Cases reported "Knee Injuries"

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1/32. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency induces morphological changes of anterior cruciate ligament collagen fibrils.

    We studied the ultrastructural changes of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with transmission electron micrograph cross-sections following isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. biopsy specimens were obtained from the proximal third and anteromedial aspect of the ACL. Fourteen patients with PCL-deficient knees at a mean of 22.1 months from injury to surgery and 5 normal knees amputated secondary to malignant tumors or traumatic injuries were used as controls. A significant difference was found in the number of collagen fibrils per 1 microm2 between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. There was a significant difference found in the collagen fibril diameter between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. The collagen packing density (the percentage of sampled area occupied by collagen fibrils) was also significantly different between the PCL-deficient knee and the control group. The current study shows that an isolated PCL insufficiency can induce morphological changes in ACL collagen fibrils, suggesting that a PCL insufficiency can have adverse effects on other ligamentous structures in the knee joint.
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ranking = 1
keywords = anteromedial, group
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2/32. Knee pain and the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve.

    pain over the front of the knee is common after surgery or trauma but often a definite diagnosis is difficult to make. Over the past year we have seen five cases in which the pain could be ascribed to damage to a branch of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve. Two were subsequent to trauma and three to surgical procedures. In all five cases surgical exploration gave symptomatic relief. Eight cadaveric knees were prosected to explore further the anatomy of this nerve in relation to the injuries. Injury to one of these branches should be considered in cases of persistent anterior, anteromedial or anterolateral knee pain or neurological symptoms following surgery or trauma.
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ranking = 0.99994254507271
keywords = anteromedial
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3/32. Compartment pressure monitoring during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    A prospective double blind randomized study was carried out using 20 healthy males with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency undergoing bone-patellar tendon-bone ACL reconstruction. The subjects were randomized into either water or saline irrigation and then underwent identical reconstructive procedures using an arthroscopic pump. Continuous preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative pressures were monitored using the slit catheter technique. blood pressure and compartment pressure measurements were continuously recorded and noted at all stages of the procedure. Mean preoperative anterior and posterior compartment pressures were similar in both groups. No significant differences were noted between the anterior and posterior compartments of each group. No difference between water and saline irrigation was identified throughout the procedure. In both groups, postoperative pressures were slightly lower in the anterior and posterior compartments compared with preoperative pressures, but not significantly.
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ranking = 3.447295637615E-5
keywords = group
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4/32. Dislocation of the knee with lateral dislocation of the patella. A report of four cases.

    In a group of 25 patients with traumatic dislocation of the knee, four, all of whom had similar ligament and medial soft-tissue injuries, also had associated lateral patellar dislocation. In all four reconstruction was delayed because of their other serious injuries. Having encountered the combination of knee dislocation and lateral patellar dislocation in 16% of our patients, we believe that it may be less rare than is commonly believed. We think that it is important to maintain a high index of suspicion of possible patellar dislocation when medial structures have been severely damaged. Early recognition and immobilisation in extension can prevent fixed lateral dislocation of the patella.
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ranking = 1.1490985458717E-5
keywords = group
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5/32. Injuries to the posterolateral aspect of the knee accompanied by compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau.

    We present 12 cases of patients with injury to the posterolateral aspect of the knee accompanied by a compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau. There were 11 male patients and 1 female patient with an average age of 26 years (range, 17 to 44 years). There were 4 cases of posterolateral rotatory instability and 8 cases of straight lateral instability of the knee. The size of the compression fracture was classified into 2 types, small (8 cases) and large (4 cases). Although the mechanism of injury was considered to be hyperextension and varus force, the pattern of cruciate ligament injuries varied from case to case. The following 3 questions should be considered to determine which cruciate ligament is damaged: (1) Was the ipsilateral foot fixed to the ground? (2) Was forward inertia involved? (3) Was there a direct blow to the anteromedial aspect of the tibia or to the femur? Accompanied fractures of the medial tibial plateau were considered to have been compressed by the medial femoral condyle. The size of the accompanying compression fracture varied; 7 of 8 cases with a small-type fracture had posterior cruciate ligament injuries and 3 of 4 cases with a large-type fracture had anterior cruciate ligament injuries. The size of the fracture is determined by which point of the medial tibial plateau touched the medial femoral condyle. We propose that a compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau indicates a coexistent posterolateral aspect injury, and that especially a small compression fracture strongly suggests an accompanying posterior cruciate ligament injury, as well.
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ranking = 0.99994254507271
keywords = anteromedial
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6/32. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using poly-L-lactide interference screws or titanium screws: a comparative study.

