Cases reported "Knee Dislocation"

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1/5. Posterior dislocation after posterior stabilization TKA.

    Posterior dislocation after primary total knee arthroplasty is a rare but serious complication. The authors described an 85-year-old man receiving bilateral total knee arthroplasty, which achieved good flexion arc immediately. Posterior dislocation occurred on right knee one month after operation, which was treated by close reduction and casting. Dislocation recurred in combination with infection. The mechanism of dislocation was checked under vision when performing open reduction and debridement. The tibial spine escaped from femoral cam in slight flexion and external rotation due to flexion laxity and biceps tethering. On the way to pursuit higher flexion angle, which is beyond the ordinary daily demand, excessive soft tissue release and bone resection seems to b e compromised. Flexion instability alsooccurs out of purpose, accompanied with increased risk of dislocation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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2/5. Posterior tibial subluxation and short-term arthritis resulting from failed posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Posterior tibial subluxations because of combined or isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries require detailed evaluation. PCL reconstructions are difficult procedures because of the low rate of such injuries and the complex anatomy of the ligament. We report on 2 cases of failed PCL reconstruction because of malpositioned femoral tunnels. These 2 cases support the existing biomechanical evidence that the correct placement of the tunnels, especially in the femur, is a major factor in defining the outcome. It seems that the drilling of the tunnels, especially in the femur, during PCL reconstruction must be performed with accuracy and always be evaluated in cases of graft failure. In addition, failed PCL reconstructions are usually accompanied by a short-term excessive arthritis that results in poor functional outcome.
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ranking = 5
keywords = tibia
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3/5. High-energy knee dislocation without anterior cruciate ligament disruption in a skeletally immature adolescent.

    Knee dislocations are rare injuries in any age group, but even more unusual in skeletally immature individuals. Such injuries often occur from high-energy mechanisms and are commonly associated with disruption of both anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Although there are several previous reports of knee dislocation without disruption of the posterior cruciate ligament, there is only one report citing 3 cases of knee dislocation with the anterior cruciate ligament remaining intact, each occurring in skeletally mature individuals. We present a high-energy knee dislocation in a skeletally immature girl without anterior cruciate ligament disruption. We also discuss the evaluation, management, and outcome. Treatment of this condition with arthroscopically assisted posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft 2 weeks after the acute injury resulted in complete functional recovery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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4/5. Type IIIB tibial intercondylar eminence fracture associated with a complex knee dislocation in a grossly obese adult.

    Avulsion fractures of the intercondylar eminence or tibial spine mostly occur in children and adolescents, and are extremely uncommon in adults. A type IIIB intercondylar eminence fracture (i.e. completely displaced and rotated tibial spine) associated with a complex knee dislocation is an extremely rare combination.
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ranking = 6
keywords = tibia
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5/5. Radiologic case study. The case: knee dislocation.

    Knee dislocations are relatively uncommon. However, due to potential neurovascular complications, it is important that the diagnosis is not missed. There are two main classification systems. The position classification system, defined by the relation of the tibia to the femur, helps identify the mechanism of injury and possible associated complications. The Schenck classification system defines the dislocation based on ligamentous and associated injuries, and thus is useful for surgical planning. It is well recognized that treatment should consist of immediate closed reduction with frequent neurovascular assessment, followed by surgical repair/reconstruction. The timing and surgical technique remain controversial.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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