Cases reported "Joint Loose Bodies"

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1/15. Chondromatosis of the ankle joint (Reichel syndrome).

    A case of chondromatosis of the upper ankle joint in childhood is described. It is a monoarticular disease with a good prognosis, frequently without known prior trauma or inflammation, although often free fragments of cartilage are seen in the joint cavities. It originates from the synovium of the joint, and is known in the literature as Reichel syndrome.
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keywords = synovium
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2/15. Synovial chondromatosis of the subcoracoid bursa.

    Synovial chondromatosis, is the chondroid metaplasia of the synovial membrane. Large joints such as the knee and hip are most commonly involved. Extraarticular involvement is rarely described. Synovial chondromatosis may be associated with impingement syndrome of the shoulder. We report a case of synovial chondromatosis of the subcoracoid bursa, which resulted in impingement symptoms.
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ranking = 3.7640052597487
keywords = synovial membrane, membrane
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3/15. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: varying presentation in 4 cases.

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare condition in which cartilage is formed in the synovial membrane of a joint. The manifestations of this benign neoplastic process can mimic many common temporomandibular joint and parotid diseases. Four cases of synovial chondromatosis are presented. In each case, atypical presentation, coexisting joint disease, or both caused diagnostic confusion. The histories and physical examinations were initially consistent with more common joint diseases in each case. Imaging provided some insight into diagnosis and was a definitive indication for surgical treatment. Treatment by subtotal synovectomy and by removal of chondromatous nodules were undertaken in each case. No patient in our series has had recurrence of disease or symptoms after surgical treatment.
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ranking = 3.7640052597487
keywords = synovial membrane, membrane
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4/15. Localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee: diagnostic challenge and arthroscopic treatment: a report of three cases.

    The localized form of pigmented villonodular synovitis (LPVS) is a lesion characterized by focal involvement of the synovial membrane. The knee is the most commonly affected joint. We report three cases of LPVS of the knee which were not diagnosed upon clinical evaluation. The aim is to bring the attention of clinicians to this pathological entity, which is often regarded as extremely rare and is therefore not considered in the early differential diagnosis of various knee derangements. Diagnostic and therapeutic arthroscopy was performed. The lesions were completely resected and patohistological findings confirmed the diagnosis of LPVS. All of our three patients have remained asymptomatic at 8, 10, and 12-month follow-ups.
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ranking = 3.7640052597487
keywords = synovial membrane, membrane
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5/15. Synovial osteochondromatosis of the suprapatellar bursa with an imperforate suprapatellar plica.

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a rare disease characterized by cartilaginous and osseous metaplasia of the joint synovium. While it may affect practically any synovial joint, the knee is most often affected. An imperforate suprapatellar plica is also a rare finding in the knee. We report an exceptionally rare case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the knee characterized by isolated multiple loose bodies in the suprapatellar bursa caused by imperforate suprapatellar plica in a 52-year-old woman. The case was successfully treated by arthroscopic surgery. A worse-case scenario and possible diagnostic and therapeutic challenges are discussed.
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6/15. Secondary osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa: a report of two cases and review of the literature.

    osteochondromatosis is classified into primary and secondary lesions; primary osteochondromatosis is a tumor-like lesion, whereas secondary lesions are due to such joint or bursal disorders as osteoarthritis and osteochondral fractures. There is no clinical distinction between these two conditions. Only the pathological findings of loose bodies and synovium can clearly distinguish between them. In this report, we present two patients with secondary osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa. Both had shoulder pain and were treated surgically. We discuss methods of differentiating between primary and secondary lesions and elucidate the pathogenesis of osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa by analyzing findings for 17 shoulders with this condition reported in the literature. We also present two more cases. We reviewed the 12 cases of osteochondromatosis in the literature for histopathological findings of loose bodies and the presence or absence of acromial osteophytes. Our findings suggest that osteochondromatosis of the subacromial bursa is secondary in most cases, and that osteocartilaginous fragments from acromial osteophytes can be shed into the subacromial bursa and grow into loose bodies.
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7/15. Multiple loose bodies in the joints: from snowstorm to hailstones.

    We report the cases of 2 young-adult patients with multiple loose bodies, one in the knee and the other in the elbow joint. Loose bodies were composed of hundreds of brilliant white particles up to 5 mm in the first patient, who had a history of pain and swelling. From the right elbow joint of the second patient, arthroscopic removal of about 25 osteocartilaginous loose bodies, ranging from 5 to 14 mm in diameter, was performed. This patient also had the effects of poliomyelitis, which had required him to use a crutch since childhood for right lower limb length discrepancy. Arthroscopic removal provided elimination of symptoms in both patients. Histopathologic examination of the specimens and clinical evidence supported the previously proposed pathogenic mechanisms on development of loose bodies. Mechanisms that could affect the natural history of loose bodies in these particular patients are discussed and speculated on in this report. We suggest that some of the numerous cartilaginous multiple loose bodies in the joints (snowstorm appearance) are attached and incorporated into synovium and the total number decreases with time, while the remaining grow with nutritional effects of synovial fluid medium, resulting in larger loose bodies with osteocartilaginous characteristics. The term "hailstone" is used to describe the ultimate situation of the previous arthroscopically defined snowstorm loose bodies.
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8/15. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis.
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9/15. Shoulder rheumatoid arthritis associated with chondromatosis, treated by arthroscopy.

    We present a case of rheumatoid arthritis that affected the right shoulder and was associated with chondromatosis and multiple loose body formation. The arthritis was treated arthroscopically with satisfactory results after a follow-up period of 15 months. In our case, arthroscopic debridement and partial synovectomy not only relieved the pain but also improved the range of motion the night after surgery. The multiple loose bodies irritating the synovium and causing effusion, crepitus, and locking were also removed. One may need to change portals of the scope and suction cannula to remove loose bodies in different joint spaces. The subacromial space must be searched for loose bodies. Thorough cleaning, lavage, and synovectomy are important parts of this surgery. The continuous passive motion (CPM) machine in the immediate postoperative period was helpful.
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keywords = synovium
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10/15. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: report of two cases.

    Two cases of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are reported. This condition is rare but benign, with only 36 cases reported in the literature to date. Symptoms include tenderness, swelling, and limited range of motion, with deviation to the affected side. diagnosis is made both from the clinical presentation and histologic examination. The etiology is thought to be cartilaginous foci within the synovial membrane that become detached and proliferate in the synovium as chondrocytes. Treatment includes removal of the "loose bodies" and possible resection of the synovial membrane, condyle, and disk.
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ranking = 8.5280105194974
keywords = synovial membrane, synovium, membrane
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