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1/8. Intestinal amebiasis: a diagnosis not to be missed.

    entamoeba histolytica is a well-recognized cause of infectious colitis and disseminated amebic abscesses. Most prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, E. histolytica infections may also occur in the developed world. We describe a case of a North American traveler with intestinal amebiasis, a diagnosis first made by colonic biopsy. We review the available diagnostic tools and the role of the surgical pathologist in the detection of this infection.
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ranking = 1
keywords = histolytica
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2/8. A patient with intestinal amoebiasis and cutaneous amoebic ulcer.

    This paper reports a patient with intestinal amoebiasis in concomitant with amoebic ulcer in the thigh. The ulcer was suspected to be carcinoma, complicated cutaneous leishmaniasis or due to free-living amoebae. The diagnosis was confirmed by the pathological and parasitological demonstration of haematophagous trophozoites of E. histolytica. The patient was successfully treated with metronidazole.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = histolytica
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3/8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome associated with entamoeba histolytica intestinal infection.

    amebiasis secondary to entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica) continues to be a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide, mainly in developing countries. An association between amebic dysentery and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been mentioned, but a cause-and-effect relationship has never been confirmed. We report the case of an 11-year-old healthy white female who developed severe bloody diarrhea after drinking contaminated unboiled water, developing classic HUS and requiring acute intermittent hemodialysis. The etiological study confirmed numerous cysts and hematophagous trophozoites of E. histolytica on stool smear, but without evidence of other pathogens. This report contributes to the concept that classic post-diarrheal HUS, usually related to colitis secondary to enterohemorragic Shiga-toxin producing escherichia coli (E.coli) strains, may be associated with other pathogens, including E. histolytica. Additional information regarding mechanisms of virulence of E. histolytica and host immunological reaction is needed to clarify the temporal association of these two disorders (HUS and amebiasis).
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ranking = 4.5
keywords = histolytica
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4/8. prevalence of enteric parasites in homosexual patients attending an outpatient clinic.

    A total of 372 pooled stool specimens from 274 homosexual men with diarrhea were submitted for parasitologic examination over a 2.5-year period. Each two-vial pooled specimen set contained portions of stool from 3 consecutive days in Formalin and polyvinyl alcohol. Of the 274 patients, 133 (48.5%) harbored one or more intestinal protozoa, with 161 (43.3%) of the 372 specimens submitted being positive for one or more organisms. The parasites identified included entamoeba histolytica (71 patients), giardia lamblia (22 patients), endolimax nana (106 patients), Entamoeba coli (39 patients), Entamoeba hartmanni (25 patients), dientamoeba fragilis (3 patients), Iodamoeba butschlii (2 patients), and Chilomastix mesnili (2 patients). cryptosporidium sp. (2 patients) and isospora belli (1 patient) were also detected. Results of this study support the experience of other workers regarding high rates of infection with intestinal parasites in the homosexual population and also indicate that symptomatic individuals belonging to this acquired immunodeficiency syndrome risk group be screened for both common and uncommon intestinal pathogens.
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ranking = 0.67993720011757
keywords = histolytica, entamoeba
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5/8. dientamoeba fragilis: a bowel pathogen?

    Although many patients infected with dientamoeba fragilis suffer gastrointestinal symptoms, controversy still surrounds the pathogenic role of this intestinal protozoan. We describe three patients infected with D fragilis who had gastrointestinal symptoms. In the first patient symptoms resolved with therapy before the protozoan was eradicated from the stool, however in the second, symptoms persisted unabated despite clearing of the organism. In the third patient, symptoms resolution was associated with effective treatment. We discuss the life cycle, diagnosis and treatment of this organism and its role as a pathogen.
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ranking = 0.89968600058783
keywords = entamoeba
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6/8. Intestinal parasites in homosexual men.

    A study on the prevalence of intestinal parasites in a group of homosexual men, attending a sexually-transmitted diseases clinic in Glasgow, was undertaken. Of 118 men examined over an eight-month period, four, one of whom had symptoms of dysentery, were found to be infected with entamoeba histolytica. cysts of Iodamoeba buetschlii were also found in the stool of one of these men. A further two patients had giardiasis, and 11 men had enterobiasis. The importance of an awareness of these conditions is discussed.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = histolytica
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7/8. giardiasis and other intestinal parasitic infections in a manitoba residential school for the mentally retarded.

    A case of severely symptomatic giardiasis in a school for the mentally retarded prompted an epidemiologic survey of the institution. The rate of parasitic infection in the children were just under 50%. Multiple infections were common and one child harboured five different protozoa. The yield included known pathogens (giardia lamblia, Metorchis conjunctus and diphyllobothrium sp.), protozoa of potential pathogenicity (dientamoeba fragilis) and other protozoa, the significance of which has yet to be determined. The prevalence of G. lamblia in the index ward was significantly higher than in a control ward matched for age and mobility of the children. The epidemiologic data suggested person-to-person transmission of G. lamblia within the institution. Recommendations for the control of protozoal intestinal infections in custodial institutions are presented.
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ranking = 0.17993720011757
keywords = entamoeba
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8/8. amebiasis and "nonpathogenic" intestinal protozoa.

    infection with single or multiple species of intestinal protozoa is common in humans and can result in either asymptomatic colonization or symptoms of intestinal disease. entamoeba histolytica serves as a paradigm for invasive colonic protozoal infection. The key to diagnosis and treatment of amebiasis is knowledge of the epidemiologic risk factors and clinical manifestations, a rational approach to diagnosis, and an understanding of the sites of action and uses of anti-amebic drugs. This knowledge of treatment provides a context for consideration of intestinal infection with less common protozoan pathogens such as dientamoeba fragilis and balantidium coli and 'nonpathogenic' protozoa such as blastocystis hominis and Entamoeba coli.
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ranking = 0.67993720011757
keywords = histolytica, entamoeba
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