Cases reported "Intracranial Hypertension"

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1/28. Endovascular recanalization with balloon angioplasty and stenting of an occluded occipital sinus for treatment of intracranial venous hypertension: technical case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Dural sinus thrombosis can lead to intracranial venous hypertension and can be complicated by intracranial hemorrhage. We present a case report of a patient who underwent endovascular recanalization and stenting of a thrombosed occipital sinus. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 13-year-old patient with a history of chronic sinus thrombosis refractory to anticoagulant therapy presented with acute onset of aphasia and hemiparesis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hydrocephalus and cerebral edema. Angiography delineated multiple dural arteriovenous fistulae and persistent occlusion of the posterior sagittal, occipital, and bilateral transverse dural sinuses with retrograde cortical venous drainage. INTERVENTION: After embolization of the dural arteriovenous fistulae, a transvenous approach was used to recanalize and perform balloon angioplasty of the right internal jugular vein and the occipital and left transverse sinuses, resulting in subsequent clinical improvement. The patient's condition deteriorated 3 days later with reocclusion of both balloon-dilated sinuses. Repeat angioplasty and then deployment of an endovascular stent in the occipital sinus were performed, and reestablishment of venous outflow was achieved, resulting in a decrease of intracranial venous pressure from 41 to 14 mm Hg and neurological improvement. At the 3-month follow-up examination, the stented occipital sinus remained patent and served as the only conduit for extracranial venous outflow; the patient remained neurologically intact at the 12-month follow-up examination. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of mechanical recanalization, balloon angioplasty, and stent deployment in the occipital sinus to provide sustained venous outflow for the treatment of venous hypertension with retrograde cortical venous drainage in a patient with dural pansinus thrombosis refractory to anticoagulant therapy.
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keywords = thrombosis, vein
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2/28. Acquired dural fistulae in benign intracranial hypertension: a short case report.

    Venous sinus thrombosis has been regarded as a known cause of intracranial hypertension. We report a case of long-standing raised intracranial hypertension (ICT) that presented with deteriorating vision in both eyes. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain and cerebral angiography showed blockage of superior saggital sinus and sigmoid sinuses with bilateral dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVF) formation.
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ranking = 0.33287632455104
keywords = thrombosis
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3/28. Extensive radiculopathy: a manifestation of intracranial hypertension.

    We report two patients with severe radiculopathy due to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) resulting from idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IHH) in one, and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) in the other. Our aim is to document this unique association, which escaped diagnosis in both patients.
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ranking = 0.33287632455104
keywords = thrombosis
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4/28. Pineal cavernous angioma presenting with Parkinsonism.

    Cavernous angioma of the pineal region is rare, as is brain tumour coincident with Parkinsonism. The authors describe the case of a 55 year old woman with a pineal region cavernous angioma, who subsequently developed Parkinsonism after her increased intracranial pressure was relieved. The cause of Parkinsonian syndrome is unclear, but compression of the posterior thalamus and upper mid-brain with congestion of the deep venous system may have caused vascular disturbance of the nigro-striate-pallidal system. Her symptoms gradually improved after total excision of the lesion.
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ranking = 0.00014814679544698
keywords = deep
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5/28. A huge frontal meningioma associated with intraoperative massive bleeding and severe brain swelling--case report.

    A 58 year old female presented with progressive memory disturbance and personality change. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging disclosed a huge mass lesion accompanied by prominent oedema in the right frontal lobe. Cerebral angiogram demonstrated a vascular-rich tumour and a major drainer through diploic vein. A right frontotemporal craniotomy was performed. We encountered massive bleeding from diploic vein and dura mater immediately at the craniotomy. We were also faced with severe brain swelling at the dural incision. The tumour was solid, highly vascularised, and fairly well demarcated. We performed total removal of the tumour as quickly as possible in order to reduce the intracranial hypertension and avoid the impending brain herniation. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was asymptomatic at 10 months follow-up.
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ranking = 0.0027420526937846
keywords = vein
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6/28. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis presenting as intracranial hypertension.

