Cases reported "Intestinal Obstruction"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/455. intestinal obstruction after lung transplantation in children with cystic fibrosis.

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (DIOS) occurs in 15% of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The authors reviewed their experience to determine the incidence, risk factors, and natural history of adhesive intestinal obstruction and DIOS after lung transplantation. methods: Eighty-three bilateral transplants were performed in 70 CF patients between January 1990 and September 1998. All were on pancreatic enzymes preoperatively, and none had preoperative bowel preparation. Fifty-six patients (80%) had prior gastrostomy (n = 54) or jejunostomy (n = 2). Eighteen patients (25.7%) had a previous laparotomy for meconium ileus (n = 8), fundoplication (n = 4), liver transplant (n = 1), jejunal atresia (n = 1), Janeway gastrostomy takedown (n = 1), pyloromyotomy (n = 1), free air (n = 1), or appendectomy (n = 1). RESULTS: After lung transplantation, 7 patients (10%) required laparotomy for bowel obstruction (6 during the same hospitalization, and 1 during a subsequent hospitalization). The causes of obstruction were adhesions only (n = 1), DIOS only (n = 2), and a combination of DIOS and adhesions (n = 4). Adhesiolysis was performed in the 5 patients with adhesions, and a small bowel resection was also performed in 1 patient. DIOS was treated by milking secretions distally without an enterotomy (n = 3) with an enterotomy and primary closure (n = 1) or with an end ileostomy and mucus fistula (n = 2). Five had recurrent DIOS early postoperatively. One resolved with intestinal lavage, 2 were treated successfully with hypaque disimpaction, and 2 underwent reoperation; 1 required an ileostomy. The most important risk factor for posttransplant obstruction was a previous major abdominal operation. Obstruction occurred in 7 of 18 (39%) who had undergone a prior laparotomy versus 0 of 52 who had not (P < .001, chi2). CONCLUSIONS: (1) The incidence of intestinal obstruction is high after lung transplantation in children with CF. (2) Previous laparotomy is a significant risk factor. (3) Recurrent obstruction after surgery for this condition is common. (4) Preventive measures such as pretransplant bowel preparation and early postoperative bowel lavage may be beneficial in these patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/455. Laparoscopic repair of intestinal malrotation complicated by midgut volvulus.

    Intestinal malrotation is rare in older children and adults. We performed laparoscopic repair and treatment for a 13-year-old girl diagnosed as having intestinal malrotation complicated by midgut volvulus. Under laparoscopic vision, the midgut volvulus was untwisted by grasping and pulling the intestine; Ladd's band was divided and broadened; hepatic and splenic flexure of the colon was fixed; and finally an appendectomy was performed. The patient was walking and able to resume oral intake on the first postoperative day. There was no complaint in 6 months of follow-up, and the small incisional scar satisfied the patient and her parents.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/455. Case report: adenocarcinoma arising in a Crohn's stricture of the jejunum.

    patients with Crohn's disease affecting the small intestine appear to have an increased risk of developing adenocarcinoma. However, it remains an uncommon complication of an uncommon disease. The diagnosis is difficult to make both pre- and intra-operatively, and is most commonly made postoperatively on histopathology. Hence, at laparotomy, consideration should be given to performing a frozen section on all small bowel strictures due to Crohn's disease to define the presence of dysplasia or cancer. This will assist the surgeon in deciding whether to perform a stricturoplasty or a resection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/455. intestinal obstruction from midgut volvulus after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A report of an unusual complication.

    Congenital midgut malrotation, a rare anatomic anomaly that can lead to duodenal or small bowel obstruction, rarely is recognized beyond the first year of life. We report a case of unrecognized congenital midgut malrotation that resulted in midgut volvulus, causing intestinal obstruction and requiring emergent reoperation after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This unusual complication, first reported in 1994, involved a 56-year-old man and resulted in cecal infarction recognized and treated on the second postoperative day. This second case describes a less acute postoperative course, with multiple bouts of partial bowel obstruction leading to two readmissions and finally resulting in a reexploration and definitive treatment on the 19th postoperative day.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.75
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/455. Malar metastasis from rectal carcinoma: a case report.

