Cases reported "Klatskin's Tumor"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. granular cell tumor at the hepatic duct confluence mimicking Klatskin tumor. A report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: Granular cell tumors are rare tumors most often located in the oral cavity, skin or subcutaneous tissue. The occurrence of this tumor in the biliary tree is extremely rare. methods: Two patients are described presenting with biliary obstruction due to a tumor at the hepatic duct confluence. One patient is a 38-year-old white male with concomitant cutaneous granular cell tumors, and the other a 50-year-old white female. RESULTS: Hilar excision was performed in both patients. Histopathology of the tumors revealed a proliferation of cells with granular cytoplasm, diagnosed as granular cell tumor. CONCLUSION: At preoperative examination, hilar granular cell tumors are difficult to differentiate from cholangiocarcinoma, sclerosing cholangitis or more common benign biliary tumors. Treatment consists of surgical excision after which prognosis is favorable.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. Foreign body reaction to a metal clip causing a benign bile duct stricture 16 years after open cholecystectomy: report of a case.

    We present herein a case where a benign bile duct stricture developed 16 years after an open cholecystectomy and without any prior symptoms. The patient was thought to have a Klatskin tumor both pre- and intraoperatively and was treated with a resection of the mass and bile duct confluence, while hepaticojejunostomies were also performed to both ducts separately. A pathologic examination of the specimen revealed extensive fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and a nonnecrotizing granulomata. Any hilar mass presenting after upper abdominal surgery should therefore be considered to be potentially a benign bile duct stricture, even with a long symptom-free interval.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. The longest survivor and first potential cure of an advanced cholangiocarcinoma by ex vivo resection and autotransplantation: a case report and review of the literature.

    bismuth type IV hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) carries a poor prognosis; however, ex vivo liver resection and autotransplantation (Atx) is theoretically a treatment option. There are only five previously reported cases of this procedure for hilar CC in the English literature, and most of them died early in the postoperative period. The only reported survivor died of tumor recurrence at 13 months. We are reporting a patient who has survived for 17 months without any sign of tumor recurrence. This probably represents the world's first cure for CC using this technique. This patient is a 26-year-old woman with a bismuth Type IV CC. portal vein involvement at the confluence was shown on angiogram, and in situ resection was deemed impossible. Ex vivo resection of segments five, six, seven, eight, and part of segment four was performed followed by a partial liver Atx. The pathology specimen demonstrated CC with clear margins. MRI and CT examinations done over the subsequent 17 months showed no evidence of recurrence. In conclusion ex vivo liver resection and Atx can be a viable option for cure among highly selected patients with CC.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. Curative reoperation for recurrent cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct: report of two cases.

    Local recurrence, following a resection for cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct, is usually incurable with second curative surgery being almost impossible. To determine the feasibility and significance of second curative surgery, our experiences are presented in this study. The medical records and clinical outcomes of two patients that underwent a re-resection for recurrent cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct were retrospectively reviewed. A 50-year-old female patient that had a recurrent disease at the intrahepatic and intrapancreatic bile duct, 66 months after a segmental resection of the bile duct for common bile duct (CBD) cancer, underwent a hepatopancreatoduodenectomy. A 29-year-old female patient had a recurrent tumor mass in the distal CBD, 28 months after a right hemihepatectomy and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejenostomy for a type IIIa Klatskin tumor, and underwent a segmental resection of the bile duct. The gross type of the above two cases was a papillary tumor. There was no operative mortality or morbidity. All patients are still alive after 46 and 9 months, respectively, without recurrence after the reoperation. It is concluded that a surgical re-resection is possible in selected patients with recurrent bile duct cancer, mostly of the papillary type. A primary operation for bile duct cancer should be performed with a wide surgical margin, and secondary curative surgery should be considered whenever possible in cases of recurrence.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. A new method to obtain a tissue diagnosis of proximal bile duct tumors.

    Klatskin tumors often pose a challenge for diagnosis and treatment. Most of these neoplasms are diagnosed clinically because of the difficulty in obtaining tissue that will provide histologic proof of the disease. When a non-operative course is sought, exhaustive attempts should be made to obtain a tissue diagnosis because of the potential for a false-positive clinical diagnosis. We describe a new way to obtain tissue for diagnosis by placing a laparoscopic choledochoscope through a percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram track, thus allowing the tumor to be directly visualized and biopsied.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. Favourable anatomical variation for the resection of a Klatskin tumour.

    The liver and the biliary tract are rich in anatomical variations, knowledge of which is important for the surgeon. A case of an anatomical variation is reported, which allowed easy and oncologically correct resection of a Klatskin tumour. The variation consisted of abnormally long right and left extrahepatic ducts and an abnormal distal bifurcation, with a cystic duct joining the distal end of the right duct. A favourable modification of surgical strategy could be obtained by an oncologically correct resection of a Klatskin tumour avoiding a liver resection and also allowing easy reconstruction. Complete biliary exposure was necessary to reveal the rare, pre-operatively unrecognized, but favourable situation. In the absence of clear contraindications extended biliary dissection is to be recommended to avoid errors in the evaluation of the resectability of hilar biliary cancers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis: a sequela of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is a rare and deceptive presentation of systemic cancer. We report the treatment of a patient with a klatskin's tumor by surgical resection. The patient presented with symptoms suggestive of liver failure in the early postoperative period. He rapidly developed progressive, multineuroaxis symptoms and died. Routine gastrointestinal evaluation failed to demonstrate any intraabdominal pathologic process that could be responsible for his decline. A MRI of the brain was also unremarkable. Serial lumbar punctures, however, documented leptomeningeal carcinomatosis consistent with a gastrointestinal primary. The clinical presentation of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is subtle and may masquerade as another disease state. The hallmark of this lethal process is the finding of progressive neurologic deficits at more than one level of the neuroaxis. Serial cerebrospinal fluid examination is often diagnostic. This is the first known report of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis secondary to primary cholangiocarcinoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = operative
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Klatskin's Tumor'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.