Cases reported "Intestinal Fistula"

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11/52. Split notochord syndrome variant: prenatal findings and neonatal management.

    Spilt notochord syndrome is an extremely rare form of spinal dysraphism characterized by a complete cleft of the spine and a persistent communication between endoderm and ectoderm. A variant of split notochord syndrome was diagnosed in a 25-week-old fetus showing a prolapsed congenital colostomy and a spinal cystic lesion. The final diagnosis included protruding colon segment, imperforate anus with a rectourethral fistula and lipomyelomeningocele. The ultrasound features of the condition and the post-natal management are discussed. The neonate was successfully treated with a posterior sagittal anorectoplasty, while the lipomyelomeningocele was resected at a later stage.
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12/52. Aortoenteric fistula to the sigmoid colon-case report.

    Aortoenteric fistula is defined as a communication between the aorta and any adjacent segment of the bowel. It may be primary or secondary. The former occurs de novo in patients with intestinal or vascular diseases, whereas secondary aortoenteric fistula is a rare and dreadful complication of aortic reconstruction with vascular prosthesis. We report a case of a 62-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with acute rectal bleeding. The patient had previous aortoiliac surgery with the utilization of an aorto-bifemoral vascular graft. diagnosis of secondary aortoenteric fistula was made between the aortoiliac graft and sigmoid colon. After exploratory laparotomy, Hartmann's procedure, excision of the graft, oversewing of the aortic stump, and axilobifemoral bypass were successfully performed. This study reports a rare type of secondary aortoenteric fistula to the left colon, and it describes an unusual and successful surgical treatment.
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13/52. Parapapillary choledochoduodenal fistula associated with cholangiocarcinoma.

    Parapapillary choledochoduodenal fistula is a rare disorder. We herein report a case of parapapillary choledochoduodenal fistula associated with cholangiocarcinoma. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of a liver tumor. She had no clinical symptoms, but computed tomography scans showed an irregularly contoured liver tumor which was histologically confirmed to be adenocarcinoma, by a needle biopsy examination. Duodenal fiberscopy revealed a fistula orifice 1.0 cm proximal to the orifice of the papilla of Vater, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography through the fistula showed a communication to the common bile duct. Hypotonic duodenography demonstrated reflux of contrast material into the choledochoduodenal fistula. The bile sample collected from the common bile duct showed extremely high levels of pancreatic enzymes, including amylase, phospholipase-A2, and elastase-I. Furthermore, helicobacter dna was detected in bile by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. This experience suggests to us that parapapillary choledochoduodenal fistula may be a risk factor for biliary tract carcinoma, and surgical management is the treatment of choice for this rare condition, even when the patient has no significant clinical symptoms.
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14/52. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to primary aortoduodenal fistula: report of two rare cases.

    Primary aortoduodenal fistulas are among the rare causes of gastrointestinal hemorrhage and are defined as communications between the native abdominal aorta and the duodenum. The mortality rate is very high if undiagnosed and untreated. Two male patients, 61- and 76-years-old, were admitted to the emergency unit at different times with the chief complaints of abdominal pain, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and pulsatile mass in their abdomen. The first case experienced sudden massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding while being prepared for an emergency operation in the intensive care unit, and cardiac arrest developed within a few minutes. After resuscitation and successful surgical operation, the patient woke up without any neurological defect or sequelae and was extubated at the 9th postoperative hour. The second patient, who had been wounded by gun shot 30 years previously was admitted to the hospital because of simple gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A para-aortic pseudo-aneurysm connected with the duodenum was diagnosed by computed tomography. After successful surgical operation, the patient was discharged. In this report, a case of ruptured primary aortic aneurysm and another case of para-aortic pseudo-aneurysm connected with the duodenum, both of which were treated successfully by surgical operation, are presented.
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15/52. Recurrent aortoenteric fistula: case report and review.

    Aortoenteric fistulas (AEFs) are abnormal communications between the aorta and the bowel most frequently resulting from prosthetic graft erosion. Despite advances in surgery and medical technology, these entities are still associated with significant morbidity and mortality for the patient. Multiple case reports and reviews have attempted to elucidate the nature of AEFs in an effort to better characterize and manage these entities. However, reports of recurrence of this process are extremely rare. In this article, we describe a unique case of recurrence of an AEF that was successfully managed with primary aortic oversew and bowel resection. We will also review the literature on AEFs with a comprehensive overview on background, presentation, diagnosis, and current management options.
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16/52. Pneumobilia: benign or life-threatening.

