Cases reported "Laboratory Infection"

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1/3. A case of laboratory-acquired murine typhus.

    We encountered a 32-year-old Korean woman who developed murine typhus in a laboratory. She worked as a technician in a laboratory for rickettsial disease. Immunofluorescence test with rickettsial antigen (R. typhi) was positive at 1: 320 on admission and 1: 1280 after 4 weeks. A dose of 200 mg of doxycycline for 7 days proved to be effective for her condition.
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keywords = rickettsia
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2/3. epidemiology of boutonneuse fever in western sicily: accidental laboratory infection with a rickettsial agent isolated from a tick.

    A case is reported of an accidental laboratory infection with a strain of Spotted Fever-Group Rickettsiae freshly isolated from a tick collected in Western sicily. Inoculation into the left thumb of cell-cultured organisms (10(5)/ml) gave rise to clinical signs and symptoms of boutonneuse fever after six days, i.e., a lesion at the point of inoculation, fever, headache, conjunctivitis and myalgias. Rickettsiae were isolated from acute-phase blood samples collected from the infected individual and IgM and IgG response was detected in the patient's serum by indirect immunofluorescence. Complete recovery was obtained after antibiotic treatment. Serologic analysis of the strain, together with analyses of the proteins of the isolate, documented that the isolate was rickettsia conorii and was identical to prototype strain. The relationship of this infection to ongoing studies on the epidemiology of boutonneuse fever in Western sicily is discussed.
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keywords = rickettsia
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3/3. Laboratory-acquired rocky mountain spotted fever. The hazard of aerosol transmission.

    Nine patients with laboratory-acquired rocky mountain spotted fever were seen during the period 1971 to 1976. Investigation of each case revealed either definite or probable exposure to an aerosol containing infectious rickettsiae; in no case was there evidence of parenteral exposure either by accidental self-inoculation or by tick bite. These illnesses are believed to represent infection acquired via the respiratory route. This report emphasizes the aerosol hazard of rickettsia rickettsii in the laboratory and discusses the possibility of respiratory transmission of rocky mountain spotted fever in nature. The illness occurred only in personnel who had received either no vaccination or the primary series of the commercial (Lederie) vaccine against this infection. Other personnel who had received the primary series with multiple booster vaccinations demonstrated increased immunity as measured by humoral antibody titers and rickettsial antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation; no cases of clinical disease developed in these multiply-vaccinated personnel.
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ranking = 1
keywords = rickettsia
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