Cases reported "Joint Loose Bodies"

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1/7. Synovial osteochondromatosis complicating pilon fracture of the tibia.

    A case of previously undiagnosed synovial osteochondromatosis complicating a tibial pilon fracture is presented. The entrapment of osteochondral bodies within the fracture margin prevented complete reduction of the fracture and necessitated surgical intervention.
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keywords = tibia
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2/7. Loose intra-articular body following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    We report a case of intra-articular fracture of a bioabsorbable fixation device from the femoral tunnel in an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a bone-tendon-bone graft. Thirteen months after successful reconstruction surgery, the patient experienced episodes of locking and medial joint pain. There was no history of trauma and no symptoms of instability or swelling. On revision arthroscopy, a fractured tip of a bioabsorbable RIGIDfix cross pin (Mitek, Westwood, MA) was identified in the medial compartment of the knee. There was a broad area of chondral erosion affecting the medial femoral condyle and a small defect to the medial tibial plateau where the loose body had been lodged. The bone-tendon-bone graft was intact without disruption. After arthroscopy, the patient was symptom free for 3 weeks but then developed further symptoms of locking. magnetic resonance imaging showed another loose body within the knee. A repeat arthroscopy was performed 6 weeks after the earlier procedure and another piece of the polylactic acid RIGIDfix cross pin was removed, this time from the lateral gutter. This case raises concern about the potential for breakage and resultant loose body formation that may occur after bioabsorbable cross-pin fixation and, particularly, the associated chondral damage that can occur if early intervention is not conducted.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
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3/7. Calcified loose bodies trapped in the lateral synovial recess of the knee.

    Calcified loose bodies originate in the knee joint for a variety of reasons and are removed when symptomatic. We present the case of a 56-year-old man who had multiple calcified bodies located in a sac beneath the iliotibial band known as the lateral synovial recess of the knee. Despite the fact that these loose bodies likely arose from the joint, they were unable to be visualized during arthroscopy and required a separate lateral incision for removal.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
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4/7. Localized chondrocalcinosis of the lateral tibial condyle presenting as a loose body in a young athlete.

    chondrocalcinosis, although very rare in young adults, can occur in some young patients. Although its presenting clinical history or radiographic findings may resemble those of an intraarticular loose body, chondrocalcinosis can occur in young athletes, possibly after repetitive microtrauma, and should be included in the differential diagnosis of calcified intraarticular lesions in the young athlete.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = tibia
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5/7. Arthroscopic excision of intra-articular ossifications. A case report and review of the literature.

    The first reported case of arthroscopic removal of an intra-articular ossified fragment is presented in a patient with melorheostosis of the knee. In this case, the patient's medical history revealed that prior to presentation the patient had experienced transient locking problems with the same knee that spontaneously resolved. Roentgenograms confirmed a 2-cm loose body in the intra-articular space of the left knee and multiple calcified aggregations in the distal femur and proximal tibia. The patient underwent arthroscopy to remove the loose body in the knee, an an intraoperative exam revealed no other abnormalities. Two years postoperatively, the patient reported no knee problems.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
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6/7. Arthroscopic advancement of a tibial nail.

    Rapid restoration of maximal extremity function has stimulated the aggressive treatment of tibia fractures with intramedullary nails. Rod migration is a well-described complication of flexible or unlocked intramedullary rods. Interarticular extrusion of an unlocked tibial rod occurred in a patient after a second accident. arthroscopy was used to evaluate the chondral injury, as well as to advance the rod.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = tibia
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7/7. Iatrogenic posterior tibial nerve division during ankle arthroscopy.

    Ankle arthroscopy has been increasingly applied to the diagnostic and therapeutic treatment of ankle disorders. Owing to the complex cutaneous anatomy of the ankle, neurological injuries are a potential complication of this procedure. All reports of neurological complications resulting from ankle arthroscopy have attributed them to use of a distractor pin or to portal placement. Several authors have noted the possibility of damage to the deep peroneal nerve from the use of motorized arthroscopic tools within the anterior ankle joint capsule. We present what we believe to be the first reported case of complete division of the posterior tibial nerve resulting from an apparently overaggressive intra-articular manipulation during ankle arthroscopy performed for loose body removal.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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