Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/6. staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis following strabismus surgery.

    Inadvertent perforation of the sclera is a well-known complication of strabismus surgery. Scleral perforation may lead to retinal detachment, intraocular hemorrhage, cataract, hyphema, glaucoma, endophthalmitis, and phthisis bulbi. However, endophthalmitis following strabismus surgery is extremely rare, with an estimated incidence of 1:3500 to 1:185,000. We describe a case of Staphylococcus epidermidis endophthalmitis in an adult following strabismus surgery treated successfully with intravitreal antibiotics and corticosteroids.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/6. hyphema occurring during selective laser trabeculoplasty.

    The first case of hyphema occurring during selective laser trabeculoplasty in an eye without neovascularization is described. A 77-year-old man with uncontrolled open-angle glaucoma received selective laser trabeculoplasty in both eyes for high intraocular pressure with maximally tolerated medical treatment. hyphema occurred during selective laser trabeculoplasty in the left eye. This resolved spontaneously without sequelae. Successful intraocular pressure control was achieved. hyphema and bleeding can happen during selective laser trabeculoplasty. Although this was transient and uneventful in one patient, careful monitoring of intraocular pressure and anterior chamber reaction is advised.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/6. The role of vitrectomy instrumentation in the treatment of severe traumatic hyphema.

    Eight patients with severe traumatic hyphemas underwent clot evacuation with vitrectomy instrumentation. The patients were followed up for periods of one to four years. No significant intraoperative complications were noted, but one eye developed a postoperative flat anterior chamber and another developed multiple staphylomas with uncontrolled glaucoma, leading to the eventual enucleation. Seven of the eight operated eyes achieved intraocular pressure control in the early postoperative period, and this control was sustained throughout the course of follow-up without antiglaucomatous medication. These same seven eyes had final visual acuities of 6/12 (20/40) or better.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/6. Complications while removing the IOLAB 91Z lens for the UGH-UGH syndrome.

    Five patients having UGH syndrome (uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema plus vitreous hemorrhage) with the IOLAB 91Z intraocular lens (IOL) requiring removal are reported. Preoperative gonioscopy showed the polypropylene loops to be enmeshed in synechias. In four cases the IOL was difficult to remove and two cases had significant intraoperative complications. In one case we used the Nd:YAG laser to cut the synechias preoperatively and effected an easy removal.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/6. The treatment of postoperative hyphema by cyclodiathermy.

    Penetrating cyclodiathermy, a technique first used for glaucoma, is presented as a means of controlling continuous, intermittent, or recurrent postoperative hyphema. A case is reported in which cyclodiathermy was successfully used to stop recurrent hemorrhage following cataract surgery. Details of the procedure are described. Causes of postoperative hyphema are discussed, and the advantages of penetrating cyclodiathermy over other forms of treatment are considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/6. hyphema after peribulbar anesthesia for cataract surgery in Fuchs' heterochromic iridocyclitis.

    PURPOSE: To describe an unusual ocular sign in one patient with Fuchs' heterochromic iridocyclitis at cataract surgery. methods: We describe a patient with Fuchs' heterochromic iridocyclitis and cataract who developed a 1 mm hyphema observed two minutes after peribulbar anesthesia for cataract surgery. RESULTS: The patient was found to have an equivalent of the Amsler-Verrey sign. It appeared after peribulbar anesthesia and before any instrument touched the globe. It did not interfere with surgery and disappeared completely by day 2. CONCLUSION: The appearance of a hyphema after peribulbar anesthesia in Fuchs' heterochromic iridocyclitis is an unusual sign that may have the same pathophysiology as the Amsler-Verrey sign.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = hyphema
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Intraoperative Complications'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.