Cases reported "Intracranial Aneurysm"

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11/26. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Intracranial aneurysms occur in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) approximately five times more often than in the general population, and in the same patient group, subarachnoid hemorrhage from rupture of aneurysms occurs about a decade earlier than in the general population. We present a case of unsuspected ADPKD presenting as spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured intracranial aneurysm.
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keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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12/26. The association between polycystic kidney disease and cerebral aneurysms.

    rupture of cerebral aneurysms is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with adult polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In the present paper, we review the literature regarding the association of cerebral aneurysms and PKD and emphasize, by means of a case report, the importance of familial clustering of aneurysms in patients with PKD. We conclude that the prevalence of intracranial aneurysms in patients with PKD approaches 40% and is likely significantly higher in patients with PKD and a positive family history for cerebral aneurysm. We recommend that screening cerebral angiography be strongly considered in all patients with PKD and a family history of cerebral aneurysm or subarachnoid hemorrhage.
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ranking = 1
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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13/26. Polycystic kidney of autosomal dominant inheritance, polycystic liver and congenital hepatic fibrosis in a single kindred.

    A family with clear evidence of concomitant congenital hepatic fibrosis, polycystic liver and adult-type polycystic kidney is reported. The autosomal dominant inheritance of polycystic kidney in association with either liver cyst or hepatic fibrosis in this family suggests that various combinations of hepatic and renal fibrocystic lesions are possible to occur. Additionally, in the proband a very rare association of congenital hepatic fibrosis and cerebral aneurysm was present.
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ranking = 0.00332337469701
keywords = kidney
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14/26. Congenital hepatic fibrosis and cerebral aneurysm in a 32-year-old woman.

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis has been associated with a number of visceral abnormalities, but only rarely with cerebral aneurysms. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman with congenital hepatic fibrosis and a subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. A review of the literature reveals only two previous reports of such an association and both were also associated with polycystic kidney disease. Our patient is unique in that she does not have polycystic kidney disease but rather medullary sponge kidney.
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ranking = 0.40055389578283
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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15/26. Alzheimer's disease in a patient on long-term hemodialysis: a case report.

    This case report describes a progressive dementia in a 49-year-old black male on long-term hemodialysis. The initial presentation simulated depression. The dementia persisted after an unsuccessful cadaver homograft transplant. The character of the dementia was nonspecific but typical features of dialysis dementia were lacking. autopsy revealed a ruptured cerebral aneurysm, polycystic kidneys, moderately severe atherosclerosis, miliary tuberculosis, and neurofibrillary degeneration of the hippocampus. The significance of a possible relationship between end-stage renal disease (ESRD), hemodialysis, and Alzheimer's disease in this case is discussed.
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ranking = 0.00055389578283499
keywords = kidney
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16/26. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery, cavum septi pellucidi, and associated cerebral aneurysm in a patient with polycystic kidney disease: case report.

    A 51-year-old man with polycystic kidney disease had a persistent primitive trigeminal artery, cavum septi pellucidi, and an unruptured cerebral aneurysm. He had a history of long-standing hypertension, but not of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Computed tomograms revealed cavum septi pellucidi. Because of the polycystic kidney disease, we performed four-vessel cerebral angiography, which revealed a persistent primitive trigeminal artery and a cerebral aneurysm at the bifurcation of the left internal carotid artery. The neck of the aneurysm was clipped successfully without producing any neurological deficit. The clinical significance of the combination of these multiple anomalies and cerebral aneurysms is discussed.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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17/26. association of persistent hypoglossal artery, multiple intracranial aneurysms, and polycystic disease.

    A case of multiple intracranial aneurysms associated with a persistent hypoglossal artery and polycystic disease of the liver and kidneys is reported. The persistent hypoglossal artery was seen on the right side, and the left vertebral artery was hypoplastic. There were three aneurysms, each of which was located on bifurcations of right and left middle cerebral artery, and basilar artery. They were successfully treated by direct approach.
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ranking = 0.00055389578283499
keywords = kidney
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18/26. Familial intracranial aneurysms, with two occurring at the distal anterior cerebral artery.

    Familial aneurysms of the distal anterior cerebral artery are a neurosurgical rarity. We report a family with four of its members (a mother and three sons) suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured aneurysms, two of them being of the distal anterior cerebral artery. There was no evidence of endocarditis, septic emboli, coarctation of the aorta, or trauma. There was no family history of Marfan's syndrome, polycystic kidney, or hereditary connective tissue disorder. We believe that there has been no report in the neurosurgical literature of familial cases of distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysms.
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ranking = 0.00055389578283499
keywords = kidney
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19/26. Familial intracranial aneurysms: report of four families.

    The authors describe eight cases of familial intracranial aneurysms occurring in four families. In the literature reviewed, familial aneurysms have different characteristics in that the incidence of the anterior communicating aneurysms is lower and that of the middle cerebral aneurysms is somewhat higher, and the age of patients at diagnosis is often younger. Although the number of patients is few, our study does not support these characteristics. A family history of intracranial aneurysms should include such high-risk factors as polycystic kidneys, coarctation of the aorta, fibromuscular dysplasia, and other connective tissue disorders.
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ranking = 0.00055389578283499
keywords = kidney
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20/26. Intracranial dissecting and saccular aneurysms in polycystic kidney disease.

    A young man with polycystic kidney disease was seen initially with an brain-stem infarction. Postmortem examination disclosed a dissecting aneurysm of the basilar artery and a saccular aneurysm of the right vertebral artery. Dissecting intracranial aneurysms rarely are associated with saccular aneurysms and, to our knowledge, have not been reported in association with polycystic kidney disease.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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