Cases reported "Jaundice"

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1/38. Prolonged recovery after extended right hepatic lobectomy in a patient with severe blunt liver injury and laceration of the vena cava. A report of case with special references to autotransfusion and complications of biliary decompression.

    A patient with severe blunt liver injury and laceration of the vena cava who underwent a successful extended right hepatic lobectomy is reported. The use of autotransfusion unit saved the patient from exsanguination. His postoperative course was complicated by renal and hepatic failure, bile leakage, and persistent jaundice due to cholangitis. Prolonged choledochal drainage via T-tube obviously acted as a source of infection. The use of autotransfusion, choledochal drainage and the proper timing of its removal, the treatment of vena cava lesions and jaundice due to cholangitis in patients with severe liver trauma are discussed.
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2/38. Severe jaundice in a gunshot casualty due to the coexistence of Dubin-Johnson and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    We report an unusual case of a 21-year-old man who was shot in his abdomen in the course of a robbery. He was previously diagnosed as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient. Mild icterus was noticed on admission to the emergency room. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a perforated ileal loop that was resected, and because the liver color was greenish black, a liver biopsy was performed during the operation. After operation the patient went through a severe icteric state that resolved spontaneously within a few days. Urinary coproporphyrin levels, along with compatible liver biopsy, confirmed the diagnosis of Dubin-Johnson disease. Severe hyperbilirubinemia after an abdominal injury is uncommon and is usually due to either a biliary duct injury or iatrogenic injury. This case presents an unusual cause of severe postoperative jaundice due to the rare coexistence of two inherited disorders.
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keywords = operative
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3/38. liver failure with steatonecrosis after jejunoileal bypass: recovery with parenteral nutriton and reanastomosis.

    Two women, aged 41 and 51 years, developed jaundice, encephalopathy, and hypoprothrombinemia during rapid weight loss four and 12 months after jejunoileal bypass for refractory obesity. Both were treated for liver failure and received a prolonged course of nutrition parenterally and orally. Serial liver biopsy specimens demonstrated extensive alcoholic-like hepatitis and cirrhosis that improved with nutritional repletion and reanastomosis. Postoperative biopsy specimens later demonstrated minimal portal fibrosis in one patient and inactive mild cirrhosis in the other. Although previous reports indicate that patients usually die when they develop liver failure of this severity after jejunoileal bypass, prolonged intensive nutritional repletion was associated with sufficient clinical and histologic improvement in these two patients so that intestinal reanastomosis could be performed safely.
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4/38. Ampullectomy of carcinoma of the papilla of vater in an elderly patient without jaundice.

    A 79 year-old woman was admitted to Aioi City Hospital for a closer examination of hepatic dysfunction. A filling defect was observed at the distal end of the intrapancreatic common bile duct by computed tomography combined with drip infusion cholangiography. The diagnosis of adenoma with dysplasia at the papilla of Vater was obtained by a biopsy performed during duodenoscopy. As a result, we performed an ampullectomy. Histologic examination revealed a papillary adenocarcinoma which partly extended just beyond the muscle of Oddi. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged on the 35th postoperative day. Here, based upon our experience, we discuss such problems as the accuracy of preoperative diagnosis and the indications for ampullectomy.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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5/38. Pleural dissemination as a complication of preoperative percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: report of a case.

    One potential risk of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is tumor seeding along the catheter tract. A 57-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice due to hilar cholangiocarcinoma underwent an extended left hepatic lobectomy, a regional lymph node dissection, and a right hepaticojejunostomy 2 weeks after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Multiple right pleural masses were found on a chest radiogram 14 months after the operation. No recurrent lesions were detected in the abdominal cavity. A right panpleuropneumonectomy was performed; however, the patient died of respiratory failure due to tumor recurrence 9 months after the second operation. Preoperative percutaneous transhepatich biliary drainage was considered to have resulted in pleural implantation.
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ranking = 5
keywords = operative
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6/38. Green skin discoloration associated with multiple organ failure.

    OBJECTIVE: To report intense green hyperpigmentation related to FD & C Blue No. 1. DESIGN: Retrospective case review. SETTING: Surgical intensive care unit. PATIENT: A 67-yr-old woman with unstable angina, electrocardiographic S-T segment elevation, and a left ventricle thrombus requiring emergent coronary revascularization surgery. INTERVENTIONS: Postoperative monitoring and treatment for multiple organ dysfunction that included small-bowel tube feeding and propofol sedation. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The patient developed an intense green skin color. CONCLUSION: patients with multiple organ failure may be at risk for unusual pigmentation effects from tube feeding dyes.
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7/38. Smallest Todani's type II choledochal cyst.

