Cases reported "Intracranial Thrombosis"

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1/116. Cerebral vein thrombosis in a case with thromboangiitis obliterans.

    thromboangiitis obliterans is a chronic inflammatory vessel disease that involves predominantly the small and medium-sized arteries and veins of the distal extremities. Appearance and cessation of symptoms are closely related to patterns of tobacco consumption. That cerebral arteries can also be involved is shown by reports of rare cases in which cerebral artery occlusion led to infarction. We report on a 28-year-old man with thromboangiitis obliterans who developed extensive cerebral vein thrombosis after a single episode of cigarette smoking following several years of nonsmoking. Despite extensive evaluation, no other known cause or predisposition of cerebral vein thrombosis could be found. This case suggests that cerebral veins can be involved in thromboangiitis obliterans and patients with thromboangiitis obliterans might be at risk for cerebral vein thrombosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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2/116. Cerebral thrombophlebitis in three patients with probable multiple sclerosis. role of lumbar puncture or intravenous corticosteroid treatment.

    We report 3 cases of young patients, 2 women and 1 man, who presented a cerebral venous thrombosis following intravenous treatment with high doses of corticosteroids. All of them presented a probable multiple sclerosis according to clinical, biological (CSF) and MRI criteria and were treated for the first time by a bolus of 1,000 mg of methylprednisolone OD during 5 days. All the usual causes of cerebral venous thrombosis were systematically excluded in all of them. The role of corticosteroid treatment in cerebral thrombophlebitis is discussed. All of them underwent a lumbar puncture a few days before corticosteroid treatment and the relationship between lumbar puncture and cerebral thrombophlebitis is also discussed. Cerebral venous thrombosis associated with corticosteroid treatment has rarely been reported. The relationship between corticosteroids and venous thrombosis has already been suggested but has never been clearly understood.
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ranking = 0.63660648124042
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
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3/116. Emergent decompressive craniectomy in patients with fixed dilated pupils due to cerebral venous and dural sinus thrombosis: report of three cases.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Cerebral venous and dural sinus thrombosis is a rare cause of stroke. Although morbidity and mortality have greatly decreased in recent years as a result of early diagnosis and timely medical treatment, when coma occurs the prognosis remains poor. We evaluated whether emergent decompressive craniectomy has a role in the treatment of patients with brain herniation from dural sinus thrombosis and hemorrhagic infarct. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Three patients developed large hemorrhagic infarct with coma and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils resulting from aseptic dural sinus thrombosis. INTERVENTION: Two patients underwent emergent surgical decompression as soon as brain herniation developed, and these patients had complete functional recovery. One underwent delayed surgical decompression and remained severely disabled. CONCLUSION: Our results provide preliminary evidence that emergent decompressive craniectomy is effective in patients with brain herniation from dural sinus thrombosis, provided that the clinical onset is recent. We therefore recommend consideration of this aggressive surgical technique for such patients, who may survive with good outcomes.
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ranking = 1.1403307853375
keywords = thrombosis
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4/116. Acquired pial arteriovenous fistula following cerebral vein thrombosis.

    BACKGROUND: We report a unique case of an acquired pial arteriovenous fistula occurring after an asymptomatic thrombosis of a superficial cerebral vein. CASE DESCRIPTION: A cerebral angiogram performed in a 51-year-old man with subarachnoid hemorrhage revealed a 10-mm ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and a thrombosed left superficial middle cerebral vein. Coil embolization of the anterior communicating aneurysm was performed. Follow-up angiography 18 months later revealed a new, asymptomatic, pial arteriovenous fistula between the previously thrombosed left superficial middle cerebral vein and a small sylvian branch of the left middle cerebral artery. CONCLUSIONS: This case provides evidence that pial arteriovenous fistulas may develop as acquired lesions and furthermore may rarely follow cerebral vein thrombosis. Several cases of dural arteriovenous fistulas, as well as a single case of a mixed pial-dural arteriovenous fistula, occurring after dural sinus thrombosis have been reported previously. However, to our knowledge, this is the first report of an acquired pial arteriovenous fistula following a cerebral vein thrombosis.
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ranking = 1.142256022897
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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5/116. coccidioidomycosis meningitis with massive dural and cerebral venous thrombosis and tissue arthroconidia.

