Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/26. A case of strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    strongyloidiasis has been recognized as one of the life-threatening parasitic infections in the immunocompromised patients. We report an intestinal infection case of strongyloides stercoralis in a 61-year-old man. Rhabditiform larvae were detected in the stool examination and developed to filariform larvae having a notched tail through the Harada-Mori filter paper culture. The patient received five courses of albendazole therapy but not cured of strongyloidiasis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/26. strongyloides stercoralis: ultrastructural study of newly hatched larvae within human duodenal mucosa.

    AIM: To investigate the ultrastructural features of the newly hatched larvae of strongyloides stercoralis in human duodenal mucosa. methods: Duodenal biopsies from an AIDS patient were studied by transmission electron microscopy to investigate morphology, location, and host-worm relations of newly hatched larvae. RESULTS: Newly hatched larvae were found in the Lieberkuhn crypts within the tunnels formed by migration of parthenogenic females. Delimiting enterocytes were compressed. Release of larvae into the gut lumen was also documented. It was shown that both a thin and a thick membrane surrounded the eggs and larvae, as a tegument derived respectively from parasite and host. Segmentary spike-like waves, caused by contractures of worm body musculature, were observed on the surface of newly hatched larvae, and their intestinal lumen was closed and empty, with no budding microvilli. Immaturity of the cuticle and some degree immaturity of amphidial neurones were found, but there was no evidence of either immaturity or signs of damage to other structures. CONCLUSIONS: Newly hatched larvae of S stercoralis appear to be a non-feeding immature stage capable of active movement through the epithelium, causing mechanical damage. The tegument resulting from the thin and the thick membrane may protect the parasite and reduce any disadvantage caused by immaturity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/26. myxobolus sp., another opportunistic parasite in immunosuppressed patients?

    During a study of intestinal parasitic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients, a parasite belonging to the phylum myxozoa, recently described from human samples, was identified in one sample. When this parasite was stained by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining method, the features of the spores were identified: they were pyriform in shape, had thick walls, and had one suture and two polar capsules, with each one having four or five coils. The suture and two polar capsules were observed with the chromotrope-modified stain. The number of stools passed was more than 30 per day, but oocysts of isospora belli were also found. Upon reexamination of some formalin- or merthiolate-iodine-formaldehyde-preserved samples an identical parasite was found in another sample from a patient presenting with diarrhea. strongyloides stercoralis larvae and eggs of hymenolepis nana and ascaris lumbricoides were also found in this sample. Given that both patients were also infected with other pathogens that cause diarrhea, the possible pathogenic role of this parasite could not be established. The probable route of infection also could not be established.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/26. A patient with eosinophilia, hypoalbuminemia and abdominal pain.

    strongyloides stercoralis infections frequently present with eosinophilia and abdominal pain. Since the gastrointestinal symptoms are non-specific, only 15 percent of these patients are correctly considered to have an infectious enteritis or intestinal parasite. In fact, the initial diagnosis is peptic ulcer disease in most patients. The clinical course may be indolent, or patients may develop a sudden catastrophic illness, particularly following the administration of corticosteroids.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/26. Disseminated strongyloidiasis in AIDS: uncommon but important.

    Disseminated strongyloides stercoralis infection is a rare and severe but treatable complication of AIDS. We present a case where this infection was successfully treated and review the available literature. Cases may present many years after they have left an area endemic for Strongyloides infection, emphasizing the need for a full travel history. Symptoms are typically gastrointestinal and pulmonary, with infiltrates often seen on chest radiography. diagnosis requires stool examination and biopsy of affected sites. Treatment with repeated courses of thiabendazole (25 mg/kg twice daily for 5 days) was successful in our case, but maintenance regimens have not yet been defined. The relative rarity of this complication of AIDS suggests that, where both infections are present, disseminated strongyloidiasis only arises either when hiv-induced immunodeficiency is profound or, possibly, when it is accompanied by impaired granulopoiesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/26. strongyloidiasis associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I infection in a nonendemic area.

    Concomitant strongyloidiasis and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection has been reported from areas in japan where both organisms are endemic. We present four cases of concomitant infection with these organisms from an area that is not endemic for strongyloides stercoralis. Three of the four patients had adult T-cell leukemia, an aggressive neoplasm resulting from HTLV-I infection, while the other was an asymptomatic carrier of HTLV-I. Three of the patients had spent their childhoods in an endemic location for both organisms, suggesting an initial infection at that time. Three patients were symptomatic from their parasitism. We conclude that strongyloidiasis may be found in nonendemic locations in patients with either adult T-cell leukemia or an asymptomatic HTLV-I carrier state. Whether infestation with this parasite contributes to the leukemogenesis of HTLV-I, as postulated by others, cannot at this time be determined.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/26. Arteriomesenteric duodenal occlusion associated with strongyloidiasis.

