Cases reported "Iris Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/43. Long-term outcome of aqueous shunt surgery in ten patients with iridocorneal endothelial syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To report the long-term outcome of ten patients with iridocorneal endothelial (ice) syndrome who underwent aqueous shunt surgery for uncontrolled glaucoma. DESIGN: Noncomparative, retrospective case series. PARTICIPANTS: The authors reviewed charts of ten patients with ice syndrome-related glaucoma who underwent aqueous shunt surgery at one institution between 1987 and 1996. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: intraocular pressure (IOP), number of glaucoma medications, and further surgical interventions were measured. RESULTS: With a median follow-up of 55 months, four eyes had adequate IOP control (IOP <21 mm Hg) with one or two medications after the initial aqueous shunt surgery. An additional three eyes achieved adequate IOP control after one or more tube repositionings or revisions of the initial aqueous shunt. In this series, the aqueous shunt surgery most often failed because of blocking of the tube ostium by iris, ice membrane, or membrane-induced tube migration. CONCLUSION: Aqueous shunt surgery appears to be an effective method for IOP lowering in some eyes with ice syndrome-related glaucoma when medical treatment or conventional filtration surgeries fail, but additional glaucoma procedures and/or aqueous shunt revisions and tube repositionings are not uncommon.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/43. Histopathological findings of X-linked retinoschisis with neovascular glaucoma.

    BACKGROUND: X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is rarely complicated by neovascular glaucoma. Only a few reports of XLRS histopathological findings with neovascular glaucoma have been published. methods: A 41-year-old man with XLRS complicated by neovascular glaucoma in his left eye was examined with electroretinography, B-scan, ultrasound biomicroscopy and computed tomography. He was examined by ophthalmoscopy and fluorescein angiography in the other eye. An enucleation was performed in his left eye due to uncontrollable high intraocular pressure and persistent ocular pain. We examined the enucleated eye histopathologically. RESULTS: Examination of the enucleated eye showed nuclear sclerosis of the lens, pigmented retrolental membrane and retinoschisis which separated the inner layer of the retina and made a large space in the vitreous cavity without any apparent detachment of the outer layers of the retina. Sclerotic vessels were present histopathologically in both the inner and outer layers of the retina. There was a peripheral anterior synechia, ectropion uveae and a fibrovascular membrane, which contained many lumina of neovascularization, indicating marked rubeosis iridis. Small cystic spaces were observed in both the schitic retina in the peripheral region and the foveal schisis at the outer layer of the retina. The photoreceptor cells had become markedly atrophied and multiple regions of calcification were observed. The optic nerve showed severe atrophy with gliosis, but the central retinal artery and vein were still open within the nerve. CONCLUSIONS: These histopathological findings suggest that rubeosis iridis may have developed secondarily to retinal ischemia due to occlusion of the retinal blood vessels.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.099117536746836
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/43. iris mammillations as the only sign of ocular melanocytosis in a child with choroidal melanoma.

    An 8-year-old girl had visual loss in her left eye over 2 months. Ocular examination showed that visual acuity was counting fingers in the left eye. The left iris was moderately pigmented and thickened with numerous confluent, dome-shaped elevations on its surface, consistent with iris mammillations arising from ocular melanocytosis. There was total retinal detachment and an inferiorly located large amelanotic choroidal mass compressing the optic nerve. A specimen from a fine-needle aspiration biopsy showed spindle and epithelioid melanoma cells. The eye was enucleated. Pathologic examination showed that the bland melanocytes comprising the anterior border layer of iris formed focal aggregates, corresponding to the iris mammillations observed clinically. The uvea was diffusely thickened. Arising from the posterior choroid and obscuring the optic nerve head was a moderately pigmented spindle and epithelioid cell choroidal melanoma with diffuse lymphocytic infiltration and high mitotic activity. This case demonstrates that iris mammillations can be the initial manifestation of ocular melanocytosis in the absence of scleral pigmentation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.099117536746836
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/43. Differential diagnosis of corneal oedema assisted by in vivo confocal microscopy.

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate microstructural differences between clinically similar, but aetiologically different, cases of corneal oedema in four subjects. In vivo confocal microscopy highlighted oedema of the basal epithelium, prominent nerve-keratocyte interactions, and typical 'epithelialization' of the endothelium in a case of iridocorneal endothelial syndrome; however, a similar microstructural appearance was observed in a case of presumed herpetic disciform keratitis. The latter diagnosis was subsequently revised on this basis. Confocal examination of fuchs' endothelial dystrophy demonstrated oedema of the basal epithelium, prominent wing cells, anterior stromal alterations, fibrosis of Descemet's membrane and a typical 'strawberry' appearance of the endothelium. In contrast, in vivo microstructural examination of bilateral keratoconus with hydrops confirmed oedema mainly involving the epithelium and anterior stroma. In vivo confocal microscopy allows the clinician to observe the living cornea at a microstructural level and to better diagnose and differentiate borderline or unusual cases of corneal oedema.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.049558768373418
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/43. Pseudophakic pupillary block caused by pupillary capture after phacoemulsification and in-the-bag AcrySof lens implantation.