    A choledochal cyst is defined as an isolated or combined congenital dilation of the extra hepatic or intrahepatic biliary tree. Todani and colleagues proposed the five types of congenital choledochal cysts which have gained widespread acceptance. Type II choledochal cyst, a diverticulum of common bile duct, is rarest, and most reported cases of Type II were as large as several centimeters in size. We herein report the case of a small Type II choledochal cyst which was resected at pancreatoduodenectomy for carcinoma of the papilla of Vater. A 58-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of jaundice. Preoperative cholangiogram via the percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage tube revealed a complete obstruction at the narrow terminal segment. Furthermore, a small diverticular protrusion was demonstrated on the lower part of the common bile duct. The resected specimen showed a 2.2 x 1.7 x 1.2 cm carcinoma of the major papilla, and a deep, 2 mm in diameter and 5 mm in depth, depression on the posterior wall of the common bile duct. The anomalous pancreatobiliary duct was not seen. The deep depression was confirmed microscopically to penetrate the fibromuscular layer of the common bile duct and diagnosed as a Todani's Type II choledochal cyst. To our knowledge, the current case is the smallest Type II choledochal cyst which was completely resected.
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keywords = operative
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8/38. jaundice due to extrabiliary gallstones.

    OBJECTIVE: cholecystectomy is one of the most common general surgical procedures performed today. The laparoscopic approach is beneficial to patients in terms of length of stay, postoperative pain, return to work, and cosmesis. Some drawbacks are associated with the minimal access form of cholecystectomy, including an increased incidence of common bile duct injuries. In addition, when the gallbladder is inadvertently perforated during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, retrieval of dropped gallstones may be difficult. We present a case in which gallstones spilled during cholecystectomy, causing near circumferential, extraluminal common hepatic duct compression, and clinical jaundice 1 year later. methods: The patient experienced jaundice and pruritus 12 months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. A computed tomographic scan was interpreted as cholelithiasis, but otherwise was normal (despite a previous cholecystectomy). Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed and a stent placed across a stenotic common hepatic duct. RESULTS: The results of brush biopsies were negative. The stent rapidly occluded and surgical intervention was undertaken. At exploratory laparotomy, an abscess cavity containing multiple gallstones was encountered. This abscess had encircled the common hepatic duct, causing compression and fibrosis. The stones were extracted and a hepaticojejunostomy was tailored. The patient's bilirubin level slowly decreased and she recovered without complication. CONCLUSIONS: gallstones lost within the peritoneal cavity usually have no adverse sequela. Recently, however, numerous reports have surfaced describing untoward events. This case is certainly one to be included on the list. A surgeon should make every attempt to retrieve spilled gallstones due to the potential later complications described herein.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/38. Auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation in the treatment of acute liver failure: a case report.

    A successful experience with auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation (APOLT) for acute liver failure is reported in a 29-year-old woman who experienced jaundice, generalized erythema for 7 days, and decreased mentation for 3 days. Two months prior, she suffered pulmonary tuberculosis, being currently treated with antituberculous medications, which caused the fulminant hepatic failure. We decided to perform APOLT based on two facts. The first was the possibility that the diseased native liver may recover sufficiently to withdraw the immunosuppressants. Second, the pulmonary tuberculosis may have been worsened by immunosuppression. We removed the extended lateral section of the recipient for the graft. The left hepatic vein of the extended left lateral graft was anastomosed to the left hepatic vein of the recipient. The left portal vein of the graft was anastomosed to the left portal vein of the recipient. The right portal vein of the recipient was left without any manipulation. A duct-to-duct anastomosis was performed. On postoperative day 3, antituberculous medications were started. On the postoperative day 37, she was discharged without any problems. On the postoperative day 120, she showed no event of rejection, and her pulmonary symptoms improved. We performed the operation without transection of the portal branch to the native liver, but no functional competition has been discovered.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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10/38. Pancreatic mass of unusual etiology: case report of metastatic disease after a prolonged lag phase.

    Although not a typical site, the pancreas does occasionally harbor metastatic disease. Management of these metastases differs from the management of conventional primary cancers. Our case is one of an 85-year-old female presenting with obstructive jaundice and whose workup revealed a pancreatic mass. Her past medical history included a mastectomy 14 years previous for invasive lobular carcinoma. She underwent celiotomy, and an intraoperative diagnosis of metastatic lobular carcinoma of the breast was made based on frozen section. Due to pulmonary metastasis and vascular infiltration, which precluded pancreatoduodenectomy, the patient underwent palliative bypass and fared well postoperatively. With more aggressive management of primary breast cancers in the past decade, isolated metastatic disease is of increasing concern and raises questions about surgical strategies to be implemented with these patients. For instance, should palliative treatment be considered or should a radical intention to cure procedure be performed despite the metastatic disease? Factors favoring radical procedures include prolonged lag phase between the primary and the recurrence; presence of well-differentiated tumors; and isolated metastatic disease. Primary lung and renal cancers metastasize more frequently than breast cancers do to the pancreas. Hence, existing literature has not clearly defined indications for radical treatment of metastatic breast cancers to the pancreas. Based on experiences with metastatic renal and lung cancers, one can reasonably infer that radical procedures performed on selected cases could possibly achieve a cure or prolonged disease-free survival. The key factor in determining whether the patient undergoes palliative versus radical treatment is a slow growth pattern of the tumor, characterized by a prolonged lag phase between the primary and the metastatic disease.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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