    Arteriomesenteric occlusion of the distal duodenum may occur in clinical conditions which result in narrowing of the angle between the aorta and superior mesenteric artery. Two patients with arteriomesenteric duodenal occlusion associated with strongyloides stercoralis infection are described. In one patient the mechanism of occlusion appeared to be significant weight loss and associated visceroptosis, while in the other patient increased diameter of superior mesenteric vessels was the major factor. strongyloidiasis, a curable parasitic infection, should be considered in patients presenting with arteriomesenteric occlusion of the distal duodenum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/26. strongyloidiasis. An unusual cause of colonic pseudopolyposis and gastrointestinal bleeding.

    This report describes a recent case in which colonoscopy of a patient with the presenting complaint of rectal bleeding revealed the right colon to be carpeted with 50-100 pseudopolyps, each 3-4 mm in diameter. biopsy specimens taken during colonoscopy revealed the presence of strongyloides stercoralis in the bowel wall. This diagnosis should be considered in any patient with gastrointestinal complaints and a history of travel to an endemic area.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/26. Overwhelming strongyloidiasis: an unappreciated opportunistic infection.

    strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode which infects a large portion of the world's population. Individuals with infection confined to the intestinal tract are often asymptomatic but may have abdominal pain, weight loss, diarrhea, and other nonspecific complaints. Enhanced proliferation of the parasite in compromised hosts causes an augmentation of the normal life-cycle. Resultant massive invasion of the gastrointestinal tract and lungs is termed the hyperinfection syndrome. If the worm burden is excessive, parasitic invasion of other tissues occurs and is termed disseminated strongyloidiasis. A variety of underlying conditions appear to predispose to severe infections. These are primarily diseases characterized by immunodeficiency due to defective T-lymphocyte function (Table 1). Individuals with less severe disorders become compromised hosts because of therapeutic regimens consisting of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive medication. The debilitation of chronic illness or malnutrition also predisposes to systemic stronglyloidiasis. The diagnosis of strongyloidiasis can be readily made by microscopic examination of concentrates of upper small bowel fluid, stool, or sputum. Important clues suggesting this infection include unexplained gram-negative bacillary bacteremia in a compromised host who may have vague abdominal complaints, an ileus pattern on X-ray, and pulmonary infiltrates. eosinophilia is helpful, if present, but should not be relied upon to exclude the diagnosis. The treatment of systemic infection due to strongyloides stercoralis with either thiabensazole 25 mg/kg orally twice daily is satisfactory if the diagnosis is made early. Because of several unusual features of this illness in compromised hosts, the standard recommendation for 2 days of therapy should be abandoned in such patients. Immunodeficiency, corticosteroids, and bowel ileus reduce drug efficacy. Thus a longer treatment period of at leuch as blind loops or diverticula necessitate longer treatment. Stool specimens and upper small bowel aspirates should be monitored regularly and treatment continued several days beyond the last evidence of the parasite. In particularly difficult situations where either worm eradication is impossible or reinfection is probable, short monthly courses of antihelminthic therapy seem to be effective in averting recurrent systemic illness. Finally, prevention of hyperinfection or dissemination due to strongyloides stercoralis can be accomplished by screening immunocompromised hosts with stool and upper small bowel aspirate examinations. These would be especially important prior to initiating chemotherapy, or before giving immunosuppressive medications or corticosteroids to patients with nonneoplastic conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, nephrotic syndrome, or renal allografts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.6
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/26. strongyloidiasis in childhood.

    strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode of man that is still regularly encountered in many parts of the united states. strongyloidiasis should be considered in any child with unexplained eosinophilia, steatorrhea, protein-losing enteropathy, or chronic diarrhea, especially if associated with weight loss, growth failure, or recurrent upper abdominal pain. This parasite should be ruled out in any patient from an endemic region who is to be treated with corticosteroids of immunosuppressive agents. Microscopical examination of duodenal fluid, Baermann's fecal extraction technique, or the Haradi-Mori stool culture method may be required to make a diagnosis because the organism is not routinely found in concentrated feces even after multiple examinations in some infected individuals. A diagnosis of strongyloidiasis is important because the disease is curable.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.