Cases reported "Laryngismus"

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1/7. Bilateral negative airway pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE)--a case report--.

    A case of negative pressure bilateral pulmonary edema in a 28 years old healthy female patient, scheduled for diagnostic pelvic laparoscopy for infertility. Following extubation and apparent recovery from anesthesia, she had strong inspiratory efforts due to airway obstruction caused by coughing and laryngeal spasm, that lead to negative pressure bilateral pulmonary edema. The pulmonary edema disappeared within few hours. She was breathing spontaneously through CPAP system (mask-bag-expiratory valve). diuretics and lungs physiotherapy helped in controlling patient's complication.
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keywords = breathing
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2/7. Cervical osteophytes: a cause of potentially life-threatening laryngeal spasms. Case report.

    This 80-year-old woman presented with acute breathing difficulty during neck flexion when cyanosis also developed. The only potential causes were detected on cervical magnetic resonance imaging: two large anterior cervical osteophytes compressing the retropharyngeal space. Excision of these osteophytes resulted in resolution of the symptoms.
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keywords = breathing
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3/7. Brief upper airway (laryngeal) dysfunction.

    We describe in six men, recurrent episodes recurring over months or years, of sudden, brief complete obstruction to respiration followed by dyspnoea with loud inspiratory stridor lasting two to five minutes. Attacks occurred during wakefulness and/or sleep. In one patient an episode was witnessed endoscopically: the initial obstruction was seen to be caused by complete laryngeal closure. The false vocal cords then opened, but the vocal cords remained adducted and caused inspiratory stridor. The similarity of the attacks described by the other patients suggests that they were all caused by laryngeal closure. Furthermore, they could simulate the episodes by voluntarily adducting their vocal cords. The symptoms were usually preceded by a sensation of throat irritation and in four cases symptoms of upper respiratory infection were present. Associated features present in some of the patients included post-nasal discharge, snoring, sleep apnoea and gastro-oesophageal reflux. None was hypocalcaemic. Although stimulation of laryngeal receptors is known to produce reflex laryngeal closure, cough is the usual response during wakefulness. Treatment aimed at reducing upper airway irritation and voluntary inhibition of coughing appeared successful in reducing the incidence and severity of the episodes. Recognition of the condition is important as it may be confused with other causes of acute dyspnoea and it appears to respond to specific management.
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ranking = 3.6250951121189
keywords = respiration
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4/7. Laryngospasm-induced pulmonary oedema.

    A case of pulmonary oedema following laryngospasm in a healthy young woman is reported. Laryngospasm occurred following surgery and was treated with positive pressure oxygen ventilation by mask and by deepening of the level of anaesthesia. The rest of anaesthesia was uneventful. During the following hour, spontaneous respiration deteriorated progressively and ended in manifest pulmonary oedema which was treated by endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation with PEEP for some hours.
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ranking = 3.6250951121189
keywords = respiration
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5/7. Respiratory distress after recurrent laryngeal nerve sectioning for adductor spastic dysphonia.

    Adductor spastic dysphonia is a voice sign associated with various neurologic and psychologic disorders. Treatment of spastic dysphonia in selected patients is unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve sectioning. Except for voice change or, in some patients, return of phonatory spasticity, there have been no long-term sequelae or complications of this treatment. We describe three patients with adductor spastic dysphonia who underwent recurrent laryngeal nerve sectioning and who, 3 to 38 months later, suffered respiratory distress that required tracheostomy. The respiratory distress in all three patients was due to episodic jerky vocal cord hyperadductions that caused stridor during inspiration and expiration. These repetitive laryngospasms during respiration and phonation were progressive. Two patients needed an arytenoidectomy to achieve a useful voice, and all three required a permanent tracheostomy to alleviate inspiratory laryngeal obstruction.
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ranking = 3.6250951121189
keywords = respiration
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6/7. Spasmodic laryngeal dyspnea: a rare manifestation of laryngeal dystonia.

    We describe clinical experiences in the management of three patients with laryngopharyngeal dystonia causing severe breathing problems. In contrast to spasmodic dysphonia, which presents with action-induced involuntary spasm of laryngeal muscles during speaking, all three patients showed laryngopharyngeal spasms primarily during respiration. In analogy to spasmodic dysphonia we propose the term spasmodic laryngeal dyspnea for this rare condition. Localized unilateral botulinum toxin injected into the thyroarytenoid muscle and/or ventricular folds reduced the quantity and quality of spasms and led to a pronounced improvement of breathing problems.
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ranking = 5.6250951121189
keywords = respiration, breathing
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7/7. Paradoxical vocal fold movement: a case report.

    We present a case of one patient with respiratory stridor that was resolved by speech therapy. Paradoxical vocal fold movements were observed by flexible fiberoptic videolaryngoscopy in this patient during episodes of wheezing and dyspnea. Otherwise, normal vocal fold movement was observed in normal conditions of breathing (out of the crisis) and during phonation. Many different terms have been used to describe this entity in the literature, and it is crucial that clinicians recognize the subtle signs of functional stridor. Paradoxical vocal fold motion has to be considered as an important cause of respiratory disease. Its recognition and treatment are discussed in this report.
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keywords = breathing
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