Cases reported "Kyphosis"

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1/51. A case of sternal insufficiency fracture.

    We report a case of insufficiency fracture of the sternum in a 70-year-old female patient with a review of the literature. She complained of sudden onset chest pain and aggravating dyspnea. She has been managed with corticosteroid due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for 15 years. diagnosis of sternal insufficiency fracture presented with thoracic kyphosis was made on the basis of absence of trauma history, radiologic findings of lateral chest radiograph, bone scintigraphy and chest computed tomography. Thoracic kyphosis and osteoporosis secondary to menopause, corticosteroid therapy and limited mobility due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were considered as predisposing factors of the sternal insufficiency fracture in this patient.
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2/51. Circumferential cervical surgery for spondylostenosis with kyphosis in two patients with athetoid cerebral palsy.

    BACKGROUND: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy may develop severe degenerative changes in the cervical spine decades earlier than their normal counterparts due to abnormal cervical motion. methods: Two patients, 48 and 52 years of age, presented with moderate to severe myelopathy (Nurick Grades IV and V). MR and 3-dimensional CT studies demonstrated severe spondylostenosis with kyphosis in both patients. This necessitated multilevel anterior corpectomy with fusion (C2-C7, C3-C7) using fibula and iliac crest autograft and Orion plating, followed by posterior wiring, fusion using Songer cables, and halo placement. RESULTS: Postoperatively, both patients improved, demonstrating only mild or mild to moderate (Nurick Grades II and III) residual myelopathy. Although both fused posteriorly within 3.5 months, the patient with the fibula graft developed a fracture of the anterior C7 body with mild anterior graft migration, and inferior plate extrusion into the C7-T1 interspace. However, because he has remained asymptomatic for 9 months postoperatively, without dysphagia, removal of the plate has not yet been necessary. CONCLUSIONS: patients with athetoid cerebral palsy should undergo early prospective cervical evaluations looking for impending cord compromise. When surgery is indicated, circumferential surgery offers the maximal degree of cord decompression and stabilization with the highest rate of fusion.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = fracture
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3/51. association of posterior rib fractures with exaggerated kyphosis and sternal collapse.

    The ribs, sternum, and vertebrae all play an important role in stabilizing the thorax. Failure of one of these components places additional stress on the other supporting structures. We present a case of a 62-year-old man with multiple myeloma and osteopenia who sustained fractures to all three components.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = fracture
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4/51. Gross vertebral collapse associated with long-term disodium etidronate treatment for pelvic Paget's disease.

    Inhibition of skeletal mineralisation is a well-recognized complication of disodium etidronate therapy that was identified in the earliest studies of its use in osteoporosis and Paget's disease. The effect is seen at lower doses in Paget's disease than in osteoporosis. Several cases of spontaneous fractures occurring in unaffected bones of Paget's patients have been reported. However, we believe the case described here is the most severe example of etidronate-induced osteomalacia published in the literature, featuring widespread vertebral collapse occurring as a consequence of nearly 10 years of uninterrupted etidronate treatment for isolated hemipelvic Paget's disease.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = fracture
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5/51. "Bamboo spine" starts to bend--something is wrong.

    A typical complication of ankylosing spondylitis with an atypical patient history is reported and the topic is discussed. The diagnosis of a spinal fracture may be difficult in a "bamboo spine".
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = fracture
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6/51. A rare case of osteoporotic spine fracture associated with epidural lipomatosis causing paraplegia following long-term cortisone therapy.

