Cases reported "Knee Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/120. Occult fractures of tibial plateau detected employing magnetic resonance imaging.

    We describe two cases of spontaneous fracture at the tibial metaphysis not diagnosed by standard X-ray. In both cases, only magnetic resonance imaging supplied a precise diagnosis and allowed us to follow the evolution of the pathology. Scintigraphy is equally sensitive but unspecific. osteoporosis was noted in all cases. Hypothetically, similar pathological situations could be present without being diagnosed since they are not always detected by standard x-rays.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/120. Flexon-type Salter-Harris I injury of the proximal tibial epiphysis.

    The authors report a case of a flexion-type epiphyseal separation of the proximal tibia. The injury described herein is a displaced Salter-Harris type I injury. literature pertaining to this rare injury is reviewed, and management options are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/120. Bilateral epiphyseal fractures of the proximal tibia within a six-month interval: a case report.

    An epiphyseal fracture commonly results from avulsion of the epiphysis by traction through the attached ligaments. A fracture of the proximal tibial epiphysis is, therefore, a rare injury because of the absence of collateral ligament attachments. Most proximal tibial epiphyseal injuries occur as avulsion fractures of the tibial tubercle; Salter-Harris Types I or II injuries involving pressure epiphyses are rare. In the current case of a thirteen-year-old boy, the proximal tibial epiphyseal injuries in both knees occurred during quadriceps contraction in the absence of violent trauma, and there was a six-month interval between the two injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.6
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/120. Modified arthroscopic suture fixation of displaced tibial eminence fractures using a suture loop transporter.

    Current arthroscopic suture fixation techniques of tibial eminence fractures are time consuming and the number of anchor sutures that can be placed is limited by the cumbersome and repetitive numerous needle threading steps. This occurs at 2 stages: first, when placing anchoring sutures through the avulsed anterior cruciate ligament stump with a suture punch, and second, when there is a need to traverse the tibial bone canal with the suture ends. We describe a modification that reduces the reliance on conventional rigid instruments and instead uses a loop transporter made from readily available suture material. The suture loop transporter being malleable reduces the necessary width of the tibial bone canal to be made and has a further advantage of minimizing the bone loss during the reaming of the bone tunnel. The subsequent potential for a stress fracture at these tunnel sites is also substantially reduced. Our technique is more user friendly, more accurate, and quicker to perform.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.4
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/120. Potential complication of bioabsorbable screw fixation for osteochondritis dissecans of the knee.

    The 3 cases presented describe loosening or failure of bioabsorbable screws in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). In case 1, a 17-year-old boy with OCD of the medial femoral condyle was treated with bioabsorbable screw fixation. Six months after surgery, the patient had an acute episode of pain with effusion. Arthroscopic examination revealed 2 of the 4 screws backed out, causing cartilage damage to the corresponding tibial plateau. The shafts of the remaining 2 screws had completely absorbed, leaving the unabsorbed screw heads as intra-articular loose bodies in the knee. Unpredictable and inconsistent degradation of the screws is believed to be the mechanism for screw back-out and cartilage damage.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/120. A symptomatic cyclops lesion 4 years after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    The cyclops lesion is a fibrous nodule with central granulation tissue located anterolateral to the tibial tunnel after intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) that has been shown to be a cause of failure to regain full extension in the early postoperative period. We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who had undergone arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with a patellar tendon autograft 4 years prior to presentation. Following her reconstruction, she regained full range of motion and returned to collegiate cheerleading. At presentation, she complained of a gradual loss of full extension and joint-line pain with terminal extension. On examination, her graft was stable and she lacked 3 degrees of extension. magnetic resonance imaging documented a 1-cm mass of low signal intensity immediately anterior to the ACL graft within the intercondylar notch. At arthroscopy, a large amount of thick, immobile scar tissue was found immediately anterior to the ACL, consistent with a cyclops lesion. The lesion was debrided and the patient did well postoperatively. patients who present with delayed-onset loss of extension after ACL reconstruction should undergo careful evaluation including radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging. If a cyclops lesion is diagnosed, arthroscopic resection should be undertaken.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/120. reflex extension loss after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction due to femoral "high noon" graft placement.

