Cases reported "Intracranial Aneurysm"

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1/25. De novo formation of familial cerebral aneurysms: case report.

    OBJECTIVES: The factors regulating the formation and growth of cerebral aneurysms are poorly understood. We report the case of a patient whose grandfather had a cerebral aneurysm and who developed numerous de novo aneurysms of varying size 9 years after the treatment of a first aneurysm. This observation sheds light on the cause and growth of cerebral aneurysms in familial cases that may be pertinent to sporadic cases. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 58-year-old man was admitted to the Montreal Neurological Institute in 1956 for an ultimately fatal, autopsy-proven, ruptured internal carotid artery aneurysm. His granddaughter was first admitted to the same institution in 1984 after suffering a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured right terminal internal carotid artery aneurysm that was successfully treated. Four-vessel cerebral angiography did not reveal other aneurysms. The granddaughter was readmitted to the hospital 9 years later after a new, lumbar puncture-proven subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred. cerebral angiography demonstrated that the previously clipped aneurysm did not fill. However, five new aneurysms were present. INTERVENTION: An anterior communicating artery aneurysm, thought to be the one that bled, was surgically clipped, and a large right posterior communicating artery aneurysm was coiled endovascularly. The remaining, smaller aneurysms were left untreated. CONCLUSION: The appearance of five new aneurysms during a 9-year interval suggests that there may be a genetic factor operating in the development of cerebral aneurysms in families and that this may produce a more widespread cerebral arteriopathy than is generally appreciated. patients with treated cerebral aneurysms from families in which two or more individuals have cerebral aneurysms, and perhaps their first and second degree relatives who have had negative angiograms, should be considered for periodic follow-up cerebrovascular imaging to rule out the subsequent development of de novo aneurysms.
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2/25. Traumatic aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery as a complication of pin-type head-holder device. Case report.

    BACKGROUND: Despite the widespread use of pin head-holder devices in neurosurgical procedures, associated complications are relatively infrequent and usually minor. Inadvertent puncture of a major scalp vessel is one of these complications. Usually it is not problematic but the injured vessel may develop a traumatic aneurysm with subsequent rupture. CASE DESCRIPTION: We report the case of a 51-year-old man who underwent a left pterional craniotomy for intracranial aneurysm surgery. The head was fixed with the Sugita pin head-holder. Three weeks after discharge, the patient returned to the hospital after an enlarging and pulsatile mass in his left temporal region in one of the pin puncture wounds ruptured and bled. The angiogram revealed a traumatic aneurysm of the superficial temporal artery, which was ligated and excised. CONCLUSION: The Sugita multipurpose head frame is one of the head-holders most frequently used in neurosurgical procedures. It provides some advantages over other pin head-holders, but its sharp point pins in addition to a rotational fixing mechanism instead of simple pressure might increase the risk of scalp vessel injury. A traumatic aneurysm should be suspected when a pulsating scalp mass develops in a patient who has recently undergone a surgical procedure with his head fixed in a pin head-holder device. physicians must be aware of this possibility when considering the diagnosis of a temporal mass to avoid unexpected hemorrhage at the time of surgery.
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3/25. Acute intracranial hemorrhage caused by acupuncture.

    A 44-year-old Chinese man developed severe occipital headache, nausea, and vomiting during acupuncture treatment of the posterior neck for chronic neck pain. Computed tomography of the head showed hemorrhage in the fourth, third, and lateral ventricles. A lumbar puncture confirmed the presence of blood. magnetic resonance angiography with gadolinium did not reveal any saccular aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations. The patient's headache resolved over a period of 28 days without any neurological deficits. acupuncture of the posterior neck can cause acute intracranial hemorrhage.
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4/25. A giant internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm presenting with atypical trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve palsy in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: In cases of internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (IC-PC) aneurysm, involvement of the trigeminal nerve at its root is rare, and facial nerve palsy is even more unusual. CASE REPORT: A large, unruptured IC-PC aneurysm was detected in a 56-year-old man with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), but surgery was not performed because of mild renal dysfunction. Two months later, a sudden, severe headache suggested a subarachnoid hemorrhage, which was ruled out by computed tomography and lumbar puncture. Neurological examination revealed complete oculomotor palsy, atypical trigeminal neuralgia, and facial palsy with gustatory disturbance. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a partially thrombosed giant aneurysm that directly compressed the trigeminal nerve root, reached the internal auditory canal, and was adjacent to the facial nerve. The neck of the aneurysm was successfully clipped via a subtemporal transtentorial approach. The postoperative course was uneventful, and all neurological symptoms had resolved within 3 months. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that the prosopalgia in this case was atypical trigeminal neuralgia due to direct compression of the trigeminal nerve root by the aneurysmal sac. A contributory cause was stretching of the oculomotor nerve, which contains sensory afferent inhibitory fibers derived from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve. The facial palsy was of peripheral type and was accompanied by gustatory disturbance. This is the first reported case of facial palsy caused by an IC-PC aneurysm and also a very rare case of an IC-PC aneurysm clipped by a subtemporal transtentorial approach.
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5/25. Transvascular coil hooking procedure to retrieve an unraveled Guglielmi detachable coil: technical note.