    Facial metastasis from colorectal carcinoma is extremely rare. Only two cases have been reported in the literature. This is the first reported case of malar metastasis from colon carcinoma. The patient was a 64-year-old, white woman who underwent a low anterior resection for a nearly obstructive carcinoma at 20 cm. Her chest X-ray revealed lung metastases. Postoperatively she was treated with fluorouracil and leucovorin. Twenty months later, she presented with left facial edema, which progressively increased in size. CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium showed a large soft tissue mass centered about the left anterior zygomatic arch. The platysma muscle was displaced laterally, and the masseter muscle was involved. There was extension into the masticator space and bony involvement of the zygomatic arch. True-cut biopsy of the left cheek revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. histology was similar to that of the primary rectal adenocarcinoma. Metastasis to the malar region is extremely rare. It is a grave prognostic sign, as it is associated with advanced terminal disease. Because of the widespread metastases, only palliative treatment can be provided.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/455. Large bowel obstruction due to intrauterine device: associated pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Pelvic actinomycosis associated with the use of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) can mimic pelvic malignancy. Recognizing this rare, but not uncommon complication of IUD use can spare a patient from an extensive surgical procedure. If recognized preoperatively, a simple regimen of antibiotics can be curative; however, if symptomatic, a limited surgical procedure is warranted. We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with a slow, indolent course of partial large bowel obstruction and a history of IUD use for over 20 years. A preoperative CT scan revealed a frozen pelvis mimicking a pelvic malignancy. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a firm, indurated, fibrotic reaction in the pelvis involving the uterus, adnexa, and sigmoid colon. A diverting loop colostomy was performed, and pathology revealed sulfur granules from the extracted IUD that grew actinomyces. The patient was treated with the appropriate antibiotics, and during the takedown of the colostomy 6 months later the pelvic inflammation was completely resolved. An extensive review of the literature involving actinomycotic abscesses associated with IUD use reveals a limited number of studies reported in the general surgical literature. It behooves the general surgeon to be aware of this unusual case so that the appropriate consultation and treatment can be performed with limited morbidity to the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/455. Knot formation in a long tube used in the treatment of a post-operative adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    The complications specific to the management of the nasointestinal long tubes for small bowel obstruction are not generally appreciated. We report here of a case of knot formation of the long tube which was inserted for a 60 year-old male. Because it was difficult to place the tube in the distal stomach despite frequent changes in patient position, two coiled loops were noted at the fornix as the tip of the tube reached the antrum. The tube was gently removed without injury to the esophagus or stomach under fluoroscopic control. This case illustrates that when a long tube is used, the formation of multiple coils in the stomach should be avoided during placement to prevent knotting. Furthermore, a knotted tube can be gently removed non-operatively without esophageal injury. A short tube may be superior to a long tube because most of the complications can be avoided.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/455. hernia at 5-mm laparoscopic port site presenting as early postoperative small bowel obstruction.

    A decade has passed since laparoscopy became a popular tool in general surgery. New technologies continue to surface, and surgeons are still trying to expand the applications of this technique. Parallel to the development of new techniques, we are also measuring the presentation of new complications. Incisional hernias are not new complications. Although their avoidance has been one of the proposed benefits of laparoscopy, several cases of port-site hernias have been reported. Current surgical wisdom suggests closure of 10-mm or larger port sites to avoid herniation. Most surgeons do not routinely close 5-mm port sites, believing that such fascial defects are not large enough to create a significant risk of hernia formation, thus not justifying the extra time and effort needed to close them. Although this practice may be reasonable for most cases, it should be reconsidered in lengthy procedures, particularly if the port has been used for active operative instruments. Under these circumstances, the repetitive motions in different directions may cause the 5-mm defect to enlarge significantly, allowing a hernia of considerable size to develop, with the obvious clinical implications of such a complication. We present a case of a hernia through a 5-mm port site presenting as small-bowel obstruction in the early postoperative period after a laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/455. Pelvic actinomycosis presenting as malignant large bowel obstruction: a case report and a review of the literature.

    actinomycosis is an infrequent chronic infectious disease. In most cases the diagnosis is made postoperatively because of its unusual clinical presentation. Moreover, abdominal actinomycosis may mimic cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, or diverticulitis. Delay in diagnosis leading to inadequate management and unnecessary procedures has been reported. We report the case of a 49-year-old woman with large bowel obstruction secondary to extensive pelvic actinomycosis involving the rectosigmoid and cecum. She required emergency surgery, which involved both resection and colostomy. A review of the literature on abdominal actinomycosis during the last 50 years is also reported. Rarely has emergency surgery been described in this condition. Although the incidence of actinomycosis has decreased, the abdominal-pelvic form has been increasing over the past 10 years secondary to increased prolonged use of the intrauterine device. As the clinical spectrum of actinomycosis has dramatically changed, so have the therapeutic considerations. Aggressive surgical management in advanced cases with multiorganic involvement seems to have reemerged in recent years. Consideration of actinomycosis in a woman with prolonged use of an intrauterine device and symptoms of bowel obstruction could help to improve the preoperative diagnosis and management of this rare disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/455. The prepuce flap in the reconstruction of male anal stenosis.

    Circumferential stenosis of the male anal canal was repaired using a subcutaneous prepuce flap. The stenosis was released to create a rhomboid defect. Then, to cover the defect a rectangular flap was designed on the hairless ventral side of the penis. The flap was raised over the Buck's fascia while preserving the subcutaneous vessels in the dartos fascia, which formed the pedicle of the flap. The flap was transposed to the defect by passing it through a tunnel in the perineum. The postoperative course was uneventful and the result was good. The flap had reliable vascularity, was very thin, and pliable so that it could adapt to the rhomboid defect in the anal canal.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Intestinal Obstruction'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.