    We describe a rare case of a painful reflex extension loss due to femoral malplacement of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft in a female high-level athlete. The graft was placed on the femoral site in the "high noon" position combined with a slight medial tibial tunnel placement. The resulting anterior-posterior cruciate ligament impingement near extension caused a persistent functional extension deficit of 20 degrees. Under anesthesia, the extension loss diminished, and thus it was hypothesized that the ACL-PCL impingement during extension activates a proprioceptive reflex leading to a functional extension loss while the patient is awake. After sacrifice of the graft and subsequent replacement of the ACL, full range of motion was achieved within 2 months. After a 3-year postinjury history of 3 arthroscopies and 2 ACL reconstructions, the athlete reached her preinjury activity level again. This rare cause of a reflex extension loss due to femoral high noon graft placement has not been described previously and should be included as a differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with an extension deficit after ACL reconstruction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/120. "Floating tibia-talus complex"--an ipsilateral dislocation of the knee and the subtalar joint in an elderly patient: a case report and review of the literature.

    knee dislocation is defined as a radiographically confirmed total loss of the tibiofemoral articulation. This rare injury is believed to be the result of a high-impact trauma. Knee dislocations are classified according the direction of tibial displacement with respect to the femur. Subtalar dislocation is the simultaneous dislocation of the distal articulations of the talus at both the talocalcaneal and talonavicular joints. These injuries are also quite rare and are mostly (80%-85%) classified as medial subtalar dislocations with the calcaneus lying medially, the head of the talus being prominent dorsolaterally and the navicular located medial and dorsal to the talar head. The authors report the case of an elderly patient who suffered ipsilateral anterior dislocation of his left knee and medial subtalar dislocation of his left foot. The authors believe this to be the first presentation in the English literature of an ipsilateral combination of these two injuries on the same limb.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/120. Injuries to the posterolateral aspect of the knee accompanied by compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau.

    We present 12 cases of patients with injury to the posterolateral aspect of the knee accompanied by a compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau. There were 11 male patients and 1 female patient with an average age of 26 years (range, 17 to 44 years). There were 4 cases of posterolateral rotatory instability and 8 cases of straight lateral instability of the knee. The size of the compression fracture was classified into 2 types, small (8 cases) and large (4 cases). Although the mechanism of injury was considered to be hyperextension and varus force, the pattern of cruciate ligament injuries varied from case to case. The following 3 questions should be considered to determine which cruciate ligament is damaged: (1) Was the ipsilateral foot fixed to the ground? (2) Was forward inertia involved? (3) Was there a direct blow to the anteromedial aspect of the tibia or to the femur? Accompanied fractures of the medial tibial plateau were considered to have been compressed by the medial femoral condyle. The size of the accompanying compression fracture varied; 7 of 8 cases with a small-type fracture had posterior cruciate ligament injuries and 3 of 4 cases with a large-type fracture had anterior cruciate ligament injuries. The size of the fracture is determined by which point of the medial tibial plateau touched the medial femoral condyle. We propose that a compression fracture of the anterior part of the medial tibial plateau indicates a coexistent posterolateral aspect injury, and that especially a small compression fracture strongly suggests an accompanying posterior cruciate ligament injury, as well.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.8
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/120. Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation for chondral lesion of the tibial plateau of the knee.

    Arthroscopic osteochondral autograft transplantation is often used to treat chondral/osteochondral lesions of the femoral condyle of the knee. However, arthroscopic autologous osteochondral grafting to the tibial plateau has not been reported. We report the surgical technique and the clinical course of a patient who underwent engraftment by this method. A 26-year-old man developed symptoms of pain and catching in his knee. arthroscopy revealed a deep chondral lesion, 10 x 15 mm in size, down to the subchondral bone on the posterocentral area of the lateral tibial plateau. The injured cartilage was debrided using a curette and an abrader until normal healthy cartilage bordered the debrided defect. An osteochondral plug, 10 mm in diameter and 20 mm long, the chondral surface of which was orientated 25 degrees obliquely, was harvested from the most peripheral and proximal part of the lateral patellar groove. A bony hole was created in the center of the defect through the tibia using a core reamer. The osteochondral plug was inserted from the tibial window through the bony hole. To enhance the stability of the osteochondral fragment, bioactive ceramic fillers were used to fill the space below the plug. A second-look arthroscopy 10 months after surgery showed that the grafted osteochondral plug was well adapted and integrated into the surrounding cartilage on the lateral tibial plateau.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.8
keywords = tibia
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Knee Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.