Cases reported "Kidney Calculi"

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11/118. ESWL in the treatment of stone in child with horseshoe kidney.

    We report a case of struvite calculi in the child with horseshoe kidney treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Complete stone clearance was obtained after 3 sessions using Siemens Lithostar Lithotriptor.
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12/118. Vertebral fracture associated with shockwave lithotripsy in a patient with granulomatous spondylitis.

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is an accepted treatment modality in the treatment of urinary stone disease. Many complications have been reported secondary to high-energy shockwaves, but the effects of SWL on the skeletal system have rarely been investigated. We represent the first case of a burst-type vertebral fracture after SWL in an elderly osteoporotic patient with granulomatous spondylitis.
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13/118. An absence of changes in kidney tissues after an enormous number of shock waves.

    Repeated sessions of unilateral extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) were performed in a patient with multiple bilateral calycolithiasis who suffered from Crohn's disease of long duration and from recurrent gastric ulcers. To achieve complete clearance of stones from the left kidney it was necessary to apply 10,000 shock waves during seven sessions within five weeks. This number is exceedingly high compared to average total doses which were applied to other patients of our group (920 SW per one session). For the treatment was used an electrohydraulic lithotripter (Medipo). A surgical reconstruction of the abdominal wall which had been planned long before was made six weeks after the last ESWL session. The postoperative course was complicated by bleeding gastric ulcer of which the patient died despite an intensive treatment. The autopsy and histology revealed no damage of kidney tissue or adjacent organs caused by ESWL.
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14/118. reflex anuria from unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    Renal function is usually normal or only marginally affected in patients with unilateral ureteral obstruction due to the vicarious function of the contralateral kidney. Few reports exist in which unilateral renal obstruction is associated with anuria (reflex anuria, RA) and acute renal failure. We report the clinical case of a female patient who was referred to the emergency department due to anuria of 72 h duration and acute renal failure (serum creatinine 9 mg/dl) associated with several episodes of violent right flank pain with hematuria following extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). A few weeks before ESWL, urography showed a 2-cm stone located in the right pelvis whilst the left kidney was functionally normal. On admission, renal ultrasound documented a normal left kidney, whilst the right pelvis was hydronephrotic and there were two indwelling stones at the right pyeloureteral junction. After the patient passed a urinary stone, diuresis restarted and acute renal failure was resolved. Thereafter, urography confirmed that the left kidney, the left ureter and bladder were functionally and morphologically normal. RA with acute renal failure has been so scarcely documented that it is considered to be legend by many clinicians. Major textbooks do not discuss RA with acute renal failure. Vascular or ureteral spasm related in part to a peculiar hyperexcitability of the autonomic nervous system may explain RA. We suggest that nephrologists should always consider RA when evaluating acute renal failure. On the other hand, RA might be relatively common and we cannot rule out that only the most severe and/or better-documented cases have been reported in the medical literature.
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15/118. An unusual cause of urinothorax.

    Urinothorax is a rare complication of blunt renal trauma, ureteral instrumentation or ureteral surgery. A leakage from the urinary tract causes urinoma, a retroperitoneal collection of fluid, which can lead to urinothorax. We report a patient with solitary kidney who underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for nephrolithiasis. Four days after ESWL, she had right-sided pleural effusion which demonstrated as urinothorax. urinoma occurring after ESWL, as in our case, is a situation that has not been reported before as a cause of urinothorax. Urinothorax should be taken into consideration in patients with pleural effusion who recently underwent ESWL.
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16/118. Successful extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for sibling pancreatic duct stones.

    We present a case of 2 brothers with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreatic duct stones which could be successfully disintegrated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). An obvious etiology for the pancreatolithiasis, like alcohol or biliary disease, was lacking and point mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene exons 2 and 3 were not detected in the long arm of the 7th chromosome. However, a hereditary etiology could not be precluded since pancreatolithiasis occurred in the siblings. There has been no recurrence of pancreatic stones during 42 months of follow-up periods, for both. ESWL, the least invasive therapy, appeared applicable and effective for pancreatolithiasis in the present cases.
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17/118. Ammonium acid urate urinary stone caused by a low-caloric diet: a case report.

    A 32-year-old woman complained of right back pain and pyuria. The plain radiograph (KUB) and drip infusion pyelography (DIP) demonstrated a right renal stone and hydronephrosis. The stone was successfully treated using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Infrared spectrophotometry revealed that the stone was composed of pure ammonium acid urate. The patient had a 3-year history of excessive anorexia. The low-caloric diet was considered to have caused the disease.
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18/118. atrophy of kidney following extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy of renal calculus in a paraplegic patient with marked spinal curvature.

    OBJECTIVES: To discuss a rare complication of extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) of renal calculus in a paraplegic patient, who had marked curvature of thoracic and lumbar spine. DESIGN: A case report of a paraplegic patient, who developed renal atrophy and hypertension after undergoing ESWL of staghorn calculus. SETTING: Regional spinal injuries Centre, Southport and Mersey Regional lithotripsy Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. PARTICIPANT: A 28-year-old male with spina bifida, paraplegia at L-1 level and considerable curvature of spine and tilting of pelvis. METHOD: ESWL was carried out in three sessions by delivering 1934, 1876, and 2025 shock waves respectively. Localisation of the staghorn calculus was difficult because of spinal curvature and pelvic tilt. RESULTS: A follow-up IVU, performed 3 months after last ESWL treatment, revealed no residual stone in the left kidney, apart from a little low-density calcification in the renal parenchyma adjacent to the lower pole calyx. There were no calculi in the left ureter. The left kidney had become small, though still functioning. MAG-3 isotope renogram showed the left kidney to be markedly atrophic. Relative renal function: right kidney, 94%; and left kidney, 6%. He developed hypertension and a laparoscopic left nephrectomy was performed at another hospital. CONCLUSION: Difficulty in localisation of renal calculi for ESWL must be anticipated in spinal bifida and spinal cord injury patients, who have significant spinal curvature. Because of problems in the positioning of a patient with marked curvature of spine and pelvic tilt, and consequent difficulties in accurate localisation of renal calculi for lithotripsy, these patients may be at increased risk of developing renal parenchymal and vascular damage following ESWL.
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19/118. Acute pancreatitis after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for a renal calculus.

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is currently considered the standard treatment for most renal and upper ureteral calculi. The complication rates with ESWL have been reported to be low, resulting in its widespread acceptance and use. However, as the technique has become more widely available, serious complications as a result of injury to the kidney and the surrounding organs have been recognized. We report on the development of severe acute pancreatitis in a patient after ESWL for a right-sided renal calculus. The patient history and chronologic clinical course strongly suggest a causal association between the ESWL and the development of pancreatitis.
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20/118. Pinball calculus in a ureterosigmoidostomy.

    We report a complication during the treatment of lithiasis with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in a patient with a ureterosigmoidostomy. This woman presented with renal colic bilaterally and renal insufficiency and was found to have an extremely mobile calculus. A significant gaseous reflux from the sigmoid colon was found to propel the solitary calculus in a retrograde fashion across the ureteroileal anastomosis up the ureter into one kidney, and then later, after re-descent to the level of the anastomosis, up into the opposite kidney. After several days of playing hide and seek with this migrating calculus, using extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, the patient became stone free.
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