Cases reported "Keratitis"

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1/72. exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis keratitis after keratoplasty.

    We report the first French case of an intraocular infection due to exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis. Two months after a second corneal transplant for congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy, the patient presented with ocular pain and corneal infiltrates leading to the graft rejection. diagnosis was established by positive direct examination and cultures of the same fungus from corneal buttons, iris biopsies and ablated sutures.
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2/72. Mycotic keratitis due to Curvularia senegalensis and in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of Curvularia spp.

    A case of mycotic keratitis due to Curvularia senegalensis is reported. This case represents the third known reported infection caused by this rare species. Fungal hyphae were detected in corneal scrapings, and repeated cultures were positive for this fungi. The patient was presumed cured after a corneal transplant and treatment with itraconazole, but the infection recurred and the patient is waiting for a keratoplasty. The in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the case strain and another 24 strains belonging to seven species of Curvularia were tested for six antifungal agents. With the exception of flucytosine, and occasionally fluconazole, the other drugs assayed (amphotericin b, miconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole) were highly effective in vitro.
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3/72. The spectrum of ocular inflammation caused by euphorbia plant sap.

    OBJECTIVE: To report the spectrum of clinical findings in patients with ocular inflammation caused by plant sap from euphorbia species. DESIGN: Clinical case series. SETTING: ophthalmology emergency referrals in the United Kingdom. patients: We examined 7 patients, all of whom gave a history of recent ocular exposure to the sap of euphorbia species. INTERVENTIONS: All patients were treated with antibiotic drops or ointment (chloramphenicol). Cycloplegic and steroid drops were also used for some patients. patients were observed until all signs and symptoms had resolved. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms, visual acuity, and clinical signs of inflammation. All patients provided a specimen of the plant for formal identification. RESULTS: Initial symptoms were generally burning or stinging pain with blurred vision. In most cases, visual acuity was reduced between 1 and 2 Snellen lines. In 1 patient with age-related maculopathy, acuity dropped from 20/80 to hand motions before recovering. Clinical findings varied from a mild epithelial keratoconjunctivitis to a severe keratitis with stromal edema, epithelial sloughing, and anterior uveitis. All signs and symptoms had resolved by 1 to 2 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: These cases illustrate the range of severity of euphorbia sap keratouveitis. The condition seems to be self-limiting when managed supportively. People who work with euphorbia plant species should wear eye protection. Clinicians managing keratopathy caused by euphorbia species should be aware of the danger of sight-threatening infection and uveitis, particularly during the first few days.
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4/72. Postoperative mycobacterium chelonae endophthalmitis after extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of postoperative endophthalmitis caused by mycobacterium chelonae after extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. DESIGN: Interventional case report. methods: The history and clinical presentation of a 66-year-old female patient, in whom a low-grade delayed-onset endophthalmitis and keratitis developed after extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation, is described. Microbiologic investigations of the scrapings of corneal infiltrate at the cataract incision site, aqueous humor and eviscerated material, and histopathologic study of eviscerated material and an enlarged cervical lymph node were performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The clinical, histopathologic, and microbiologic findings in a case of low-grade delayed-onset endophthalmitis. RESULTS: Analysis of the direct smear of both the corneal infiltrate as well as the eviscerated material revealed acid-fast bacilli. M. chelonae was isolated from these specimens. Direct smear and culture of the aqueous humor were negative for bacteria (including mycobacteria) and fungus. Histopathologic examination of the eviscerated material showed a dense infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the uveal tissue, extensive necrosis and hemorrhage, and exudates with hemorrhage in the vitreous cavity. Histopathologic examination of the lymph node revealed granulomatous inflammation with caseation necrosis, but did not reveal acid-fast bacilli. CONCLUSIONS: M. chelonae, although infrequent, should be considered an etiologic agent of delayed-onset, postoperative endophthalmitis and early bacterial diagnosis should help in institution of appropriate therapy.
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5/72. A case of atypical Cogan's syndrome with uncommon corneal findings.

