Cases reported "Iris Diseases"

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1/12. Scleral and corneal laceration with iris prolapse caused by an eagle claw.

    BACKGROUND: To describe the visual rehabilitation after surgical treatment of an ocular injury sustained during an attack by a bird of prey. methods: A 51-year-old woman who was attacked by an eagle in a cage had a laceration of cornea and sclera at 9 o' clock, an iris prolapse that was jammed into the scleral wound, and a flat anterior chamber with hyphema. The uncorrected visual acuity was hand movements. Surgical treatment was performed immediately and included iris repositioning and suturing, scleral and conjunctival suturing, and transscleral cryotherapy to the retina. RESULTS: Eight months later, the best corrected visual acuity was 20/20. The anterior segment showed a posterior synechia in the area of the iris repair and an almost round pupil; the crystalline lens showed only a localized opacification. CONCLUSIONS: A bird of prey, even though caged, can injure an eye in humans. With immediate surgical treatment, good visual rehabilitation was achieved in this case. It should be reiterated that spectacles offer no protection against ocular trauma in these cases.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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2/12. Subconjunctival steroid in the management of uveal juvenile xanthogranuloma: a case report.

    Uveal juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) is a rare intraocular tumor which usually occurs in very young children. Most reported cases of successfully treated uveal juvenile xanthogranuloma have received systemic steroids, irradiation or excision. Some cases have responded to topical steroids alone. We report a case of JXG with recurrent hyphemas and elevated intraocular pressures despite the use of topical steroid. This patient responded to the addition of subconjunctival steroid injection. This is the first report to our knowledge demonstrating a response to periocular steroid supplementation for uveal JXG unresponsive to topical steroids.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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3/12. Leukemic iris infiltration as the only site of relapse in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: temporary remission with high-dose chemotherapy.

    A 12-year-old Caucasian boy developed leukemic hyphema with iris infiltration as the only relapse site during the third complete remission of his acute lymphoblastic leukemia. With high-dose methotrexate, high-dose cytosine-arabinoside plus teniposide, and a 5-week course of vincristine, prednisolone, and L-asparaginase, a complete remission could be achieved. maintenance treatment was reinstituted for 1 year. However, after stopping the treatment, the iris infiltrate reappeared, and this time the eye was irradiated after chemotherapeutic reinduction. Seven months later, the boy remains in complete remission. The pathogenesis of leukemic iris infiltration is discussed briefly.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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4/12. argon laser treatment of an abnormal angle vessel producing recurrent hyphema.

    Spontaneous hyphema has been linked to many conditions. We describe a patient with recurrent spontaneous hyphema caused by an abnormal angle vessel without associated rubeosis iridis, glaucoma, or other vascular abnormalities as documented by iris fluorescein angiography. After treatment with several sessions of argon laser photocoagulation, the patient has remained asymptomatic during ten months of follow-up.
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ranking = 6
keywords = hyphema
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5/12. Complications while removing the IOLAB 91Z lens for the UGH-UGH syndrome.

    Five patients having UGH syndrome (uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema plus vitreous hemorrhage) with the IOLAB 91Z intraocular lens (IOL) requiring removal are reported. Preoperative gonioscopy showed the polypropylene loops to be enmeshed in synechias. In four cases the IOL was difficult to remove and two cases had significant intraoperative complications. In one case we used the Nd:YAG laser to cut the synechias preoperatively and effected an easy removal.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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6/12. Traumatic hyphema after radial keratotomy.

    The effect of severe blunt trauma to the human eye six months after radial keratotomy is discussed. After the injury, the patient initially had a 4-mm corneal abrasion, a 75% hyphema of the anterior chamber, and no noted damage to the corneal structure. After six months of follow-up the patient had a confirmed 20% angle recession with traumatic iridoplegia, an uncorrected vision of 6/4.5 (20/15), and a corrected vision of 6/4.5 (20/15). At no time has there been evidence of rupture to the incision sites or damage to the corneal structure. From this case study, it seems likely that the effect of trauma on deep corneal incisions as performed in radial keratotomy does not adversely affect the corneal integrity of the human eye after six months.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hyphema
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7/12. Presumed juvenile xanthogranuloma of the iris and ciliary body in an adult.

    Juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG) of the iris is extremely rare in adults. A case of presumed JXG occurred in a 26-year-old woman who was seen initially with bilateral iris lesions and spontaneous hyphema in one eye. diagnosis was based on the clinical picture and the finding of typical histiocytes obtained by paracentesis and examined by a polymer filtration (Millipore) cytopathologic techniques. Treatment with steroids (given orally and topically to the eye) resulted in a substantial decrease in the size of the iris lesion of the left eye. She has received no medications for 18 months and has shown no signs of progression or other complications 24 months after the initial diagnosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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8/12. Occult iris erosion. A treatable cause of recurrent hyphema in iris-supported intraocular lenses.

    A 78-year-old man underwent intracapsular cataract extraction with implantation of a Binkhorst four-loop lens. Two years later he developed recurrent hyphema, glaucoma, diffusion of blood into the vitreous, and reduction of visual acuity to 3/200. iris fluorescein angiography demonstrated a localized network of prominent collateral vessels without fluorescein leakage above the pupil, deflection and compression of radial iris vessels by the superior lens posts, and a focal area of leakage adjacent to one of the posts. argon laser photocoagulation obliterated the abnormal vessels in each of these areas, eliminated the recurrent hyphema and glaucoma, and permitted recovery of 20/80 visual acuity. The patient died suddenly three months after iris photocoagulation. Histopathologic study of the eye demonstrate erosion of iris stroma and displacement of iris vessels by the lens posts, as well as the vascular effects of successful photocoagulation therapy.
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ranking = 6
keywords = hyphema
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9/12. diagnosis and management of iris juvenile xanthogranuloma.

    BACKGROUND: Juvenile xanthogranuloma is a benign, self-limiting cutaneous disorder most commonly encountered during infancy. Approximately 10% of cases may develop ocular or adnexal involvement, most commonly in the iris. methods: We review clinical and morphological features of four cases of iris juvenile xanthogranuloma that reflect the diagnostic and therapeutic spectrum. RESULTS: Tissue diagnosis was confirmed in all cases; in one case, the disease was diagnosed with a skin biopsy and treated with local and systemic steroids, and its persistence in the iris was confirmed with a second tissue specimen obtained five months after systemic steroid treatment. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis and treatment of juvenile xanthogranuloma may be straightforward, particularly in cases when the ocular lesion receives early attention and responds well to topical steroids, and when there is no hyphema. However, in other instances, this entity may be difficult to manage and may necessitate iris biopsy for diagnosis and radiation therapy for treatment.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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10/12. iris juvenile xanthogranuloma studied by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry.

    An unusual large tan iris mass in a 19-month-old child was removed by iridocyclectomy and studied by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry. The excised mass consisted of granulomatous inflammation with numerous osteoclast-like giant cells and scattered atypical Touton giant cells. immunohistochemistry studies showed that the cells were most consistent with mononuclear histiocytes. flow cytometry showed that 90% of the cells sampled were t-lymphocytes, with a predominance of T-suppresser cytotoxic cells. Juvenile xanthogranuloma (XG) of the iris can occur as a large solitary mass, without signs of intraocular inflammation or hyphema.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hyphema
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