    We describe a 50-year-old patient who developed pupillary block caused by pupillary capture 1 week after uneventful phacoemulsification and implantation of an AcrySof foldable intraocular lens (IOL). The patient had a large but intact capsulorhexis with the haptics lying in the bag; the optic lay in the pupillary area anterior to the capsulorhexis. This case was successfully managed by a neodymium: YAG laser iridotomy, IOL explantation, and subsequent implantation of a poly(methyl methacrylate) posterior chamber IOL. To prevent this complication, we suggest the optic be larger than the capsulorhexis and advocate correct, gentle insertion of the foldable IOL.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/43. Phakic posterior chamber intraocular lens pupillary block.

    A 49-year-old woman developed bilateral pupillary block after implantation of a phakic posterior chamber intraocular lens despite patent-appearing but nonfunctional peripheral iridotomies. This case serves as a basis to identify clinical signs that distinguish this diagnosis from other causes of elevated intraocular pressure and types of pupillary block.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/43. pupil block glaucoma from traumatic vitreous prolapse in a patient with posterior chamber lens implantation.

    BACKGROUND: Angle closure secondary to pupil block is an entity known to occur in aphakic and pseudophakic patients. In aphakic patients, typically the cause of the pupil block is vitreous prolapse (aphakic pupil block). In pseudophakic patients, the typical cause of the pupil block is an anterior chamber lens implant, often in the absence of an iridectomy (pseudophakic pupil block). Rarely, a hybrid of these two conditions can occur, in which vitreous prolapse causes a pupil block in a pseudophakic patient with a posterior chamber lens implant. methods: The case presented is that of an elderly pseudophakic man with a posterior chamber lens implant who experienced ocular trauma, and who subsequently also experienced a ruptured posterior capsule with resultant vitreous prolapse and pupil block angle closure. Key diagnostic features are presented, as well as patient-specific management for this uncommon condition. CONCLUSIONS: While diagnosis and management of acute primary angle closure are well-known and reported, acute secondary angle closure is not as well reported. It is imperative to understand the mechanism of angle closure, as this properly delineates the management plan. Use of management plans appropriate to acute primary angle closure with pupil block (the use of miotics) could potentially have disastrous consequences in cases of secondary angle closure from vitreous prolapse.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 12
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/43. Pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma.

    The pigment dispersion syndrome is a relatively uncommon condition, occurring as a result of pigment loss from the posterior-pigmented epithelium of the iris, with subsequent redeposition of the pigment throughout the anterior chamber. Obstruction of the trabecular meshwork occasionally leads to pigmentary glaucoma, with increased intraocular pressure, optic nerve head changes, and visual field loss. We present two cases of pigmentary dispersion syndrome, one of which progressed to pigmentary glaucoma with the eventual need for laser trabeculoplasty.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.049558768373418
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/43. Management of lens-iris diaphragm retropulsion syndrome during phacoemulsification.

    Lens-iris diaphragm retropulsion syndrome (LIDRS) occurs more often than recognized during small-incision phacoemulsification. This syndrome requires an infusion of fluid into the anterior chamber and is characterized by posterior displacement of the lens-iris diaphragm, marked deepening of the anterior chamber, posterior iris bowing, pupil dilation, and often significant patient discomfort. Using microendoscopy, we have observed that LIDRS is essentially a reverse pupillary block. We describe a surgical technique to mechanically break the iridocapsular block to restore normal chamber depth, relieve patient discomfort, and allow the surgeon to proceed safely with phacoemulsification.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = block
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/43. In vivo confocal microscopic characteristics of iridocorneal endothelial syndrome.

    PURPOSE: To analyse five cases of iridocorneal endothelial (ice) syndrome and describe the microstructural characteristics observed by in vivo confocal microscopy. methods: All five subjects presented with clinical characteristics suggestive of ice syndrome and were examined clinically by Orbscan II pachymetry and by in vivo confocal microscopy. At least 600 sequential digital confocal images throughout the z-axis were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively for each cornea. RESULTS: Clinically, all subjects presented with: minimal to moderate corneal oedema, focal to diffuse 'beaten metal' appearance of the corneal endothelium, and varying degrees of iris atrophy. Three subjects had a history of elevated intraocular pressure. In vivo confocal microscopy highlighted two main patterns of endothelial change: small cells (mean maximal diameter of 13.6 /- 1.5 micro m), with indistinct borders and very bright and prominent, uniform nuclei (two subjects) and larger, epithelioid-like cells (mean maximal diameter of 26.6 /- 5.5 micro m), with irregular borders and non-homogenous, diversely shaped nuclei (three subjects). Different degrees of alteration of stromal structure, very prominent corneal nerves and unusual syncytia of keratocytes were also observed. Significant oedema of the basal epithelium with increased reflectivity of the intercellular spaces was prominent in all cases. CONCLUSIONS: Although ice syndrome is considered to be primarily an endothelial disease, in vivo confocal microscopy demonstrated structural alterations throughout the entire cornea even in clinically mild cases. The ability of in vivo confocal microscopy to localize and accurately measure various elements in different corneal layers will assist differentiation of various presentations of ice syndrome as this technique becomes increasingly available in clinical practice.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.049558768373418
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Iris Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.