    Pneumobilia, or air within the biliary tree of the liver, suggests an abnormal communication between the biliary tract and the intestines, or infection by gas-forming bacteria. Pneumobilia usually can be distinguished from air in the portal venous system by its appearance on computed tomography (CT) scan. The most common conditions associated with pneumobilia include: 1) a biliary-enteric surgical anastamosis, 2) an incompetent sphincter of oddi, or 3) a spontaneous biliary-enteric fistula. Three cases of pneumobilia associated with its most common causes are presented and further differential diagnostic possibilities as well as the implications of this finding on patient management are discussed.
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17/52. Primary aortoduodenal fistula without abdominal aortic aneurysm in association with psoas abscess.

    Primary aortoenteric fistula (PAEF) is a communication between the aorta and the enteric tract without any previous vascular intervention, e.g., aortic grafting. Although rare, PAEF is a potentially lethal condition that requires a high index of suspicion and prompt surgical intervention. Most of the reported cases involve an abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, in this report, we describe a rare case of a primary aortoduodenal fistula in a nonaneurysmal aorta in association with a psoas abscess, which was treated successfully. At 2-year follow-up, the patient is alive without episodes of bleeding or fever.
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18/52. Fecopneumothorax and colopleural fistula - uncommon complications of Crohn's disease.

    BACKGROUND: Colopleural fistula and fecopneumothorax are very rare complications of Crohn's disease. fistula formation is frequent in Crohn's disease and occurs in approximately 33% of patients. On the other hand, fistulous communication between the pleural cavity and adjacent organs below the diaphragm is extremely rare. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe the case of 27 year-old female with colopleural fistula as a complication of Crohn's disease. The diagnosis was established with clinical exam, barium enema, chest X-ray, abdominal and chest CT exam. The treatment was surgical. CONCLUSION: Colopleural fistula and fecopneumothorax are rare but life treating complications of Crohn's disease. Surgical treatment is mandatory as soon as the diagnosis is established.
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19/52. Coloseminal vesicle fistula: report of a case and review of the literature.

    Despite their anatomic proximity, communication between the colorectum and seminal vesicle is an uncommon event. We describe the first reported case of a fistula between the colon and seminal vesicle as a complication of diverticulitis. This case report is followed by a literature review of other reported cases of fistula formation between the seminal vesicle and the colon.
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20/52. Differentiating enterocutaneous fistulae from suture abscesses complicating Crohn's disease using oral administration of indocyanine green.

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Clinicians encounter difficulties distinguishing enterocutaneous fistulae from postoperative suture abscesses solely by diagnostic imaging in patients with Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to examine whether use of intraintestinal administration of indocyanine green (ICG) could differentiate the conditions. methods: Twenty-four patients with Crohn's disease and a possible enterocutaneous fistula at the abdominal wall based on manifestations of pus drainage and exudate were enrolled. A positive test was defined by macroscopic confirmation of staining by ICG dye, which had been administered orally, on the gauze dressing applied to the lesion site. RESULTS: Positive responses occurred in 16 of the 24 patients. In 13 of the 16 positive patients, a fistulous communication between the lesion and the gastrointestinal tract was documented by either surgery or X-ray examination. In the remaining three, fistulae were completely closed after administration of infliximab. The positive predictive value of the oral ICG test was 16/16 (100%). Six of the eight negative oral ICG test patients (75%) had subcutaneous (silk-suture) abscesses that were easily closed following fistulotomy. The other two patients had fistulas confirmed either by surgery or fistulography, indicating a false negative response from the oral ICG test. The negative predictive value of the oral ICG test was 6/8 (75%); thus, the ability of the oral ICG test to correctly diagnose was 22/24 (92%). CONCLUSIONS: This oral ICG test offers a suitable methodology for those patients possessing an occult fistulous lesion at an early stage, and where a differential diagnosis is difficult using diagnostic imaging.
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