Cases reported "Larva Migrans"

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1/21. Souvenir from the Hamptons - a case of cutaneous larva migrans of six months' duration.

    Cutaneous larva migrans is a distinctive serpiginous eruption caused by a reaction to burrowing hookworms. The infection is usually self-limited, normally lasting 2-8 weeks, but may persist for more than a year if misdiagnosed. Biopsies of the creeping eruption rarely reveal an organism. Thus, it is important for the infection to be recognized clinically, so that effective treatment may begin. We found topical thiabendazole to be fast and effective in treating this case of cutaneous larva migrans of six months' duration.
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2/21. Two imported cases of cutaneous larva migrans.

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is a rare serpiginous cutaneous eruption caused by accidental penetration and migration in the skin with infective larvae of nematode that normally do not have the human as their host. Although CLM has a worldwide distribution, the infection is most frequent in warmer climates. More recently, they have been increasingly imported from the tropics or subtropics by travelers. We experienced two patients who had pruritic serpiginous linear eruption in their skin for a few weeks after traveling to the endemic areas (brazil and thailand, respectively). After the treatment with albendazole, the skin lesions resolved with post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. We report herein two cases of cutaneous larva migrans successfully treated with albendazole.
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3/21. Treatment of widespread cutaneous larva migrans with thiabendazole.

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is a characteristic eruption that is caused by penetration and migration in the skin of nematode larvae. Both animal and human hookworms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the condition, with ancylostoma braziliensis and A. caninum being the most common among them. CLM is quite common in tropical areas, but, due to travelling, several cases have also been described in europe. We present a patient with CLM who presumably contacted the disease during a holiday in singapore. The patient was treated successfully with oral thiabendazole.
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4/21. One confirmed and six suspected cases of cutaneous larva migrans caused by overseas infection with dog hookworm larvae.

    Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) is characterized as creeping eruption/serpiginous erythema and/or mobile erythematous induration on the skin. In japan, gnathostoma spp. are the most well known pathogens causing CLM, especially the creeping eruption type. Recently, spirurina type X larvae have been added to the list of causative agents for creeping eruption in japan. Here we report one confirmed and 6 suspected cases of creeping eruption caused by infection with dog hookworm larvae. The patients were assumed to have been infected overseas. Dog hookworms such as ancylostoma caninum and A. brasiliense should be considered as possible causative agents for creeping eruption, especially when the patients have a history of travelling overseas.
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5/21. Cutaneous larva migrans with parts of the larva in the epidermis.

    Creeping eruption is usually caused by hookworms, most commonly ancylostoma braziliensis and ancylostoma caninum. Because lesions of cutaneous larva migrans have a typical clinical appearance, they are rarely biopsied. Specimens usually show spongiotic dermatitis with spongiotic vesicles containing neutrophils and eosinophils and a mixed-cell dermal infiltrate with numerous eosinophils. We report a case with parts of the larva migrans in the epidermis on histologic examination.
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6/21. Creeping eruption caused by a larva of the suborder spirurina type X.

    We report a case of creeping eruption caused by a larva of the suborder spirurina type X, which developed in a 46-year-old Japanese male. The patient ate small raw squids (Watasenia scintillans) 5 days before the onset of symptoms. On examination, an approximately 25-cm-long serpiginous red track with vesicles was observed from the right to the upper left side of the abdomen of the patient. Histological examination revealed the transverse section of a larval worm in the upper to middle dermis.The patient serum was positive only for the antibody against larvae of the suborder spirurina type X in ELISA, and negative for all other anti-parasite antibodies. Because a considerable number of people are fond of eating raw or nearly-raw fish and shellfish in japan, opportunities for developing creeping eruption cause by parasites present in raw fish and shellfish are relatively high.
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7/21. A human case of gnathostomiasis nipponica confirmed indirectly by finding infective larvae in leftover largemouth bass meat.

    A human case of creeping eruption due to gnathostoma nipponicum was confirmed indirectly by finding infective advanced third-stage larvae in leftover largemouth bass meat. This is the first report indicating that the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) serves as a source of G. nipponicum infection in humans.
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8/21. Two cases of eosinophilic pustular folliculitis associated with parasitic infestations.

    Two patients presented with papular eruptions that could not be diagnosed clinically. Biopsies of these lesions showed eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF). Both cases were subsequently found to have infestations: one as a result of cutaneous larva migrans was successfully treated with ivermectin and the other caused by scabies mites was successfully treated with topical pyrethrin. The two cases of EPF presented emphasize the need for careful clinicopathological correlation to determine the cause.
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9/21. Cutaneous strongyloides stercoralis infection: an unusual presentation.

    strongyloides stercoralis is a widespread, soil-transmitted, intestinal nematode common in tropical and subtropical countries. The parasite is unique in its capability to carry out its entire life cycle inside the human body. Human beings contract strongyloidiasis by penetration of filariform larvae into the skin or mucous membrane after contact with contaminated soil. The larvae travel by the venous systems to the lungs, then ascend the bronchi to the trachea, where the larvae are coughed up by the human host, subsequently swallowed, and attain their habitat in the small intestine. Chronic strongyloidiasis acquired in endemic areas may last decades and gives rise to various dermatologic lesions, the most characteristic of which is larva currens, a serpiginous, creeping urticarial eruption. In disseminated strongyloidiasis, the characteristic skin lesions are widespread petechiae and purpura. We present a case of disseminated strongyloidiasis with an unusual manifestation mimicking a drug rash and review the dermatologic manifestations of strongyloidiasis infestation.
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10/21. Cutaneous larva migrans, an occupational disease.

    Creeping skin eruption is known to follow exposure to canine and feline hookworm larvae found in contaminated soil encountered in humid, tropical and subtropical regions. A little known hazard of similar infections exists among veterinarians and laboratory workers exposed to Strongyloides larvae from horses located in temperate climates. The evolving clinical picture is described in detail. Continued exposure may lead to a state of hypersensitivity to the parasitic protein resulting in severe hyperimmune reactions. The invasiveness of Strongyloides larvae through intact skin and the pathologic changes associated with infection were demonstrated in a rabbit.
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