    Benign intracranial hypertension is known to be associated with obesity, endocrine abnormalities, various medications, and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. We report a patient presenting with headaches and vomiting attributed to benign intracranial hypertension. The diagnostic work-up revealed Langerhans' cell histiocytosis of the occipital bone. There was no evidence for cerebral vein thrombosis by cranial computed tomography scan, Doppler ultrasonography, planar and single photon emission computed tomography technetium 99m-labelled red blood cell scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance angiography. Excision of the occipital bone lesion and a short course of acetazolamide and prednisone were curative. We hypothesize that cytokines secreted by the tumor were responsible for the development of intracranial hypertension.
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ranking = 0.66712367544896
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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7/28. Congestive brain oedema associated with a pial arteriovenous malformation with impaired venous drainage.

    We describe two patients with an unruptured pial AVM accompanied by significant brain oedema at initial presentation. In both cases, the primary drainer was a cortical vein showing varicose dilatation. in which venous congestion was indicated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The restriction of venous drainage presumably caused venous hypertension in the surrounding brain, leading to the brain oedema and neurological symptoms. brain oedema can develop in patients with an unruptured AVM by venous congestion following spontaneous thrombosis of venous components. Varicosity in a major cortical draining vein and a small nidus are the possible lesions predisposing this fairly rare condition for unruptured AVMs.
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ranking = 0.33561837724482
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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8/28. Dural arteriovenous malformation associated with recurrent subdural haematoma and intracranial hypertension.

    An unusual case of intracranial hypertension and symptoms of a left parieto-occipital mass lesion due to a dural arteriovenous malformation (AVM) with a large and dilated draining vein is reported. The patient also had a history of homolateral recurrent subdural haematoma, 11 years before. Subdural haematoma is rarely associated to a dural AVM. We suggest that the recurrent subdural haematoma was due to the very slow and intermittent venous bleeding from the preexisting dural malformation, which progressively enlarged in the following years to become very large. The symptoms of intracranial hypertension and papilloedema may be explained by the increased pressure in the dural sinus and the cerebral venous system. On the other hand, focal neurological symptoms in our case resulted from the mass effect due to an aneurysmally dilated draining vein in the left parieto-occipital region.
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ranking = 0.0027420526937846
keywords = vein
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9/28. Cerebral vein thrombosis in Behcet's disease.

    Behcet's disease is a chronic, relapsing multisystem disorder, and nervous system involvement is one of the serious manifestations. Neuro-Behcet is rarely reported in children and may present with a wide variety of symptoms because the entire neuraxis may be affected. A case of cerebral vein thrombosis secondary to Behcet's disease is presented. The patient has recovered without any visual loss and had no complaints at 1-year follow-up.
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ranking = 1.6712367544896
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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10/28. intracranial hypertension in Sturge-Weber/Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber overlap syndrome due to impairment of cerebral venous outflow.

    klippel-trenaunay-weber syndrome (KTWS) is a rare mesodermal phakomatosis characterized by (1) cutaneous haemangiomata (usually unilateral and involving an extremity) (2) venous varicosities and (3) osseous and soft tissue hypertrophy, also of the affected limb. sturge-weber syndrome (SWS), also a mesodermal phakamatosis, is characterized by meningofacial angiomatosis with cerebral calcification. Overlap between KTWS and SWS is recognized. We describe the case of a young woman with features of both KTWS and SWS who presented with symptoms of acute intracranial hypertension, including headache, vomiting and marked visual impairment. cerebral angiography revealed paucity of the superficial cortical veins overlying one of the cerebral hemispheres and centripetal venous drainage via small deep venous channels. Based upon this pattern of cerebral venous outflow, we postulate a mechanism to explain the acute episode of intracranial hypertension.
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ranking = 0.0015191731423393
keywords = vein, deep
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