    PURPOSE: We report a case of atypical bilateral interstitial keratitis associated with Cogan's syndrome. methods: A 28-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of recurrent bilateral keratitis. Bilateral hearing loss preceded the ocular symptoms by 2 years. The patient also complained of skin nodules, headache, back pain, and arthritis. Corneal finding were consistent with superior stromal keratitis with stromal neovascularization and lipid deposition in the stroma. The patient's audiogram revealed cochlear pathology compatible with Cogan's syndrome (sensorineural deafness). RESULTS: The patient was treated with topical steroids but eventually required corneal transplantation in the right eye as a consequence of progressive loss of vision secondary to progressive lipid keratopathy. Visual acuity at the patient's most recent follow-up evaluation was 20/40. CONCLUSION: This case represents an unusual type of interstitial keratitis associated with Cogan's disease. The absence of ocular symptoms at the time of initial ear involvement and the atypical presentation of the keratitis were responsible for the delay in diagnosis in this patient, resulting in hearing impairment.
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6/72. Cogan's syndrome: organ-specific autoimmune disease or systemic vasculitis? A report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Cogan's syndrome is a rare disorder of unknown origin characterized by inflammatory eye disease and vestibuloauditory symptoms. Typically, young adults suffer from interstitial keratitis and sudden onset of tinnitus and hearing loss. Few cases (around 150) have been published and thus it is difficult to determine the percentage of patients with underlying systemic disorders such as systemic vasculitis. The variety of systemic manifestations is large and includes fever, splenomegaly, lymphadenopath, and musculoskeletal complaints. systemic vasculitis can be seen in around 10% of cases and may involve the large vessels, appearing as Takayasu-like vasculitis with affection of the aortic valve but also the coronary arteries and the small kidney vasculature. Evaluating the exact extension of the systemic features determines the choice of treatment. While corticosteroids have proved to be of short-term benefit, long-term treatment with immunosuppressive drugs is controversial. Auditory function in deaf patients has often been restored successfully with cochlear implants. To illustrate the nature of the syndrome, we present two patients with a wide clinical spectrum of symptoms from local disease restricted to the eyes and ears to a widespread vasculitis affecting arteries of the brain, kidney and the upper and lower extremities. We then review the typical aspects as well as the etiology of the disease.
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7/72. gold implant treatment for discomfort induced by a filtering bleb.

    We present a post-trabeculectomy patient suffering from blurred vision and foreign body sensation that was not alleviated by conventional treatments. Our treatment involved placing a gold weight implant onto the anterior surface of the tarsal plate to gravity-assist closure and increase coverage of the filtering bleb.
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8/72. Clinical application of living-related conjunctival-limbal allograft.

    PURPOSE: To report one successful case of conjunctival-limbal allograft for the treatment of a severe ocular surface disorder. methods: Interventional case report. A 9-year-old patient suffering from stevens-johnson syndrome with total keratinization of the ocular surface of both eyes was treated in the left eye by corneal and conjunctival stem cell transplantation. Oral cyclosporin A and topical autologous serum and corticosteroids were administered. RESULTS: Mucosal epithelial phenotype was maintained in the left eye at most recent examination for more than 3 years after ocular surface reconstruction. CONCLUSION: A total keratinized ocular surface may be treated with the combination of conjunctival and corneal stem cell transplantation.
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9/72. Delayed diffuse lamellar keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Two cases are reported of delayed diffuse lamellar keratitis after uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis. The first patient presented with an epithelial defect 6 weeks after laser in situ keratomileusis. Three days later the defect was healed but diffuse lamellar keratitis was noted. This was treated with topical dexamethasone and ketorolac with complete resolution of the diffuse lamellar keratitis over 3 weeks. The second patient presented with an epithelial defect and gross diffuse lamellar keratitis 10 weeks after laser in situ keratomileusis. Treatment was with topical dexamethasone and ciprofloxacin with gradual resolution of the diffuse lamellar keratitis. Common to both patients was a background of rosacea, implanted debris with no initial reaction, and epithelial defects leading to diffuse lamellar keratitis. It is suggested that these two cases represent epithelial defect associated corneal infiltration, which resembles classical diffuse lamellar keratitis with the spread of inflammatory cells through a path of least resistance.
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10/72. More than tears in your eyes (exophiala jeanselmei keratitis).

    PURPOSE: To describe a patient with exophiala jeanselmei keratitis. methods. CASE REPORT: One patient with persistent corneal infiltrate that developed several days after a minor ocular trauma from an onion slice. RESULTS: culture plates from corneal scraping showed a growth of the yeast exophiala jeanselmei, a rare causative agent of ocular infection. CONCLUSIONS: Whenever a corneal abscess does not improve with the usual antibiotic treatment, a thorough ophthalmic history should be taken to determine whether there was a recent ocular trauma. If the trauma was caused by a plant material, the physician should raise the possibility of an unusual fungal infection.
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