    In the present clinical trial, interference screws, made of poly-L-lactic acid and applied in 46 knees, were compared to titanium screws employed in 45 knees for reconstructing the anterior cruciate ligament using bone-patellar tendon-bone. An identical surgical technique was applied to both groups; and neither group disclosed apparent side effects such as synovitis caused by hydrolysis of the PLLA or abnormal biochemical findings in the blood. There was no significant difference in the postoperative outcome between the two groups.
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ranking = 3.447295637615E-5
keywords = group
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7/32. lower extremity neuromuscular recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; a 2-week case study.

    The lower extremity neuromuscular recovery of a 31-year-old male physical therapy student during the initial 2-weeks following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was evaluated by measuring involved side vastus medialis (VM), gluteus maximus (GMAX) and gastrocnemius (GASTROC) electromyographic (EMG) signals (1000 Hz), plantar forces (50 Hz), and knee pain as the subject performed a series of volitional, maximal effort unilateral, isometric leg presses (6 sec) in a modified continuous passive motion device. Data were standardized to pre-operative values and graphically plotted for split middle technique, celeration line assessment. From 1-8 hours post-surgery, EMG amplitudes and plantar forces decreased, pain increased, and plantar force location shifted toward the forefoot. From 9-12 hours post-surgery, EMG amplitudes and plantar forces increased and pain decreased. By 24 hours post-surgery, pain decreased to pre-operative levels. From 24-72 hours post-surgery, EMG amplitudes and plantar forces increased. From 1-2 weeks post-surgery, EMG amplitudes and plantar forces increased. From 9 hours-2 weeks post-surgery, plantar force location shifted toward the pre-operative location. Sequential increases were observed for GMAX, GASTROC, and VM EMG amplitudes. By 2 weeks post-surgery, plantar forces and VM EMG amplitudes remained reduced. Reduced plantar forces and VM EMG amplitude at 2 weeks post-surgery suggest a need for greater focus on restoring VM function before attempting closed kinetic chain exercises that require the full shock absorption capabilities of the quadriceps femoris muscle group.
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ranking = 1.1490985458717E-5
keywords = group
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8/32. Localised pigmented villonodular synovitis: an uncommon cause of knee pain mimicking a meniscal tear.

    A previously well 30 year old man presented with a short history of intra-articular mechanical locking, swelling, and anteromedial joint line pain. There was localised tenderness, and McMurray's test was positive. arthroscopy revealed a 3.6 x 2.6 x 1.5 cm firm pedicular localised pigmented villonodular synovitis originating from the insertion of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus. Owing to its size and consistency, mini-arthrotomy was required. This allowed a return to sporting activities. Localised pigmented villonodular synovitis can mimic symptoms of a meniscal tear.
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ranking = 0.99994254507271
keywords = anteromedial
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9/32. Complete knee dislocation without posterior cruciate ligament disruption. A report of four cases and review of the literature.

    Complete knee dislocation usually causes disruption of both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Four cases of complete knee dislocation without posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) disruption are reported. All cases involved either anterior or anteromedial dislocation with anterior cruciate ligament disruption and collateral ligament injury, but without posterior cruciate disruption. This is an uncommon finding in complete dislocation of the knee. The PCL may occasionally be spared significant injury in anterior type dislocations, however, thus favorably affecting treatment options.
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ranking = 0.99994254507271
keywords = anteromedial
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10/32. Irreducible posterolateral knee dislocation resulting from a low-energy trauma.

    A small amount of knee dislocations is included in the irreducible knee dislocations group. In such instance, medial femoral condyle is buttonholed through the gap formed by medial retinacular and capsular structures and this prevents reduction. In this study, we present two cases in which there were irreducible posterolateral knee dislocations resulting from a low-energy trauma. In both cases, dimple sign produced by the invagination of the medial retinacular structures and capsule and ecchymosis medially were noted. Soft tissue invaginated between the trochlea and intercondylar notch was extracted by open reduction.
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ranking = 1.1490985458717E-5
keywords = group
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