Cases reported "Jaundice, Neonatal"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/5. Splenic injury presenting with isolated scrotal findings in a stable newborn.

    Splenic injury in a newborn is a rare occurrence. It typically presents as an acute abdomen in an unstable patient. The authors present a case of splenic injury in a stable newborn infant with isolated scrotal findings. Workup included a testicular ultrasound scan with colorflow Doppler as well as abdominal and pelvic computerized tomography. The patient was treated nonoperatively with serial hematocrits and examinations and was discharged home after a brief hospital course.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/5. Neonatal jaundice in cystic fibrosis: a conservative approach is not always justified.

    Biliary obstruction due to cystic fibrosis is considered to be reversible and conservative management is recommended. We present two cases of cystic fibrosis with anatomic lesions of the extrahepatic bile ducts, necessitating operative correction. In the management of prolonged neonatal jaundice in cystic fibrosis, a conservative approach is frequently successful, but in some cases surgical intervention may be mandatory.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/5. Resolution of intractable cholestasis associated with total parenteral nutrition following biliary irrigation.

    Although the protracted use of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in infants is known to predispose to cholestasis, which in certain instances may not be reversible, failure to understand the pathogenesis of this condition has hindered the development of an effective medical treatment. That surgical treatment may reverse this process in selected patients is the subject of the present report. Two premature infants and one term infant, with short bowel syndrome acquired in infancy, developed conjugated hyperbilirubinemia following institution of balanced TPN. Infectious and metabolic etiologies for the jaundice were ruled out. No excretion of 99mTc-labeled DISIDA from the biliary tree was demonstrable 24 hours following injection by nuclear scintigraphy, despite the absence of extrahepatic biliary obstruction by abdominal sonography. When all conventional medical methods of managing the problem failed, exploration was performed. Intraoperative cholangiography showed normal intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary ducts in each instance. Irrigation of the biliary tree with normal saline solution was then performed. In all cases, liver biopsies were obtained that were consistent with TPN-associated cholestasis and in all cases, jaundice resolved promptly following operation. We conclude that intractable cholestasis associated with TPN, regardless of its etiology, is a functional abnormality of biliary excretion that may respond in selected patients to irrigation of the biliary tree with radiographic dye and/or normal saline solution.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/5. cystic fibrosis mistaken for idiopathic biliary atresia.

    Previous reports of prolonged jaundice in cystic fibrosis have not described operative and histopathological findings in the liver and biliary tree. In the two cases reported here, obstructive jaundice in the neonatal period was associated with anatomical evidence of intra- or extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Hepatoportoenterostomy, a surgical procedure that is not without complications, was performed on one of the patients for biliary atresia before the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was suspected. Prolonged obstructive jaundice may be an early manifestation of cystic fibrosis and may resolve without operative management. A sweat test should be performed on all patients with prolonged obstructive neonatal jaundice to rule out cystic fibrosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/5. A potential pitfall of operative cholangiography in infants.

    Retrograde linear extravasation of contrast media along the anatomical course of intrahepatic arborizing structures may occur during intraoperative cholangiography for evaluation of prolonged neonatal jaundice. The resultant image may mimic the appearance of intrahepatic biliary radicles.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Jaundice, Neonatal'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.