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1/9. Design of a cast bar reinforced provisional restoration for the management of the interim phase in implant dentistry.

    Implant therapy is becoming the treatment of choice for the replacement of teeth in partially edentulous arches. The interim phase of implant treatment often presents particular problems because of the position of the remaining teeth, their periodontal status, and the loss of vertical dimension of occlusion. This case report will discuss the design and fabrication of a cast bar reinforced long-span provisional restoration based on a diagnostic wax-up to simplify the management of the interim phase.
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2/9. Short and sticky options in the treatment of the partially dentate patient.

    As we move into the twenty-first century, patterns of dental disease in adults are changing. Surveys of adult dental health indicate that more people are keeping their teeth for longer in life. In many cases, the ravages of dental disease and the cumulative effect of a lifetime of restorative dentistry lead to gradual tooth loss. For many of these patients, restoration of a complete dentition may not be feasible nor desirable. In recent years, functionally oriented treatment planning has become acceptable in light of recent research findings. Using this approach, treatment efforts and resources are directed principally at retaining the 'strategic' part of the dentition in the long term, ie, the anterior and premolar teeth. This paper describes, with the aid of treated cases, a means of combining a shortened dental arch strategy with resin bonded bridgework. With the aid of recent research in this area of clinical practice, some suggestions as to the use of the technique are also described.
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3/9. Treatment planning to retain hopeless teeth as support for transitional appliances: three case reports.

    Treatment in endosteal implant dentistry follows an orderly sequence. Determining a patient's need and desire, removal of hopeless teeth, bone augmentation (if necessary), implant placement, implant uncovery, and prosthetic restoration are considered in order. Three case reports that alter traditional treatment planning sequence are presented. Possible potential benefits and disadvantages to practitioners and patients are discussed.
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4/9. Implant treatment and the role of platelet rich plasma.

    Implant supported restorations have become and continue to be a very popular clinical option for patients who are either partially or completely edentulous. This article, the third in a series dealing with implant dentistry, describes the role of platelet rich plasma as an adjunct to help with the healing process following tooth extraction, socket preservation, and, ultimately, replacement with implant supported restorations. A clinical case is used to illustrate surgical options available in the restoration of the posterior partially edentulous maxilla.
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5/9. Form and function in cosmetic dentistry.

    The results of the case presented meet the aesthetic requirement of the patient as well as the biomechanical and functional requirements for long-term comfort, function, and stability. If not for the extra time spent with the patient uncovering the relationship between her occlusion and headaches and gaining her confidence by solving that problem first, we never would have had the opportunity to build a relationship that would allow her to proceed confidently with the cosmetic treatment that she described as the "best darn holiday present ever!"
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6/9. Psychosocial factors for failure to adapt to dental prostheses.

    Currently, the best approach to the care and treatment of the patient with phantom bite lies in the dentist's familiarity with the signs and symptoms of these syndromes. This is especially important for those dentists interested in the practice of prosthetic dentistry. The patient with phantom bite presents problems for which there are no conventional solutions. This situation is not an isolated phenomenon for dentistry. Rapid and major advances in dental technology and public health programs during the last few decades have radically changed the character of the patient population. Interventions have become more effective and thus more contributive to a larger chronic dental population. Fewer persons lose their teeth. Palliation has become an alternative to the edentate state. Prolongation of the dentition has created need for the more complex treatments. These resulting interventions have also increased the number of organic, psychogenic, sociogenic, and iatrogenic complaints. Many of these complaints are not curable but nor are they terminal with regard to the dentition. For these chronic patient groups, dentistry has become an illness maintenance system. Thus, treatment intervention must begin to be viewed within the context of the ever-increasing complexity of technologic advances. In many cases, prolonged dental intervention and palliation result in the emergence of symptoms secondary to treatment. These secondary symptoms or "side effects" are sometimes more destructive than the disease the treatment was intended to palliate. Treatment, although frequently helpful, can, under certain circumstances, harm the patient. Phantom bite may be a metaphor for such a circumstance, as virtually all treatments promote the illness. Nowhere in the practice of dentistry is the advice of Szasz more relevant: "Don't just do something, stand there!"
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7/9. The use of orthodontics before fixed prosthodontics in restorative dentistry.

    For a variety of reasons, orthodontic intervention is often overlooked as a viable modality to correct occlusal, axial, rotational, and space discrepancies before undertaking fixed prosthetic rehabilitation. However, patient treatment is being enhanced as never before by such intervention. This valuable treatment option facilitates tooth preparation, path of insertion, optimum oral hygiene, and a better pontic and abutment design, while occlusal forces can be directed against the long axes of the teeth for a more predictable prognosis. Moreover, this interdisciplinary approach can be cost-effective to patients and their treating dentists from the standpoint of producing more stable, durable, and esthetic restorations.
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8/9. R.A.P.I.D. Reconstructive alternative for prosthetics in implant dentistry.

    As stated at the outset, this technique is not for every case. Each case must be selected with great care, consideration and careful planning. In concert with observing the Implant Lighthouses, this technique can produce a successful case. It can be done to save time, without compromising the prescribed techniques and quality.
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9/9. Soft tissue ridge augmentation to correct an esthetic deformity caused by adversely placed implants: a case report.

    A patient presented with two osseointegrated implants placed in a ridge deformity that had resulted from a traumatic injury during an automobile accident. The implant placement and subsequent restorative dentistry resulted in a poor esthetic result and difficult maintenance. Treatment included multiple soft tissue grafts to submerge the implants and augment the ridge. The patient was then restored with a conventional fixed partial denture.
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