and treated with corticosteroids. The heterogeneous presentation of eosinophilic gastroenteritis is discussed, ranging from mild non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms to an acute abdominal emergency prompting surgical intervention. The pathogenesis and treatment of eosinophilic gastroenteritis are discussed.
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4/117. Acute abdomen in mentally retarded patients: role of aerophagia. Report of nine cases.

    Between 1993 and 1996 nine mentally retarded patients presented because of an acute abdomen. All had the habit of aerophagia, diagnosed previously by a general practitioner. Massive distension of the bowel led to ileus, volvulus, and necrosis. After placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy catheter or performing a gastrostomy during laparotomy with the intention to use as a desufflator, no recurrence of the signs and symptoms of an acute abdomen were observed.
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5/117. Abdominal pregnancy in a 67-year-old woman undetected for 37 years. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Abdominal pregnancy is an exceedingly rare occurrence, but even more unusual is prolonged retention of an advanced abdominal pregnancy with lithopedion formation. We present the case of prolonged retention of an advanced abdominal pregnancy in an elderly women. CASE: A 67-year-old, white woman presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. An acute abdominal series revealed a fetal skeleton extending from the patient's pelvis to her lower costal margins. Pelvic examination revealed a normal postmenopausal uterus, and human chorionic gonadotropin was negative. On further questioning the patient reported that she had become pregnant 37 years earlier and was diagnosed as having a "missed" pregnancy. She refused intervention at that time but suffered no untoward consequences. She reported having had later a healthy intrauterine pregnancy, delivered vaginally at term. No attempt was made to remove the prior missed abdominal pregnancy. The acute pain episode resolved, and there was no surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: Abdominal pregnancies can have a complex course, and management decisions can be difficult. This case presents an unusual outcome of an advanced abdominal pregnancy and illustrates a unique approach to management.
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6/117. Epiploic appendagitis: adding to the differential of acute abdominal pain.

    We report a patient with epiploic appendagitis who presented with acute abdominal pain. Emergency Department and discharge courses are described. The pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this disorder are discussed. knowledge of this uncommonly diagnosed entity and its usual benign course may allow the Emergency Physician to order the appropriate studies to help avoid unnecessary surgical treatment.
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7/117. Accidentally delayed diagnosis of ruptured ovarian carcinoma in a young woman: a care report.

    Ovarian carcinoma commonly occurs in postmenopausal women and often presents with an insidious course. Acute abdomen is rarely an initial symptom. When these patients present with abdominal discomfort, the disease has already spread throughout the peritoneal cavity. We present a case of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in a young woman who presented with acute abdomen and intra-abdominal bleeding. This 24-year-old woman was previously diagnosed with a ruptured left ovarian cystic tumor at a primary clinic. She underwent emergency exploratory laparotomy, followed by unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy at the clinic. No thorough examination of the peritoneal cavity was done during surgery. The diagnosis of mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was accidentally over-looked until one month later when she returned for routine follow-up. Upon referral to our clinic, the patient underwent a repeat laparotomy. The surgicopathologic diagnosis was intraperitoneal carcinomatosis stage IIIC that could not be excised completely, even though rigorous staging surgery including washing cytology, total abdominal hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, appendectomy, infracolic omentectomy and excision of any suspicious and removable lesions were performed. This case alerts us to consider the possibility of ovarian malignancy when a young woman presents with an acute abdomen secondary to ruptured ovarian cystic tumor and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Careful preoperative preparation and thorough intrasurgical examination of the peritoneal cavity along with a prompt pathologic diagnosis of suspicious lesions will prevent missed diagnoses.
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8/117. Case report: portal vein thrombosis associated with hereditary protein c deficiency: a report of two cases.

    protein c deficiency is one of the causes of curable or preventable portal vein thrombosis. We report two patients of portal vein thrombosis associated with hereditary protein c deficiency. The first patient presented with continuous right upper quadrant pain and high fever. The abdominal sonography revealed normal liver parenchyma but portal vein and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis. Based on a 55% (normal 70-140%) plasma protein C level, he was diagnosed as having protein c deficiency. A trace of his family history showed that his elder brother also had protein c deficiency with a 50% plasma C level. Both patients received anticoagulant therapy. The younger brother showed good response. Unfortunately, the elder one suffered from recurrent episodes of variceal bleeding and received a life-saving splenectomy and devascularization. We herein remind clinicians that early screening and therapy are helpful in preventing late complications of protein c deficiency with portal vein thrombosis.
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9/117. Ruptured metastatic ovarian carcinoma presenting as acute abdomen.

    Acute abdomen is a challenge to first-line physicians because of frequently missed diagnoses and potential follow-on legal problems. Improving the management of these patients is of paramount importance, not only for saving lives, but also for reducing untoward problems associated with improper management. We present a case of a patient with acute abdomen due to intraperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to rupture of an ovarian tumor. Following emergency surgery, the patient was diagnosed with metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Because of improper preparation of the gastrointestinal tract, the patient underwent repeat exploratory laparotomy for colon carcinoma. Although this situation did not affect the outcome of the patient in this case, we are concerned that the patient did not benefit from a single operation, with primary complete excision of the tumor plus a colostomy. The outcome of patients with pelvic malignancy, especially those with ovarian carcinoma, might be better if initial surgery achieved optimal tumor debulking. This is possible with good preoperative planning and preparation. We emphasize the importance of preoperative preparation in spite of urgently needed care. Furthermore, every first-line physician should communicate the possibility of malignancy to patients and their families.
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10/117. Agenesis of the vermiform appendix.

    Agenesis of the vermiform appendix is very rare. The incidence is estimated to be one in 100,000 laparotomies for suspected appendicitis. Several criteria have to be met before the investigator can conclude that the appendix is congenitally absent. This case is reported to bring this entity to the attention of surgeons who may encounter a similar situation during celioscopy. A 29-year-old patient was admitted through the emergency room with the chief complaint of abdominal pain. Acute appendicitis was suspected, and he was accordingly prepared for celioscopy. This report presents a patient with vermiform appendix agenesis diagnosed at celioscopy with concomitant mesenteric lymphadenitis. Agenesis of the vermiform appendix is very rare, and the diagnosis should not be made unless the ileocecal and retrocecal area are thoroughly explored.
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