    Cushing's syndrome is frequently associated with osteoporosis. Therefore, the incidence of osteoporotic spine fractures is significant. They are a rare cause of paraplegic syndromes. Additionally, epidural lipomatosis may occur in those patients. The combination of both fracture and lipomatosis may cause neurological deficit. A case of a young patient suffering from drug-induced Cushing's syndrome is reported. She developed progressive paraplegia. Radiographs demonstrated kyphosis of the thoracic spine from T7 to T9 and pathologic fractures. Urgent operation was planned to stabilize and decompress the spinal cord in the area of the kyphosis. Fortunately, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was conducted first. It confirmed pathologic fractures of T7-9 but also showed massive epidural fat extending from the level of T1 to T9. As suspected, laminectomy alone in the area of the fracture proved to be insufficient, as shown by myelography during operation. For treatment of paraplegia in this case of symptomatic epidural lipomatosis, an expanded laminectomy was necessary to remove all the epidural fat. Having undergone this procedure, the patient is now recovering from paraplegia. Our experience suggests that care should be taken before operative treatment of patients with pathological fractures in combination with Cushing's syndrome. In addition to vertebral fractures, epidural lipomatosis has to be taken into consideration. Those patients with neurological deficits have to be treated by an extensive laminectomy.
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ranking = 1.5714285714286
keywords = fracture
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7/51. Posterior spinal shortening for paraplegia after vertebral collapse caused by osteoporosis.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report of a patient who underwent a new surgical procedure for paraplegia after vertebral collapse due to osteoporosis. OBJECTIVES: To propose a new approach to posterior spinal fusion surgery for osteoporotic patients. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Surgical treatment was performed on a paraplegic patient after vertebral collapse due to osteoporosis. However, the surgery was difficult because implants such as hooks and screws often dislodged during the treatment. The poor holding power of these implants to the osteoporotic spine is a challenging problem in this treatment. methods: When a fractured vertebra is shortened by resecting the posterior part of the spine and the application of a compression force, a short vertebra is produced. As a result, the thoracic kyphosis decreases and the force pushing the upper thoracic spine inferio-ventrally also decreases. RESULTS: A 74-year-old woman with T12 vertebral collapse was treated with this new method. Lateral Cobb angle (T10-L2) was reduced from 26 to 4 degrees after surgery. The shortened vertebral body united, and after 33 months, the implant had not dislodged and no loss of correction was seen. CONCLUSION: The posterior spinal shortening can be a choice for treating delayed paraplegia after osteoporotic vertebral fracture.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = fracture
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8/51. Traumatic subluxation of the axis after hyperflexion injury of the cervical spine in children.

    Six cases of children (four boys and two girls, mean age 11 years) who had traumatic subluxation of the axis (C2) were reviewed retrospectively. Initial radiographs demonstrated no detectable vertebral fracture in any of the children. However, a slight anterior subluxation of C2 was observed in three of the patients. Radiographs, taken at 1 month after injury in all but one patient, revealed a progression of the subluxation and a local kyphosis in all of the patients. Four of the children were treated conservatively with a cervical brace, and an improvement of both the kyphosis and the anterior slippage of C2 was obtained accompanied by an anteroposterior growth of the C3 vertebral body. The kyphosis of two of the patients became severe and, ultimately, these patients underwent fusion surgery. At the follow-up, none of the patients presented with any significant symptom. For the correct diagnosis of traumatic subluxation of C2, sequential radiographs to confirm the progression of subluxation and local kyphosis are mandatory. Conservative treatment rather than early surgical treatment may be chosen for this injury, because mild and moderate kyphosis can be corrected spontaneously by remodeling of the cervical spine.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = fracture
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9/51. Orthodeoxia and platypnea secondary to a patent foramen ovale despite normal right-sided cardiac pressures.

    Numerous cases of orthodeoxia and platypnea have been reported. Some have been found to be due to intracardiac shunts despite normal intracardiac pressures. In the case presented, a 79-year-old woman was noted to have orthodeoxia and platypnea secondary to a patent foramen ovale (PFO) despite normal intracardiac pressures. She recovered after closure of the PFO. The authors postulate that recent vertebral fractures and subsequent kyphosis, as well as a dilated thoracic aorta, altered intrathoracic relationships and may have led to a stream of venous return being directed across the PFO in the upright position, despite normal intracardiac pressures.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = fracture
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10/51. spinal cord injury in children.

    The spinal injured child has speical needs owing to the processes of physical, mental and social growth. goals of physical treatment programs include prevention of: genitourinary complications; contractures; pressure sores; long bone fractures, hip subluxation and dislocation; spinal deformity. Nonoperative treatment of spinal deformity employing external support should be initiated when the potential for spinal deformity exists. External support delays the development of spinal deformity, improves sitting balance and allows free upper extremity use. The overall treatment programs must consider altered body proportions, immaturity of strength and coordination. Case examples of children with spinal injury are presented above to illustrate specific problems stemming from immaturity of physical, cognitive, and social development. Spinal surgery can be a conservative measure in the growing child when there is radiologic evidence of progressive spinal deformity. Posterior spinal fusion with Harrington instrumentation and external support permits immediate return to vertical activity.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = fracture
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