Cases reported "Jaundice, Obstructive"

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1/2. Pancreatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery complicated with obstructive jaundice. A case report.

    CONTEXT: Pancreatic pseudoaneurysm rupture is a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis, with severe prognosis and high mortality. angiography is usually required for confirmation of the diagnosis, but transabdominal ultrasound and CT angiography are useful noninvasive diagnostic methods. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a 66-year-old patient with a large pancreatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery complicated with obstructive jaundice. Transabdominal ultrasound with color and power Doppler showed a large pancreatic head pseudoaneurysm that communicated directly to the superior mesenteric artery. Presence of a spinning blood flow inside the pseudoaneurysm was visualized by color Doppler, with evidence of bidirectional flow in the pseudoaneurysm neck that was showed by Doppler spectral analysis. The contrast-enhanced helical computer tomography with multiplanar sagittal and the 3D reconstruction of coronal images confirmed the communication of the pseudoaneurysm with the superior mesenteric artery. The patient was scheduled for selective angiography and embolization. However, clinical evolution was rapidly deteriorating, with collapse, hemorrhagic shock and massive hemorrhage. The patient was operated on and subsequently died despite three days of intensive care, due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiorgan failure. CONCLUSION: Non invasive imaging methods consisting of transabdominal ultrasound with color Doppler and contrast-enhanced computer tomography with sagittal reconstruction of coronal images were very useful in the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatic pseudoaneurysm of the superior mesenteric artery complicated with cholestatic jaundice. However, these imaging methods do not obviate the need for diagnostic and therapeutic angiography, eventually followed by surgical intervention in cases of recurrent bleeding or hemodynamic unstable patients.
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2/2. An alternative surgical approach to a difficult case of mirizzi syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    mirizzi syndrome (MS) is an uncommon complication of gallstone disease and occurs in approximately 1% of all patients suffering from cholelithiasis. The syndrome is characterized by extrinsic compression of the common hepatic duct frequently resulting in clinical presentation of intermittent or constant jaundice. Most cases are not identified preoperatively. Surgery is the indicated treatment for patients with MS. We report here a 71-year-old male patient referred to the surgical outpatient department for diffuse upper abdominal pain and mild jaundice (bilirubin rate: 4.2 mg/dL). Ultrasound examination revealed a stone in the cystic duct compressing the common hepatic duct. The patient had a history of gastrectomy for gastric ulcer 30 years ago. MRCP revealed a stone impacted in the cystic duct causing obstruction of the common hepatic duct by extrinsic compression. With these findings the preoperative diagnosis was indicative of MS. At laparotomy a moderately shrunken gallbladder was found embedded in adhesions containing a large stone which was palpable in the common bile duct. The anterior wall of the body of the gallbladder was opened by an incision which extended longitudinally along the gallbladder towards the common bile duct. The stone measuring 3.0 cm in diameter, was then removed setting astride a large communication with the common bile duct. A Roux-en-Y cholecysto-choledocho-jejunostomy was performed. The subhepatic region was drained. The patient had an uneventful recovery. He was discharged eleven days after operation and remained well after a 30-mo follow-up.
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