Cases reported "Intestinal Obstruction"

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1/11. Small bowel obstruction caused by anisakiasis of the small intestine: report of a case.

    Enteric anisakiasis is a relatively rare disease that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. We report a case of small bowel obstruction caused by enteric anisakiasis in a 59-year-old Japanese man who presented with abdominal pain a few hours after eating sliced, raw fish. Because of signs of an intestinal obstruction, a laparotomy was performed. Focal thickening and stenosis of the ileocecal region were seen about 100 cm from the end of the ileum and the lesion was excised. We found a moving anisakis thrusting its head into the mucosa of the excised small intestine. Histopathological examination revealed the infiltration of eosinophils in all layers of the intestinal wall and severe edema. Enteric anisakiasis is very rare, and its diagnosis is usually only made after laparotomy. Nevertheless, when signs of acute abdomen develop after the ingestion of raw fish, such as sushi or sashimi, the possibility of enteric anisakiasis should be borne in mind.
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2/11. anisakiasis of the colon presenting as bowel obstruction.

    anisakiasis is a disease caused by human infection by the anisakis larvae, a marine nematode found in raw or undercooked fish. With the increased popularity of eating sushi and raw fish (sashimi) in the united states infection with anisakis is expected to rise. We present the first reported case in the united states of intestinal anisakiasis presenting as a bowel obstruction. A 25-year-old healthy woman with no prior history of surgery presented to the emergency room with bowel obstruction by history and CT. CT also showed a mass in the right lower quadrant. She had eaten seviche, a raw fish appetizer, 2 days earlier and sashimi 3 weeks before admission. She was taken to the operating room for an exploratory laparotomy and was found to have an obstruction, the 2-cm mass in the mesentery, and diffuse mesenteric adenopathy. She had an ileocolectomy. pathology showed a degenerating fish worm, anisakiasis. She also had a serologic test for immunoglobulin e specific to anisakiasis and it was highly positive. Human infections, as mentioned before, are principally the result of ingestion of the anisakis larvae. These larvae are usually found in herring, mackerel, salmon, cod, halibut, rockfish, sardine, and squid. Most human infections have been reported from japan and The netherlands and involve the stomach. Invasion of the gastric or intestinal wall one to 5 days after eating raw fish may be characterized by the abrupt onset of abdominal pain, nausea and/or vomiting, diarrhea, or an ileus. For transient anisakiasis, supportive measures and reassurance are all that is needed. If the larvae have invaded the intestine or the stomach wall diagnosis and cure occur with endoscopic or surgical removal if evidence of obstruction or perforation is found. The incidence of anisakiasis in the united states is unknown but will likely continue to increase with the popularity of eating sashimi. This case is meant to demonstrate another possible cause for bowel obstruction in the patient who has just eaten raw or undercooked fish.
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3/11. Intestinal anisakiasis mimicking intestinal obstruction.

    We report one case of acute abdomen after the ingestion of raw or undercooked fish containing nematode larvae of the genus anisakis. early diagnosis is very important as it could prevent unnecessary surgical procedures since the symptoms of intestinal anisakiasis may mimic other illnesses such as appendicitis, ileitis or peritonitis. We suggest that anisakiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute abdomen.
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4/11. CT findings of surgically verified acute invasive small bowel anisakiasis resulting in small bowel obstruction.

    Acute invasive small bowel anisakiasis is an extremely rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The authors report a case of surgically verified small bowel anisakiasis resulting in small bowel obstruction. A 54-year-old man presented with suddenly developed diffuse abdominal pain after ingestion of raw fish. The peripheral blood examination showed leukocytosis without eosinophilia. CT showed a long segment of thickened small bowel accompanied by a focal narrowed portion and combined with ascites. When these findings are noted in patients with a history of recent ingestion of raw or undercooked fish, the diagnosis of small bowel anisakiasis should be considered in order to avoid application of unnecessary surgical treatment, in spite of the severity of the abdominal pain and bowel obstruction.
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5/11. Acute abdomen due to small bowel anisakiasis.

    The popularity in Western countries of dishes based on raw fish has led to an increased incidence of anisakiasis, a human parasitic disease caused by the ingestion of live anisakid larvae. The entire digestive tract may be involved, but the stomach and the small intestine are the most frequently affected sites. We report a case of acute abdomen due to anisakis simplex infection that caused small bowel obstruction.
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6/11. anisakis simplex-induced small bowel obstruction after fish ingestion: preliminary evidence for response to parenteral corticosteroids.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Gastrointestinal anisakiasis, a fish-borne zoonoses, may be acquired by humans after the ingestion of raw marine fish infested with larvae of the nematode anisakis simplex. Because of the invasive nature of the parasite, inflammatory obstruction or perforation of the gut wall may result. Although rare, anisakis-induced intestinal obstruction is becoming a growing public health problem in Mediterranean areas, such as spain, with a high fish-intake-based diet. Unawareness of this entity and nonspecific clinical symptoms, along with the lack of alternative therapeutic options other than conservative measures, may explain why half of these patients require abdominal laparotomy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. methods: We describe a series of 8 patients with acute intestinal anisakiasis treated in our center from July 2001 to January 2004. RESULTS: The first 3 patients underwent segmental ileal resection for imminent peritonitis. The remaining 5 patients were treated with intravenous 6-methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg/24 h) for 5 days with fast clinical and radiologic resolution in all 5 patients with no adverse reactions. CONCLUSIONS: Although preliminary, our data may suggest that parenteral corticosteroids could be a reasonable, inexpensive, and safe alternative in these patients to prevent intestinal resection.
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7/11. A case of anisakiasis causing intestinal obstruction.

    A 31-year old salesman living in Seoul developed suddenly abdominal pain due to intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy exhibited segmental jejunal cellulitis caused by penetrating anisakis larva. The patient had eaten raw fish. The typical history of intestinal anisakiasis was presented with a short review of Korean patients of anisakiasis.
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8/11. Intestinal anisakiasis: a new new zealand disease.

    anisakiasis is not an uncommon disease in countries where raw fish is a delicacy. This example of intestinal obstruction following reaction to a migrating anisakis larva is the first case reported in new zealand.
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9/11. anisakiasis: nematode infestation producing small-bowel obstruction.

    A case of small-bowel obstruction occurred secondary to an uncommon parasitic disease, anisakiasis. intestinal obstruction is a rare manifestation of this disease. anisakiasis may be seen initially with nausea and vomiting or may mimic acute appendicitis or Crohn's disease. The predisposing factor in all cases is the ingestion of raw fish, and the disease is preventable by cooking fish at greater than 60 degrees C for a short time or by freezing at less than -20 degrees C for more than 24 hours. anisakiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of small-bowel obstruction in patients whose diet includes raw fish.
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10/11. Intestinal anisakiasis: first reported case in thailand.

    A case of intestinal anisakiasis is reported. The patient came with the symptoms of acute abdominal obstruction. The diagnosis was obtained by identification of the parasite in the tissue sections of the resected segment of the small intestine. This case appears to be the first reported case in thailand.
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