Cases reported "Larva Migrans"

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1/5. Cutaneous strongyloides stercoralis infection: an unusual presentation.

    strongyloides stercoralis is a widespread, soil-transmitted, intestinal nematode common in tropical and subtropical countries. The parasite is unique in its capability to carry out its entire life cycle inside the human body. Human beings contract strongyloidiasis by penetration of filariform larvae into the skin or mucous membrane after contact with contaminated soil. The larvae travel by the venous systems to the lungs, then ascend the bronchi to the trachea, where the larvae are coughed up by the human host, subsequently swallowed, and attain their habitat in the small intestine. Chronic strongyloidiasis acquired in endemic areas may last decades and gives rise to various dermatologic lesions, the most characteristic of which is larva currens, a serpiginous, creeping urticarial eruption. In disseminated strongyloidiasis, the characteristic skin lesions are widespread petechiae and purpura. We present a case of disseminated strongyloidiasis with an unusual manifestation mimicking a drug rash and review the dermatologic manifestations of strongyloidiasis infestation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = stercoralis
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2/5. Larva currens in a case of organophosphorous poisoning.

    A 20-year-old healthy farmer consumed organophosphorous poison. On third day he developed diarrhoea and on fourth day linear serpiginous ulcers appeared on both buttocks. Clinically lesions were considered as decubitus ulcers. By stool examination and other laboratory investigations it was diagnosed as cutaneous larva currens due to strongyloides stercoralis in a case of organophosphorus poisoning. Patient responded very well to a course of albendazole.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
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3/5. Cutaneous larva migrans due to Pelodera strongyloides.

    A twenty-year-old landscape worker was evaluated for a widespread cutaneous eruption consisting of papules, pustules, and burrows. Cutaneous scrapings revealed live and dead larvae of a free-living soil nematode, Pelodera strongyloides. This is the third instance of human dermatitis due to this organism, and the first reported in an adult host.
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ranking = 2.8742249179581
keywords = strongyloides
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4/5. Larva currens and systemic disease.

    Of 26 patients infested with strongyloides stercoralis 10 (38.5%) were asymptomatic without systemic or cutaneous signs. Nine patients (34.6%) presented with systemic complaints only and seven patients (26.9%) had systemic and cutaneous manifestations. Further observations of the skin lesions on four of those with systemic and cutaneous manifestations revealed linear urticarial bands, extending to several centimeters within 1 hour and persisting up to many days, waiting and waning. blood examination showed eosinophilia in all patients. These findings confirm the concept that larva currens even alone should be considered a cutaneous sign of systemic disease.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
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5/5. Larva currens. Cutaneous strongyloidiasis.

    strongyloides stercoralis causes a distinctive form of cutaneous larva migrans that is recognized as larva currens. The rapid rate of intracutaneous migration, the cutaneous localization, the chronicity of recurrence, and the frequency of urticarial reaction justify its presentation as a clinically distinguishable form of creeping eruption. This clinical complex should be identified as a cutaneous sign of systemic disease.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = stercoralis
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