    To our knowledge we report the first case of meningitis from coccidioides immitis associated with massive dural and cerebral venous thrombosis and with mycelial forms of the organism in brain tissue. The patient was a 43-year-old man with late-stage acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) whose premortem and postmortem cultures confirmed C immitis as the only central nervous system pathogenic organism. death was attributable to multiple hemorrhagic venous infarctions with cerebral edema and herniation. Although phlebitis has been noted parenthetically to occur in C immitis meningitis in the past, it has been overshadowed by the arteritic complications of the disease. This patient's severe C immitis ventriculitis with adjacent venulitis appeared to be the cause of the widespread venous thrombosis. AIDS-related coagulation defects may have contributed to his thrombotic tendency.
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ranking = 0.95490972186062
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
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6/116. basilar artery endoprosthesis placement: rescue therapy for recurrent thrombosis.

    Hyperacute thrombosis of the basilar artery accompanied urgent treatment of basilar thrombosis with local thrombolytics and arterial reconstruction by balloon angioplasty. Successful placement of an endoprosthesis into the basilar artery permitted sustained restoration of blood flow. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first successful report of intracranial endoprosthesis deployment.
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ranking = 0.85524808900312
keywords = thrombosis
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7/116. Cerebral deep venous thrombosis presenting as acute micrographia and hypophonia.

    Deep cerebral venous thrombosis is often a devastating condition associated with hemorrhagic infarction. We describe a patient who presented with acute micrographia and hypophonia as the sole manifestations of extensive deep venous sinus thrombosis.
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ranking = 0.93832412061418
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis, deep
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8/116. Cerebral artery thrombosis as a cause of striatocapsular infarction. a histopathological case study.

    Striatocapsular infarction is a distinct form of stroke, but few histopathological studies have been performed concerning acute lesions. We report the postmortem findings of a patient with an infarct who died shortly after onset. A 72-year-old man died of acute myocardial infarction 6 days after the onset of left-sided striatocapsular infarction. autopsy revealed thrombus formation of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) trunk. The lateral striate arteries irrigating the area of the infarct branched off distal to the arterial segment occluded with a thrombus. The cortical vessels were perfused by leptomeningeal collaterals. This report histopathologically confirmed thrombus formation of the MCA resulting in striatocapsular infarction.
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ranking = 0.57016539266875
keywords = thrombosis
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9/116. A phase Ib/II trial of granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2 for renal cell carcinoma patients with pulmonary metastases: a case of fatal central nervous system thrombosis.

    BACKGROUND: interleukin-2 (IL-2) and granulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are cytokines with nonoverlapping pleiotropic effects. In a prior Phase Ib study, this combination of agents exhibited antitumor effects in the lungs of four of eight patients with renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary metastases. We conducted this Phase Ib/II trial to determine the response rate of renal cell carcinoma patients with pulmonary metastases treated with continuous infusion IL-2 plus GM-CSF. methods: patients with renal cell carcinoma and pulmonary metastases were treated with 1.5, 2.25, or 4.5 x 10(6) IU/m(2)/day 96-hour continuous infusion IL-2 on Days 1-4, 8-11, and 15-18, and 1.25, 2.25, or 2.5 microg/kg/day GM-CSF on Days 8-19. RESULTS: Sixteen patients were treated per protocol, 14 of whom could be evaluated for disease progression. None of these 14 patients had >50% shrinkage of either total tumor burden or pulmonary metastasis. One patient developed Grade 5 neurotoxicity. autopsy revealed acute multifocal cerebral venous thrombosis as well as acute subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of IL-2 and GM-CSF may be associated with marked morbidity and, as in one case in this study, mortality. No significant antitumor activity was appreciated. Thus, the combination of IL-2 and GM-CSF, when administered at this dose and according to this schedule, does not appear to be active in renal cell carcinoma and is associated with significant toxicities. Further studies using this combination of agents should only be undertaken with extreme caution and particular attention to neurotoxicity.
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ranking = 0.72931701297885
keywords = thrombosis, venous thrombosis
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10/116. Cerebral venous infarction following thrombosis of the draining vein of a venous angioma (developmental abnormality).

    We report two cases of cerebral venous angioma presenting as venous infarction, one in the left parietal lobe, the other in the left frontal lobe. Cerebral imaging demonstrated thrombotic occlusion of the draining vein of the venous angioma associated in the latter case with thrombosis of the anterior part of the superior longitudinal sinus. Both patients were free of coagulopathy. They were treated with anticoagulant therapy. One completely recovered, while the other was left with slight residual disability. Thrombosis of the draining vein has been reported in only 6 previous cases, of whom only 2 received anticoagulant therapy. Discovery of a venous angioma in the diagnostic workup of a patient with recent neurological disorders should raise the question of a possible occlusion of the draining vein and lead to an appropriate therapy.
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ranking = 0.71287262989886
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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