    OBJECTIVE: A patient with an anterior communicating artery aneurysm was treated by use of endovascular coiling, and a Guglielmi detachable coil (boston Scientific/Target, Fremont, CA) fractured distal to its connection to the delivering catheter. The unraveled coil floated out from the aneurysm to extend into the bifurcation of the left middle cerebral artery. We describe the microsurgical procedure used to retrieve the coil after an endovascular approach failed. methods: The left anterior cerebral artery was punctured just below the aneurysm neck, and a titanium microhook was introduced to anchor the coil and pull it out. Slight traction was exerted before sectioning the coil to avoid protrusion of the stump into the parent vessel. RESULTS: The unraveled coil was removed in totality without permanent morbidity. CONCLUSION: This report describes the case of a rare complication of coil embolization treated with a minimal transarterial coil hooking procedure.
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6/25. Complete penetration of the optic chiasm by an unruptured aneurysm of the ophthalmic segment: case report.

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that aneurysms of the ophthalmic segment sometimes elevate the optic nerve or chiasm, and in case of large or giant aneurysms, the optic apparatus can be dramatically thinned. Nonetheless, they rarely penetrate the optic pathway completely. To our knowledge, no previous reports have dealt with the complete penetration of the optic chiasm by unruptured aneurysms of the ophthalmic segment. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 70-year-old woman presented with visual dysfunction in her left eye that she had experienced for several months. Her left visual acuity had rapidly deteriorated to the level of finger counting and visual field testing demonstrated nasal hemianopsia in the left eye and upper temporal quadrant hemianopsia in the right eye. Left internal carotid angiograms and three-dimensional digital subtraction angiograms showed an aneurysm of the ophthalmic segment projecting superomedially. Intraoperative findings revealed complete penetration of the optic chiasm by the fundus of the aneurysm. The optic pathway adjacent to the dome had become remarkably thin and dark yellow. After clipping was completed, the fundus of the aneurysm was punctured to decompress the optic chiasm. Postoperatively, patient's visual acuity in the left eye gradually recovered, but the visual field deficit persisted after the operation. CONCLUSION: This rare case demonstrates the potentially aggressive behavior of unruptured aneurysms of the ophthalmic segment. patients with unruptured aneurysms of the ophthalmic segment who present with visual symptoms should be treated with surgical clipping to decompress the optic pathway as soon as possible.
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7/25. Hemostatic closure device after carotid puncture for stent and coil placement in an intracranial aneurysm: technical note.

    A 71-year-old female patient presented with a wide-necked carotid cavernous aneurysm for which stent and coil placement was planned. Arterial tortuosity required direct puncture of the common carotid artery for access. The procedure was performed while the patient was receiving antiplatelet and anticoagulative therapy. To avoid potentially hazardous and prolonged carotid compression, a closure device (Angio-Seal) was used at the end of the procedure. The postoperative period was clinically uneventful. Sonographic and angiographic follow-up of the carotid artery were performed.
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8/25. Progression of a posterior communicating artery infundibulum into an aneurysm in a patient with alagille syndrome. Case report.

    The authors present a case in which a posterior communicating artery (PCoA) infundibulum progressed into an aneurysm in a patient with alagille syndrome (arteriohepatic dysplasia). The 3-mm PCoA infundibulum had been noted on angiography studies obtained 5 years earlier, prior to clip occlusion of a basilar tip aneurysm. Recently, the patient presented to the emergency department with the sudden onset of headache and decreased mental status. A computerized tomography scan of the head with three-dimensional angiography revealed no gross subarachnoid hemorrhage, but did demonstrate a 5-mm PCoA aneurysm. Lumbar puncture demonstrated xanthochromia and a large quantity of red blood cells. The patient underwent open surgery for aneurysm clip occlusion and obtained a good recovery. This case illustrates the small but growing number of examples of infundibulum progression. It also indicates the need for a close follow up in patients with congenital abnormalities that may pose an increased risk for what has traditionally been considered a benign lesion.
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9/25. Double microcatheter technique for endovascular coiling of wide-neck aneurysms using a new guiding device for the transcarotid approach: technical note.

    In the endovascular treatment of cerebrovascular diseases, positioning the guiding catheter is of great importance. In cases where vessel tortuosity prohibits positioning the guiding catheter in the carotid artery via the femoral approach, we use a direct carotid approach via common carotid artery puncture. For direct puncture of the common carotid artery we devised a 6-Fr sheath with double insertion points. This new device facilitates the use of double microcatheters and provides safe and effective vascular access.
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10/25. Direct access to the carotid circulation by cut down for endovascular neuro-interventions.

    BACKGROUND: Not all vascular lesions of the brain that are amenable to endovascular treatment are safely accessible via the transfemoral route. We describe our technique of carotid cut down for endovascular access and present a couple of illustrative cases. The increasing number of neurosurgeons performing endovascular procedures, or collaborating with interventional neuroradiologists, suggests that this technique should be revived. methods: Through a small transverse neck incision at the level of the thyroid cartilage, the CCA, ICA, and external carotid artery are exposed. After obtaining vascular control with vessel loupes, a purse-string suture is placed in the CCA. Puncture of the artery in the center of the purse string is followed by navigation of a wire, and then a sheath, into the ICA. The neurointervention is then carried out. At the conclusion of the procedure, the sheath is removed from the CCA and the purse string tied to secure the artery. RESULTS: This technique has allowed us to successfully access the intracranial circulation in 6 patients with challenging anatomy. We present here 2 of the original cases leading to our increasing use of this technique. CONCLUSION: Carotid cut down for direct puncture of the CCA is a viable option to gain access to the intracranial circulation when the transfemoral route seems difficult or dangerous.
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